Suggestions for a Noise gate?

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
I'm looking for a good Noise gate.

It has to be nice and small, and I want to keep it on my board, no racks or anything. I don't want a noise gate that will have to go to the amps fx loop, as my amp isn't that loud, just that my pedals can give a little hiss n hum.

I thoghut about the MXR, it's had amazing reviews, but for that price really???
I've heard good things about the Boss NS2 Noise Suppressor, but I've never had a noise gate so I havn't a clue what to look for.
 

Syn

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
823
Reaction score
58
The NS-2 adds a little compression when on. It alters the sound a little, not too noticable, but it does do something. Other than that it's a good effective noise gate. It has it's own loop that gives a lot of options later on, should you get an amp you need to gate aswell as the pedals that go in front.
The ISP Decimator is highly regarded as the best noise gate in pedal form. If you don't like the price of the MXR, you won't like the price of the ISP.
The MXR is also a great noise gate, no tone changes like the NS-2 and like the ISP very simple to use. It is as described, Smart. It's very good at detecting what to eliminate and what to let through, some noise gates that claim to do this, don't.

For your application, the NS-2 will do the job fine. The ISP's are expensive (in relation with the other 2) everywhere including second hand, but you might be able to get a NS-2 or a MXR Smart Gate for a good price on ebay.
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
Thank's Syn, good help.

The MXR sounds more value for money. The Boss NS2 sounds like a good choice, but I don't really want it to compress, I want the sound to kind of breath without that nasty hiss and hum! I'm gonna shop around for the MXR, if it really is too expensive, I'll go for the NS2. Thanks Syn :)
 

Syn

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
823
Reaction score
58
What the NS-2 does to the sound is hard to describe. I leave mine on all the time when using OD. It does something that seems a little like compression, but it doesn't strangle the sound. Trust me when I say the tone change is negligable. I've had no problems with mine.
Last time I checked, around the £70-£75 mark is a good price for a good condition used MXR.
£50-£60 is good for a used Boss.
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
I think at some point I'll go and try to the Boss. If I'm not satisfied, I'll go and get the MXR. It looks like the Boss has more tweaking options. I'll probably get the Boss anyway, because it just looks more convenient. I'll probably get it new, nothin' like the smell of a new Boss =D
 

Skintaster

V.I.P. Member
Joined
May 15, 2010
Messages
20,530
Reaction score
44,445
I got to agree that the ISP Decimator is hard to beat if you have a lot of noise issues. My main practice rig is an old 5150 half stack, with a pedal board, and several guitars with high output pups. It used to squeal like hell with noise and feedback... Even at low volumes. I never liked the other gates I tried, but the ISP pedal totally fixed all of my problems. I wouldn't want to play without it now.

That said, they're not uber cheap. The lowest price I've found new was about $140 at some kind of GC sale... But it would be worth every penny to me.

On the other hand, if you're not battling the noise issues brought about by a high gain rig, and just have some hum, the Boss unit would probably work. As others have noted, it's not completely transparent, and does seem to color sound a bit.
 

Alligatorbling

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
47,375
Reaction score
62,074
ive used the MXR Smart Gate to tame some pretty bodacious noise generated by running A LOT of pedals in line with each other simultaneously at high volumes. It has always done a great job without taking away anything (other than the unwanted noise lol)
 

ynot

Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
62
Reaction score
7
I use an NS-2 & it's fine for me.I do recommend getting something with a loop like the NS-2 or the ISP G-String,the ISP is pricier though.With a loop you can put your noise sources (pedals) in it so the gate can detect the threshold level from your dry unaffected signal but apply it to whats in the loop as well.This way you can set the threshold lower instead of at the noise level which in some cases may be too high for you to get good swells & quiet playing etc,no one likes a choppy gate (at least that I know of).I've never used the MXR or Decimater so maybe they have some other way around this but that's how gates typically work.
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
I have generaly hum. I don't use high gain, I use a Led Zep and AC/DC kinda tone.

You've just given me one more reason to get the NS2.
 

V!N

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2007
Messages
4,064
Reaction score
171
Hum would indicate a grounding issue...

Instead of trying to clean up the noisy mess, it's better to prevent it by investing in good cables and a good power supply for the pedals (regulated outputs with isolated grounds) and power conditioning or voltage regulation for the mains.
 

AngryHatter

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2009
Messages
17,182
Reaction score
13,129
7510.jpg


If you take the time to read the instructions and use the loop, there is absolutely no coloration of the sound.
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
Vin, I have a good MXR DC Brick, which is a power conditioner also, so no fried pedals here! I do use good cables, planetwaves and some other unknown brand that I like.
 

V!N

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2007
Messages
4,064
Reaction score
171
The Dunlop DC-Brick puts the outputs on a common ground. (like a daisy chain)
This is not ideal in the prevention of noise.

Power conditioners are for the mains, the 240V you get from the wall.

Cables from "some other unknown brand" eh ?
Well, you really can't go wrong with any of the stuff those guys make. :dude:
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
I bought teh cables from 'some other unknown brand' because they were thick and long for gigs. They hold up well.
 

firesgt911

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
3,072
Reaction score
2,745
The Dunlop DC-Brick puts the outputs on a common ground. (like a daisy chain)
This is not ideal in the prevention of noise.

Power conditioners are for the mains, the 240V you get from the wall.

Cables from "some other unknown brand" eh ?
Well, you really can't go wrong with any of the stuff those guys make. :dude:

Agreed. Power supply and cables are the most likely culprit to the hum.
 

ReadingOwls

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
305
Reaction score
8
I've just re-strung my Ibanez, so I've been really playing Metal. As I don't have a hi-gain pedal, I just go straight to the amp with my gigging cable. That cables is gonan still be mine when it's broke, it was tehre for me when I had my first gig ;D
 

ehamady6

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2008
Messages
3,785
Reaction score
567
I really like my NS-2 and always leave it on. I don't notice it coloring my tone, probably due to my compressor and BBE Sonic Stomp. I play death and black metal through high gain pedals (ie MXR Fullbore Metal), high output pickups (active EMGs), and a 100 watt Marshall half stack. The NS-2 keeps my rig dead quiet which is imperative for achieving effective "holes of silence" during detuned, palm-muted, downstroke chugging. Plus the NS-2 can power 7 other pedals.
 

Latest Threads



Top