Studio with broken headstock - repair myself or send off

larryguitar

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Just adding that if you can find some 10MM (or whatever the tuner holes measure) acrylic or PVC rods, it'd be an easy and nearly fool-proof way to confirm proper alignment.


Larry
 

D'tar

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Titebond I. Trim any fibers that may prevent the joint closing fully. Gentle compressed air can work the glue deep into the joint. Looking good. You will do just fine.
 

moreles

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Many of us would readily undertake this repair. It's a clean break with no material loss which makes bonding very successful. I would go with superglue if the parts fit virtually perfectly, or maybe titebond if they don't. Either would work. (I suspect epoxy would be OK as well, though some disagree.) I would be prepared to redo the overlay, possibly, if the crease remains. The only hard part of this repair, and the finish touchups, etc., is care and patience. To be honest, while neck breaks should not be a tough repair, the world is full of effed-up LPs where dumb, impatient, careless owners have done a crap job. As others point out, undoing a bad repair in this area is a horrible, major nightmare!
 

Troy McClure

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I ordered glue for my repair. I have been trying a few trial fiittings and clamp positions. Its not quite the seamless crack i was hoping for but im afraid to remove too much material.






I'd have thought clamping the pieces flat rather than the sides is the way to go, have a look at this luthiers headstock fix, basically nothing more needed than a bit of clingfilm , couple of flat pieces of wood and a clamp about 11 minutes in


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU#t=11m39s

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU"]www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU[/ame]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU#t=11m39s
 

22tactical

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I'd have thought clamping the pieces flat rather than the sides is the way to go, have a look at this luthiers headstock fix, basically nothing more needed than a bit of clingfilm , couple of flat pieces of wood and a clamp about 11 minutes in


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU#t=11m39s

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ45dTv9ReU#t=11m39s
My headstock seems to be slightly pushed to the right. I was doing the side clamp to try and bring that back to square. I think i am going to need to remove a few more splinters. Once I can get that I will come up with another clamp or clamps.
 

fumblefinger

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My headstock seems to be slightly pushed to the right. I was doing the side clamp to try and bring that back to square. I think i am going to need to remove a few more splinters. Once I can get that I will come up with another clamp or clamps.
Clamps? Did you say clamps?
 

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fumblefinger

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I really hated to do that jig like that, but that banjo was kicking my butt.
 

fumblefinger

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It was not only secure, but it let me see what was going on better than the clamp and caul method I'd been using. If I ever do another guitar decapitation I'll pull the banjo fret center out of it and put the guitar one in. It's way better adjustment than just tightening a clamp. The dry run is much easier to adjust and get it "just so".
 




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