Strings causing tailpiece to tilt

Olat

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Hello everyone! :wave:

I recently purchased a Cort CR100 guitar and have noticed that my tailpiece is a little tilted forward once I get all my strings in tune.
I wanted to raise the tailpiece a little bit, but I'm afraid to do so since I'm not sure if it can break of or something.

I came here since I see people have a lot of experience with LP guitars, so I was hoping someone might have any tips and tricks I could use to remedy this on my Cort as well. I was thinking of maybe using a little newspaper and wood glue on the screws, but let me know your thoughts please!

I've attached a few photos of the issue.

Let me know if I can provide any further information!

Thank you!
 

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Olat

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This is a good case for top-wrapping.

Hi! Thanks for replying!

I'm sorry, but I watched the whole video and was not able to figure out what top wrapping has to do with this? Strings still create tension and pull the tailpiece in the same direction.
 

Kennoyce

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Hi! Thanks for replying!

I'm sorry, but I watched the whole video and was not able to figure out what top wrapping has to do with this? Strings still create tension and pull the tailpiece in the same direction.
In the pictures you can tell that the tilt is coming from the back of the tailpiece bushings being pulled up slightly out of their holes. Top-wrapping the strings will decrease the amount of outward pulling force and will leave it being pulled mostly just in shear. Top-wrapping will give the same effect as raising the tailpiece (decrease the break angle of the strings over the bridge), but won't have any of the downsides of actually raising the tailpiece.

Definitely don't use newspaper and wood glue for anything (I'm not sure what you are trying to use it for, but just don't).
 

christopherJ

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Can you send it back? That be the easy button solution.

So what we have here is most likely the wood dried and the post are pulling out. Top wrapping probably won't help. I'd remove the stop bar and see just how loose they are. If you can pull them out easily then of course the fix will be harder. If they seem to be firmly in, then a few taps with a hammer to see if you can seat them a bit better.
 

Olat

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Can you send it back? That be the easy button solution.

So what we have here is most likely the wood dried and the post are pulling out. Top wrapping probably won't help. I'd remove the stop bar and see just how loose they are. If you can pull them out easily then of course the fix will be harder. If they seem to be firmly in, then a few taps with a hammer to see if you can seat them a bit better.
Hi All! Thanks for replying!

Unfortunately, sending it back is not an option.

I've listened to your advice. I removed the stop bar and the upper post is just a little loose, while the lower one is quite easy to get out (almost no resistance whatsoever).

I'd like to avoid having to drill anything on the guitar since I'm not an expert by any means and there is no luthier in my area (I live in Bosnia and Herzegovina, people don't buy electric guitars that much since they're hella expensive, which is also why I have a Cort :) ).
That's the reason I was going for newspaper and wood glue, since I saw something like that HERE.

My main concern here is not the visual state of the guitar (though I'd like to fix if for that reason as well), but the fact that I'm afraid this problem might damage the guitar over time, bend totally, or break pieces of the body.
Any advice on how I could fix this without plugging the hole and re-drilling?

Thanks!
 

christopherJ

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You could try making some shims from toothpicks. Use some wood glue or white school glue as well. You want enough friction to where you have to tap them in with some resistance, but not so much you split the wood. Also be careful with the finish around the hole. It is both sharp and prone to chipping. Before starting, chamfer the finsh around the hole.
 

christopherJ

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Just watched the referenced video. That would absolutely work too.
 

Mick Weiss

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Were the studs like that when you got the guitar? If so it's possible they weren't pressed all the way in at the factory. I would remove the tailpiece, unscrew the studs, then check to see if the studs have a loose fit or just need to be set completely. Place a piece of wood over the insert, and tap the inserts all the way in with a hammer. If they do it again, then try something else, like a shim of some sort. Take it slow so you don't do any permanent damage...
 

Olat

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Hi, just an update on this.

I've put a small piece of paper tape (I think it's the same as what you'd call a masking tape) on the one that was just a little loose and it worked like a charm.
I've put a bit more on the problematic one and added the tip of a toothpick split in half on top of that and used a piece of wood to slightly press it down and then gave it a few knocks with a small rubber hammer (still using the wood, not directly with the hammer).

I think it looks a lot better, but there's still a slight gap. Some of the gap is probably the result of the body curvature of the guitar, but a small gap remains due to tension.

I think I'm fine with the way it looks now, but I'm wondering if there's any danger of the poles popping out of the body or making some kind of damage? I think not, since they are quite deep in the guitar body for that to just happen out of the blue, but I'm not that familiar with the electric guitar, let alone the tune-o-matic and other design decisions used on Les Paul and many of it's copies, like the one I have.
I'd love to hear your opinion on this!

Thanks!

Image01.jpg Image02.jpg Image03.jpg Image04.jpg
 

christopherJ

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Masking tape? Er, no...I wouldn't use that.

When you string to tension do the posts move at all? Can you see it pulling back out? If so, there is your answer.

The problem with using tape is that tape is spongy. It will change over time (dry out) and you will still probably have troubles. I think I would try the paper and glue trick that was shown in the video. That will be a solid, long lasting repair.
 

Side Burns

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Sounds like you took care of it. If it lifts again use some glue as was mentioned, but if you have a tight fit now, than you should be ok.

As a side note look up setting intonation on the bridge. Once you set the intonation it will sound a lot sweeter
 

smk506

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I would pull those pushing back out and cleanup the previous attempt as best you can.

Get some thin super glue and a small cheap paint brush. Cover the top of the guitar well leaving access to the holes and paint a layer of super glue into the hole as evenly as you can.

Wait for it to dry, then repeat the process until the bushing that’s drops right in requires at least gentle tapping to seat.
 

Olat

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Masking tape? Er, no...I wouldn't use that.

When you string to tension do the posts move at all? Can you see it pulling back out? If so, there is your answer.

The problem with using tape is that tape is spongy. It will change over time (dry out) and you will still probably have troubles. I think I would try the paper and glue trick that was shown in the video. That will be a solid, long lasting repair.
Yes, I can still see a gap... I removed the tape, tried with newspaper and wood glue (as in the video), left it dry for around 2 hours and still the same thing happens as soon as I restrings the guitar.

If I put a thicker layer of paper, then I can't get it in at all, and once I push it, all the glue and paper come out basically, making it impossible to push until the end.
 

christopherJ

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2 hours isn't near enough time. Was the glue still tacky when you pulled it out? Are you using just your fingers to push it in? The video didn't show newspaper either.
 

Olat

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2 hours isn't near enough time. Was the glue still tacky when you pulled it out? Are you using just your fingers to push it in? The video didn't show newspaper either.
The glue was a bit tacky, yes. I used a piece of wood and a small rubber hammer, I was not able to push it in with only my fingers.
The video creator used newspaper, says it works best in his experience.
Should I leave it for 10-12 hours, would that be enough?
 

ARandall

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Wood glue tends to need about 12 hours to dry and say minimum 24hrs before you put stress on the area.
 

Olat

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I've used the newspaper + glue method again, this time I'll leave it for 24 hours before putting the strings back on.
While doing this, I damaged the guitar finish, as visible in the photo below. I tried to be as careful as possible, but I must have hit the wood one too many times.

I cried like a baby, and a little piece of me dried and died forever. I still feel like the biggest idiot on the face of our sweet planet.

I'll follow up in 24 hours, once I restring the instrument. In the meantime, I'm browsing the web to see if there's any way to remedy the damage I made.

If anyone has any tips, please share. Also, please let me know if it's better to just leave it as is. I don't want to cause any more damage to my brand new baby.

Thank you!
 

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Side Burns

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Once its all done and strung up you won’t see it

plus, look at the Les Paul Joe Perry has that Slash used in the November Rain video.

regarding the chip as the song goes “don’t you cry tonight” :yesway::slash: :cheers:

 

ARandall

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I tried to be as careful as possible, but I must have hit the wood one too many times.

I cried like a baby, and a little piece of me dried and died forever. I still feel like the biggest idiot on the face of our sweet planet.
Every guitar gets damaged, and far worse than this insignificant issue.

I guess you could buy a duplicate and sit it in a glass case if you want to see a pristine 'untouched by any contact' version of the guitar.
Just by playing it you'll end up with far worse, and in more obvious locations too.
 


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