String Change Frequency

Buffalo

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I change strings when they break or when they start to look nasty.
 

RevCnick

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I go through a lot of strings on setup for the guitars I build. And I include a new spare set along with the strings that are already on the guitars I ship.

I do this because they are dirt-cheap, and people like them.

I use the house brand for Musician's Friend.

Something like $2.29 per pack. I've had great reviews on them, as well as customers asking me where they can get the strings I supply. This is why I started including an extra set.

Musician's Gear Strings, 10-46

$2.29 per pack, and free shipping, even on small orders!
Politucs?
 

dro

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Put new strings on my #1 Les Paul last time I used it in November last year. Played about 3 hours. Been in the case since. Next time I play it will get a new set. My acoustics are constantly getting tuned up and down. Standard tuning, open G, open D, Down to Eb, or D standard. Usually will not change on acoustic until I have a gig, or a string breaks. If going to a full gig, every guitar I take will get fresh strings, as well as new batteries if applicable.
 

northernguitarguy

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I prefer 80/20s on my acoustic guitar, so I tend to go through those quickly. Even with light playing, they lose their spark quickly..but dang, so harmonious when they are fresh and crisp.

Electrics, every two months, or a week before a gig...I like them to be all stretched out and a bit broken in.
 

Freddy G

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I can get 2 gigs out of a set usually, unless it’s a summer outdoor gig in the heat. That usually kills a set after one show.
I'm exactly the same. If I let it go and keep strings on for a third gig, they WILL break....but I have acidic sweat and I do beat the shit out of them.
 

PeteNJ75

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That's what everyone says, but my experience soured me on them.
I got a bad string from Pyramid once too. They immediately replaced the entire set. I wouldn’t avoid them because of one string glitch. I mean, I get it, but Pyramids are the best strings out there, hands down. They last forever and have a feel and sound you just don’t get with other strings IMO. The Gibson Vintage Reissues are my 2nd favorite.
 

MiniB

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I got some of the MF strings in...they seems a bit stiffer and not as lively as D'Adarrios, but they're fine to have around as spares or temp ones if you're comparing hardware.

I might try some Pyramids.
 

itsTrips

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This is has always been conflicting for me personally. More on that in a second.

As for how often I change mine out... once the unwound strings lose that slick smooth feeling, or begin to feel kind of sharpish when fingering chords, like abrasive, I either replace them, or think about replacing them often until I cave and do so.

However, when it comes to wound strings, especially the E and A, the sound they produce when they begin to die, until they are in fact dead, that numb thuddy tone, has always been an object of my affection. I always miss that tone when I put new wound strings on and that bright, buzzy new wound string sound returns. Hence my conflict in changing sets.

Because of this there have been times where I would only replace the G/B/e unwound strings, but now days, I mostly do it all at once.
Used to be Slinky Hybrids, now days Daddario, and always hybrid sets 9-46 or 10-52.

But the suggestion on the rear of that Gibson package seems pretty advantageous to me, at least for the average non-gigging shredders.
 

TrippyStormtrooper

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Man. I would go broke changing at those rates. I play for an hour/half every day, 5-6 days a week without fail. I change maybe once a month. I would be highly doubtful if the new formula strings and stability of metals would necessitate changing strings weekly for me.
 

MiniB

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If I was gigging a few times a week steadily, I'd likely be changing strings weekly, because I can eat through them within a long set if I'm really playing hard and sweating.
 

MiniB

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This is has always been conflicting for me personally. More on that in a second.

As for how often I change mine out... once the unwound strings lose that slick smooth feeling, or begin to feel kind of sharpish when fingering chords, like abrasive, I either replace them, or think about replacing them often until I cave and do so.

However, when it comes to wound strings, especially the E and A, the sound they produce when they begin to die, until they are in fact dead, that numb thuddy tone, has always been an object of my affection. I always miss that tone when I put new wound strings on and that bright, buzzy new wound string sound returns. Hence my conflict in changing sets.

Because of this there have been times where I would only replace the G/B/e unwound strings, but now days, I mostly do it all at once.
Used to be Slinky Hybrids, now days Daddario, and always hybrid sets 9-46 or 10-52.

But the suggestion on the rear of that Gibson package seems pretty advantageous to me, at least for the average non-gigging shredders.
Ever though of trying flatwound or semi-flatwound sets?
 

Dolebludger

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If the strings become so stiff that they are too hard to play, of course change them. But strings lose their bite and treble over time. When this is the only issue, I adjust my amp. when fretting the strings becomes a problem, they are gone. But I actually like the tone of well worn in strings better than brand new ones. But I like a thick, rich tone. Those who like the tone of a single coil Tele set on the bridge pup may need to change strings more often. It all depends on the tone we are searching for..
 

Leumas

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I play bass in the band, so if we do our normal 20-40 gigs a year.....well, my 2006 J with original strings might need new ones in a couple years.
 

dro

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I play bass in the band, so if we do our normal 20-40 gigs a year.....well, my 2006 J with original strings might need new ones in a couple years.
?
 

RandyP

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I don't do it at all.
I've run a number of commercial studios and like many of my cohorts, groan when some guitar player walks in proud of having just changed his strings for the session. Get ready for some repeated tuning, tuning checks and so on while the creative spark (not to mention the budget) goes down the drain.

Old strings are stable and their tone can reliably be optimized along with the rest of the instrument, the appropriate eq. New strings require you to diddle with the eq as they age. Focus on your playing. It's what got you here. "Tone" as a holy grail is a fool's errand anyway unless you're a gear salesman. It's your hands that matter.

One little tidbit...

Wound strings actually get flat spots from being pressed on the frets at the same position when they break in. This is good for a variety of reasons not the least of which is tuning stability in varying temperatures and humidities.
 

dro

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If you're not checking tuning before every track. Running the risk of redoing tracks due to bad notes. Today it can be fixed in post. But the les you have to fix, the better.
 

itsTrips

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Ever though of trying flatwound or semi-flatwound sets?
I have. Don’t dig them really on my guitars, but it’s been a while. Maybe I’ll try em again.
I do love them on my bass tho! I run La Bella flat wounds on P bass. They’re great.
 

5F6-A

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I play about four hours a week. I change strings roughly every three months. If I have a session or a gig this might be different but if it's for a guitar that I only use at home, I don't feel the need to change them more often than that. I have a very mild skin chemistry.
 


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