string break-in

mshanecrowe

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Me again, noob here..

I've been practicing fulls step bends with my G string. Guitar is a new 2013 Studio Deluxe II model. I've had it 5 months and have only sparingly done some bends. Nothing crazy. Not trying to see how far I can bend stuff.

That damn G string immediately goes out of tune with the 1st full step bend. I can see it in my tuner after just one full step bend. After 3-4 of these bends, I can hear it out of tune with my ear (playing a G on the D string and an open G at the same time).

I've tried some extra bends to break the string in. (heard this was neccessary to break strings in) So I bent it a couple steps or so and tried holding the bend several or 10's of seconds. Wash, rinse, repeat. Even tried these break-in bends on different frets.

No improvement in the going-out-of-tune issue. It consistently goes out of tune slightly with just 1 full step bend. Again, after 3-4 bends, it is obvious to the ear. Its been this way since day 1 and I can't seem to get them broken in (if in fact that's what the problem is)

I have watched my tuners very intently as I bend and I can't see them moving at all, so I don't think the tuners are slipping.

These strings are what I got with the guitar from Guitar Center. Do the strings just suck? Do I need to do a lot more to get them broken in? What gives?
 

dangerdog

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Take each string and carefully, so you don't cut yourself, grab each string and pull it up away from the fretboard...pretty hard. I yank them. Do this to all of them a few times. then tune up and bend like crazy and totally whale on it for a few minutes...retune. Should be fine then. Also might want to put a little pencil lead in the nut slots if it is still doing this.
 

WhatDoIKnow

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I put a finger under each string and go up and down the string while pulling up. Yes, be carefull on the lighter strings.

Stretch, tune, stretch, tune is usually good.
 

ulrik91

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If you still have the strings that came with the guitar after 5 months, you should probably change them.
 

Thiago

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Les Pauls are historically known for having tunning issues on the G string.

But I've never seen something like that that can be considered normal and not fixable.

If your strings are 5 months old, definitely change them and put some graphite on the nut. Just grab a pencil and rub the string slots.

Then you can worry about the nut, the tuner and so on...
 

DPaulCustom

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I've gotten in the habit of, when I restring, tuning 2 steps higher than the desired pitch, then letting them sit overnight.
I also do this

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae7HsWFRdYY]How to Change Strings on an Electric Guitar : Bend & Lock Your New Guitar Strings - YouTube[/ame]

+1 on the new strings, & graphite in the nut slots
 

lpplayer

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Agree with everyone here.

The nut slots need to be lubricated.....lots of ways to do that in addition to the pencil lead, just do a search here. I use either Chapstick or waxed dental floss....the latter also cleans the slots up a bit.

When you change strings, stretch them in like crazy. Pull them away from the board, push down on them at the bridge and nut....then retune....this may take several times to get the string "seated"
 

Roach0

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Yank and hold string 3-5 cm above fretboard for a few seconds, tune up. Repeat 4-5 times with each string. Done!


Posted from Mylespaul.com App for Android
 

D28boy

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The best way I've found to keep the guitar in tune is:-

Always tune up to pitch from flat

Once you've tuned to pitch..pull the string a bit away from the pick-up quite firmly.

Check tuning again..you'll probably find it's flat and then tune to pitch again.

Repeat with the other 5 strings.

Works great for me.
 

LP_NEWFAG

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Just like last guy I find tuning up from flat is something I do every time I tune .
 

rikko

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Agree with all of the previous posts (nut lube, tune sharp-stretch-repeat until stable)
but definately start with new strings.
Examine the nut (are the grooves cut too deep?) and saddles to see if the problem string is "catching" or "binding" somewhere.
 

MooCheng

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a lot of tuning issues are down to the nut
do you hear any " pings " as you tune up ?
if you do its a sure sign the string is binding in the nut
 

jc2000

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I always stretch my strings a little when I first put them on.
 

mdubya

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There are a couple of different ways to string your guitar that will all work fine. I use this particular method, including lubing the nut with every string change ( I scrape graphite from a pencil into the nut slots, works like a charm). The only thing I do differently is I do one wrap over the top of the string at the tuning post and then the rest go under. I few pulls/stretches and the guitar stays in tune for weeks at a time.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGLMy6DbpBc]The proper way to restring a guitar by Bill Baker - YouTube[/ame]

Lube residue in my nut slots.

 

Bristol Posse

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When ever trying to diagnose or fix any tuning or intonation issues, start with fresh strings that have been stretched as many people have described as above

Strings that have been on the guitar for five months you have had it and heaven knows how long before that at the factory and the store are not a good indicator of if there is a tuning stability problem

a couple of other random thoughts
The tuner posts/machines themselves are very rarely a problem.
on a non locking tuner, using too many string winds on the tuner post giving the string a lot of slack, or not enough winds on the tuner to lock the string in often is a problem

On a locking tuner, locking the string and then adding winds to the post can mean there is slack in the string that can allow it to fall out of tune

If the nut is binding the string (holds the string and then makes a ping sound when there is enough tension on the string to pull it out of the bind) then lubing the nut can help but ultimately a better cut nut would solve this completely
If the nut is not binding the strings then lubing won't do anything for your tuning

But again, Change your strings and strectch them out before you decide if you really have an issues to fix or not

Anecdotally (and depending on how many hours you are putting in), I rarely get more than a month out of a set of strings and usually only around two weeks out of Ernie Balls on my tribute to an AFD

Good luck
Matt
 

TerryH

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This has worked very well for me... Malikon is one of the bests!

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BU0hMu2XcWw]Keep Your Guitar in Tune : changing and stretching new strings - YouTube[/ame]
 

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