Strap Lock Recommendations

LeftyF2003

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This. Requires no modification to the guitar, and they are dirt cheap. You just have to look out for any cracks in the washers, at which point you just change them out. I got a lifetime supply bag of these for around 8 bucks. You can also drink a lot of Grolsh and get a buzz as a bonus. I put them in a ziplock bag to make sure they don't dry out. If they're good enough for Joe B's '59 Lesters they're good enough for me...
 

Natural1

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If those work for you, fine; I've tried several flavors, and have yet to find one that isn't a serious PITA to lock on. Also, I am much more comfortable trusting my instruments to metal than to plastic. And, every one I've seen is synthetic; I know the problem is pretty much vinyl straps on nitro finishes, but I've seen enough gorgeous old guitars scarred by synthetic straps that I only use leather & suede (except the classical, which has woven cotton with leather ends).

I am so sold on Schallers that, when I put buttons on both ends of my classical (as i no longer have a lap to rest them in, and my legs no longer cross.....) I actually considered using Schallers on it.

I have 4 full leather Lock-It straps. Never tried the synthetic ones, but the ends are the same (leather on both). The ends are very stiff to begin with but they do loosen up after a while. Once they break in they are very easy to deal with.
 

MiniB

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That's got to suck....but it looks like he could have lost a finger! They shouldn't have the thing there on what I assume is such a low ceiling over an elevated stage. I probably would have taken it up with the club. Not to sound like a Karen, but man that's dangerous.
Upon second look, that guitar player may have been standing on something like an amp, because everyone else looks to be at ground level in comparison. If that's the case...then yeah he was showing of....then got sawed off. :laugh2:
 
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shupe13

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The original Schallers get my vote.

Just before straplocks were available, my carelessness resulted in an injury some 42 years ago. Not once, but twice (on separate occasions) the strap came undone, resulting in the headstock hitting a hard floor. I was a dopey 16 year old ...

The second time left a mark. Much like an earthquake fault, the wood grain shifted causing a strip of finish to shed, just like a can opener was dragged down the middle. Teutonic separation on a micro scale.

How the Lester survived that is beyond me. The volute maybe? It plays great and stays in tune quite well.

Click image to zoom into the horror show:

37483158034_f87547804b_o.jpg
That is crazy . Freddy Krugered that thang.
 

MiniB

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So definitely no crack in the neck?
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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So definitely no crack in the neck?
Unknown. The luthier who did a fret leveling a while back thought it was in danger. I plan on not dropping it again.

Stays in tune well and I'm able to get it to play quite nicely with minimal adjustments.
 

MiniB

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Unknown. The luthier who did a fret leveling a while back thought it was in danger. I plan on not dropping it again.

Stays in tune well and I'm able to get it to play quite nicely with minimal adjustments.
As long as no rattle or buzz, good to go. Battle scar.
 

MiniB

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That's the thing about Gibson's, they're so fragile. Fenders you could play baseball and dig ditches with and it will still be a player. I had a car accident with two Fenders in my car that would have been just a pile of splinters if they were Gibson's. With the Strat and Tele, there was maybe a nick on one of the necks, hardly even noticeable. Not exaggerating.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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That's the thing about Gibson's, they're so fragile. Fenders you could play baseball and dig ditches with and it will still be a player. I had a car accident with two Fenders in my car that would have been just a pile of splinters if they were Gibson's. With the Strat and Tele, there was maybe a nick on one of the necks, hardly even noticeable. Not exaggerating.
Maybe. I’d suggest the notion of fragile Gibsons is not always entirely true. My poor Lester is proof of that.

A 10+ pound Norlin dropped twice in the same manner surviving is noteworthy. It is a narrow thin neck too.

I will venture a guess that the volute helped. The “fault line” stopped right where the volute started.

As far as Fenders being sturdier, the necks are hard maple. Has to be stronger than mahogany I’d think. Fenders are also generally lighter increasing their chances in an accident.

Another potential weak point guess is the angled back headstock along with a substantial routing for the truss rod. Two failure points Fenders don’t have.

An additional glued scarf joint in the neck at the headstock seems stronger than a contiguous piece of wood. Also a more efficient use of valuable wood.

A Fender neck with its straight neck has an advantage.
 
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MiniB

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Yeah that maple is tough as nails. Simpler/flatter design of course. Not a knock on Gibson's of course, but without doubt I've always felt compelled to be more careful with my Gibsons than Fenders in general, especially when it comes to headstock/neck.

Of course, you're not planning to get into car accidents to test your guitars, but in my case i had two guitars in gig bags and a Deluxe Reverb in my back seat,. and my car hydroplaned and went head-on into a UPS truck, we were both doing probably 30....the impact tore the front wheel out of the truck (it ended up about 80 feet down the road) and completely accordioned my front end. Luckily both me and driver were okay. Upon impact the amp slammed forward into the necks of both guitars. I was expecting to just pull out bags of broken parts but miraculously both guitars were fine, necks weren't all bent up or anything, just a little ding on the Tele, and they tuned up fine. Couldn't believe it.

It makes me shudder to think how my ES-335 or even a Les Paul would have looked like in their place...even in hard cases. But...nature of the beasts. On the other hand...these guitars can be 60+ years old and constantly played, and sound amazing night after night. So in that respect, that's as resilient as it gets.

Yeah I would agree that the volute probably helped.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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Yeah that maple is tough as nails. Simpler/flatter design of course. Not a knock on Gibson's of course, but without doubt I've always felt compelled to be more careful with my Gibsons than Fenders in general, especially when it comes to headstock/neck.

Of course, you're not planning to get into car accidents to test your guitars, but in my case i had two guitars in gig bags and a Deluxe Reverb in my back seat,. and my car hydroplaned and went head-on into a UPS truck, we were both doing probably 30....the impact tore the front wheel out of the truck (it ended up about 80 feet down the road) and completely accordioned my front end. Luckily both me and driver were okay. Upon impact the amp slammed forward into the necks of both guitars. I was expecting to just pull out bags of broken parts but miraculously both guitars were fine, necks weren't all bent up or anything, just a little ding on the Tele, and they tuned up fine. Couldn't believe it.

It makes me shudder to think how my ES-335 or even a Les Paul would have looked like in their place...even in hard cases. But...nature of the beasts. On the other hand...these guitars can be 60+ years old and constantly played, and sound amazing night after night. So in that respect, that's as resilient as it gets.

Yeah I would agree that the volute probably helped.
:eek2:

How did you come out of that?
 

MiniB

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:eek2:

How did you come out of that?
Nothing broken luckily but sore and bruised down my arms. Airbag went off, and when I came to after a second I thought I was on fire because I was exhaling thick white smoke. It was actually smoke from the small amount of explosive used to inflate the airbag so quickly, which had tore. I actually still made it to work that day because we had one of our biggest clients coming in for a video project and I was the editor, so I refused medical attention and had a friend come get me. At the end of the day, I slept on the couch in one of the offices, and the next morning I literally couldn't move a finger and thought I was paralyzed. It was just my body dealing with the shock and I eventually was able to move around.

When I saw the truck's tire down the road, I at first thought it was my amp that had been thrown from the car. Then when I saw it still back there thrown forward against my guitars (a US Reissue Strat and Tele, nice guitars), I was preparing myself for the pile of parts. But they came out fine, even after having a Deluxe Reverb slam into them at over 30 mph. Amp was fine too. Fender built some tough stuff.
 
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