Strap Lock Recommendations

lawrev

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The administrators are free to delete this post. I will do the search.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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I use Dunlops they let your guitar hit the floor.
FIFY

There are 2 acceptable answers to the question: for acoustics, beer washers; for electrics, Schallers.

The Dunlop "push-to-release" design makes failure inevitable; yes, the recessed-button ones are much better than the originals with the protruding button, but the newer ones still can and will be bumped in such a way that they let go - and, since the pin is all that's holding it, that's it. It's "Hello, floor" time. I have seen it happen - way more than once. A Dunlop-equipped guitar is a broken headstock waiting to happen.

With Schallers (which I have put on every one of my own electrics, and every electric I had care of in my roadie days), not only does the pull-to-release design make accidental disengagement pretty much impossible, but with the belt-and-suspenders U-channel on the strap, even if it did fail - which in over 40 years of use I have never seen - your guitar is still secured.
 

smk506

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It doesn’t matter. None of this stuff matters :rofl: .

Buy some Dunlops, install them correctly and check up on them from time to time. Scheduled maintenance.

OR...

Buy some Schallers, install them correctly and check up on them from time to time. Scheduled maintenance.

Either way someone here has had the system fail, and a bunch of people will swear by them as being the most safest, secure option out there. :dunno:

I like Schallers, been using them a long time and feel ‘invested’ in it by way of having so many, but I’ve also had Dunlop’s and fat heads, and had no issues with any of them.

They have all needed some kind of regular or semi regular maintenance though, tightening nuts, screws, whatever. Stay on top of it and you’ll likely have no preventable issues any way you choose.





Fuck those beer washer things though, I’ll never understand their popularity :laugh2:
 

CB91710

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pedecamp

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MSB

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Fuck those beer washer things though, I’ll never understand their popularity :laugh2:

I don't get them either, but #1 it gives someone an excuse to drink a beer, #2, their cheap, which is funny because people will skimp on a $20 strap lock set for their 3k R series guitar....

but like you said, routine maintenance, which is yet another funny thing around here, people will change strings for every gig but then bitch about the 1 time a schaller failed because they toured for 3 months and didn't tighten the nut once...

anyone that loses a LP, or any guitar for that matter, with all the options out there now, is just... missing a few nuts themselves, imo
 

Natural1

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Lock-It straps are just plain excellent. These are the only straps I use. No need to change strap buttons, except maybe vintage style Gibson buttons.

For my reissues I've replaced the vintage style with the modern large mushroom style Gibson buttons. Just always use the original screws and you should have no issues.
 

Duane_the_tub

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I used to do the Dunlops, but these days I just use these....


View attachment 478354
Yup. Rubber washers work perfectly, take about 30 seconds to install/uninstall/swap out, require exactly zero maintenance and have never failed me in 40 years of playing guitar. There is no reason to overthink this one.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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The original Schallers get my vote.

Just before straplocks were available, my carelessness resulted in an injury some 42 years ago. Not once, but twice (on separate occasions) the strap came undone, resulting in the headstock hitting a hard floor. I was a dopey 16 year old ...

The second time left a mark. Much like an earthquake fault, the wood grain shifted causing a strip of finish to shed, just like a can opener was dragged down the middle. Teutonic separation on a micro scale.

How the Lester survived that is beyond me. The volute maybe? It plays great and stays in tune quite well.

Edit: @LtDave32 @Freddy G - ever see anything like this?

Click image to zoom way into the horror show:

 
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CB91710

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Yup. Rubber washers work perfectly, take about 30 seconds to install/uninstall/swap out, require exactly zero maintenance and have never failed me in 40 years of playing guitar. There is no reason to overthink this one.
This.
It's not 1984 anymore.
I don't need something that will hold my guitar to the strap while I swing it over my head.
Strap locks are completely unnecessary for a Strat, SG, 335, or anything else that has a properly designed forward attachment... Les Paul and the original Flying-V designs are two of the few exceptions, and the washers work just fine for those.

I don't have to have a dedicated strap for each guitar, I can use my strap with any guitar (SG/335 and LP/Strat need a different configuration), they don't make noise when there's no tension on the strap, I can borrow a friend's guitar and use my strap.... They simply work.
Cheap? Sure. But I've been removing my old Schallers and going back to regular buttons.
I bought Schallers for a number of my newer guitars and never installed them.
 


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