Sticky Neck Finishes

ehb

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Carnauba. Decades.

 
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Subterfuge

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One more detail which is also important to take into consideration.

Poly is a finish that cures (meaning, there's a chemical reaction and the cured substance is no longer the same chemical composition that the liquid finish once was), but nitro is a finish that never cures (i.e. the solvent evaporates and the solids stay on the surface).

So, many have noted in the past that nitro is "alive" which means that it can change over time, depending on what chemicals it comes in contact with, over time (note that everything is a chemical, so I am not referring exclusively to harsh chemicals).

So, the part of the finish that is always in contact with perspiring skin, such as the lower bout on the bass side, is not going to be the same kind of finish that will be on the treble side, over time. This is important when cleaning and detailing vintage guitars. If we use a harsh cleaning product, such as the Music Nomad Guitar Detailer, we might be surprised to see that the part that was constantly rubbing against the skin turn into a dull, frosted appearance, right after cleaning. That's because the nitro, which is "alive", changed over the decades, as it reacted to the acidity (or whatever) coming from the skin of the player's arm.

One has to be careful when deciding which cleaning products to use on vintage guitars, with nitro finish. They don't all age the same way and it also depends whihc formulation was used in the first place.

That said, in my experience, we should be fine using the Music Nomad Guitar Polish, on sticky Gibson necks, to make them slippery. But if it's a very old Gibson, I don't really know, as results may vary.

Hope this makes sense and hope this helps.
Thanks !!! this explanation was very helpful ..
 

zdoggie

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never had the problem , but I do use virtuoso cleaner and polish maybe thats why.

zdog
 

1Mudman

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The one thing I always do before playing and after playing a guitar is wash my hands and I spray a little mix of alcohol and distilled water on my hands. I take a microfiber cloth and give it a shot of the mix and clean the neck down. Really keeps any gunk and junk from building and the necks are slick! I always wipe them down before putting them up. I play at least 2 guitars a day and sometimes as many as 5. My son, doesnt wash his hands or wiper down neck and frets and his guitars always look like they been through a war. He has dry skin problems but still, I wont pick one of his guitars up! My last 2 new guitars have a satin poly finish I really like. Seems like a painted gloss nitro neck has the most friction to me. But Hey! I still love them.
 

moreles

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IMO, it's not the original finish that's sticky, but something (and there are a few common causes) has created this result. It is sometimes curable in the ways others have mentioned, but in some cases, such as the presence of silicones, the stickiness never goes away for good. A new gloss neck is described by some as sticky, but it's not; it's just a lot of friction between hanbd and surfac e that goes away fast with use, as the neck gets worn. A worn gloss neck is way, way faster than a satin or open-grain neck. Neither are physically sticky.
 

dro

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Whatcha been puttin' on your hands there Scooter?
 


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