Standard vs studio

Oddball667

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....for sure .
I kinda want to try some p-90´s , not in my LP but something , kinda trying to get a Tony Iommi sound and pretty sure thats what his original sg had .
But then again the more and more I look for the "doom metal" sound the more and more I'm feeling like I'd prefer to play blues rock , so at the moment I'm kinda confused on what I want lol.
Not playing for anyone but myself ....so I can literally do whatever I want for the first time since I decided to pick up an instrument .
Kinda liberating .
Suppose the first step is to simply get better at guitar.
....kinda dumb I literally know more about a guitar than I do playing one.
 

redcoats1976

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it seems like your best option is to go try a few standards and see if you think they stack up to your guitar or not.at least then you will know if you are missing anything or not.
 

CB91710

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....actually starting to understand that , it is very odd that Gibson is "Gibson" with such a varied quality of basicly the same guitar , and some are ridiculously priced and others you can basically get for a few hundred bucks and arent really any better than a epiphone , but at the same time there making decent epiphone guitars (I wouldn't really want one but hey) and it also amazed me that les pauls have almost been discontinued , or lost there popularity act but somehow still are one of the most iconic guitars of all time.
Gibson covers a wider span of the market, with ~$500 difference between the Tribute, Classic, Standard, and getting into the $3000+ signature and Custom models.
Fender does the same, with the American Performer line in the $1150 range, up to the American Original and Elite at $2000... signature and custom shop models get into $2500+
Fender has the Mexican production filling the gap between the Asian Squier line, while Gibson fills that gap with the higher end Epiphone Semihollow and Custom models.

But all told, not including Epiphone, there are basically 4 Les Paul models from $1500-$3000, and there are basically 4 Strat models from $1200-$2000.

The variety of models provides something affordable for any buyer wanting a US model and with the ability to get above the import price range.
This is something we did not enjoy in the 70s and 80s.
It was $600 for a Fullerton Strat, about the same for a Les Paul. By the late 80s/early 90s, I was resigned to buying Epiphones because Gibsons were SO far out of reach (ya, at the time, today I have three).
It was a big deal when the Studio was released at less than half the price of a Standard. I almost bought one for my daughter to learn on around '95, but we both liked the Ibanez JS-100 and the body was a better fit for her.


And as the original post questions... there really is not a QUALITY difference between the lines, at least not until you get into CS/VOS and such.
Yes indeed... the primary differences from a Studio/Tribute to a Modern/Original are indeed cosmetic. Color options, flame top, Push-Pull pots, neck binding, inlays, etc...
Sadly, quality is all over the place. My '19 Original 60s is flawless, as is my new Epiphone Bonamassa Custom. Others have received real clunkers... from both Gibson and Epiphone.
And Fender is no different, though I think the Corona production does seem to be more consistent, with dead pickups seeming to be the most common complaint.
 

Oddball667

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it seems like your best option is to go try a few standards and see if you think they stack up to your guitar or not.at least then you will know if you are missing anything or not.
Im not missing anything , i mean i have what I want in my guitar and am completely happy with it .
Was just curious if that was the basic difference .
I mean it makes since to have to oay alittle extra for a figured top , binding and burst or trans finish ECT , just kinda wanted to know if the meat and potatoes of the guitar were essentially the same as fare as sound , build and quality control ect .
I dont think i would feel comfortable with a super figured top and gold hardware and a high gloss finish , almost feel I would baby the guitar and fear scratching it more that this plain wine red studio with dings and wear already lol.
...do kinda wish it had the diamond on the headstock though.
 

Oddball667

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Gibson covers a wider span of the market, with ~$500 difference between the Tribute, Classic, Standard, and getting into the $3000+ signature and Custom models.
Fender does the same, with the American Performer line in the $1150 range, up to the American Original and Elite at $2000... signature and custom shop models get into $2500+
Fender has the Mexican production filling the gap between the Asian Squier line, while Gibson fills that gap with the higher end Epiphone Semihollow and Custom models.

But all told, not including Epiphone, there are basically 4 Les Paul models from $1500-$3000, and there are basically 4 Strat models from $1200-$2000.

The variety of models provides something affordable for any buyer wanting a US model and with the ability to get above the import price range.
This is something we did not enjoy in the 70s and 80s.
It was $600 for a Fullerton Strat, about the same for a Les Paul. By the late 80s/early 90s, I was resigned to buying Epiphones because Gibsons were SO far out of reach (ya, at the time, today I have three).
It was a big deal when the Studio was released at less than half the price of a Standard. I almost bought one for my daughter to learn on around '95, but we both liked the Ibanez JS-100 and the body was a better fit for her.


And as the original post questions... there really is not a QUALITY difference between the lines, at least not until you get into CS/VOS and such.
Yes indeed... the primary differences from a Studio/Tribute to a Modern/Original are indeed cosmetic. Color options, flame top, Push-Pull pots, neck binding, inlays, etc...
Sadly, quality is all over the place. My '19 Original 60s is flawless, as is my new Epiphone Bonamassa Custom. Others have received real clunkers... from both Gibson and Epiphone.
And Fender is no different, though I think the Corona production does seem to be more consistent, with dead pickups seeming to be the most common complaint.
Thats a great answer , kinda figured that was the case .
But thank you for breaking it down and explaining it clearly.
 

redrabit1

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I get what you are saying about your Studio. I have two, a 1983 Studio and a 1985 Studio Standard- they are both very nice guitars and I have had them for years. They both have Tim Shaw pickups- which is the draw for me. Both are case queens and feel and sound terrific, I prefer the '83 personally. The difference in the electronics of a '93 Studio vs. a Standard are pretty large- and the build quality, the neck and the frets of a standard are different from a Studio- not a bad thing at all. I had a real 70's Custom triple and it was a brick- no tone and no sustain and no feel. All that said, I bought a new R8 and there really is no comparison, hands down the R8 is more Les Paul sounding and feeling than the Studio's. My endpoint is, a Standard or a Custom can certainly be a Turd or a Prize and Studios are the same as far as variety goes. In the end if your guitar inspires you to play it, than you have the right instrument.
 

Oddball667

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I get what you are saying about your Studio. I have two, a 1983 Studio and a 1985 Studio Standard- they are both very nice guitars and I have had them for years. They both have Tim Shaw pickups- which is the draw for me. Both are case queens and feel and sound terrific, I prefer the '83 personally. The difference in the electronics of a '93 Studio vs. a Standard are pretty large- and the build quality, the neck and the frets of a standard are different from a Studio- not a bad thing at all. I had a real 70's Custom triple and it was a brick- no tone and no sustain and no feel. All that said, I bought a new R8 and there really is no comparison, hands down the R8 is more Les Paul sounding and feeling than the Studio's. My endpoint is, a Standard or a Custom can certainly be a Turd or a Prize and Studios are the same as far as variety goes. In the end if your guitar inspires you to play it, than you have the right instrument.
Ive actually heard this about Gibson more so than any other guitar company lol.
I dont think my studio will ever when any beauty contest , or be that super "rare" guitar guys are drooling over or anything .
....but it just sounds and plays good , but you definitely know its hanging over your shoulder.
And it definitely makes me WANT to play it .
I think i mentioned in this post I was orginaly going to tune it down to C standard or something (its in D standard now with light slinkys) but after finally getting around to tweaking my floyd rose (wich I don't use or even have the bar for) on this Jackson I bought to hang on the wall and tunning it to C#standard I think ill leave them for now , just to have the two diffrent tunnings and feel.
I can get some really cool buttery tones from the studio , and the dinky just sounds mean and dark now .
Kinda fun to olay around with and I'm guessing is like 7 lbs lighter lol
 

MikeDercole

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I've had a lot of different guitars over the years. I started out with the Chinese crap imitation when I was a kid and had no money to invest in a high end instrument. Over the years I have bought, sold and traded my way up. IMO, yes there is a difference. I started with an SG knockoff in the 70s. Now I have an SG standard. On to epiphone gibsons, where at the high end, the fit and finish was quite impressive on a Black Beauty that I still have. On to studios, tributes and standards ending in a gorgeous Gold Top of my dreams. Through the fenders the same way from an Epi strat (still have) to an elite strat and an Ultra Tele.
I can say from personal experience that there is a difference. Now, that being said, the question is how big of a difference?
I have a studio that I will never sell and an epiphone black beauty that I will never sell. But I pretty much play the Gold Top, strat and tele. I will admit that a lot of the difference is cosmetic, but I think that all of that extra time they put into making them look good translates into exceptional workmanship on the things that really count when you are building a guitar (which I now do as well). Straight necks, bound fretboards, polished frets, etc. There is a big difference in an assembly line item and a hand built item. If you disagree, go ask Rolls Royce about it.
I'm not saying that you can't get a good studio, just the opposite. I love that old Epi Black Beauty and I sold an LP studio that still haunts me. What I am saying is find what sounds and feels good to you and you win. I think it would be easier to find an expensive guitar that speaks to you because of the build quality and time spent with attention to detail that you would hope to find will likely translate into better playability and sound, but that doesn't mean that standards are universally better than studios at all. Or that they are guaranteed to sound better.
I also think that guitars that are a pleasure to see, feel, play and hear will lend themselves to being played much more than just an average guitar. More playing time equals better playing, more exploration, better expression, etc. I just picked up that Tele Ulra and I can't walk through the room without stopping to pick it up, if only for a few minutes. Think about it for a minute. You get a new guitar and you play the hell out of it. You get better because of it. Wow, that must be a magic guitar, lol!
 

Ironliftr3

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I have two Studios, both 1998, a 2011 Traditional, and a 2013 Traditional. Other than the pickups, and the variations you see with any LP, there isn't much difference in any of them (outside of cosmetics/top)

One of the Studios, black with dot inlays, weighs a TON. I believe it is swiss cheese weight relieved, but it's heavier than my 2013 traditional with no weight relief. Dense wood I guess. Hard to tell the difference in tone because of the hotter pickups (490/498 as mentioned above).
 

jk60LPTH

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I've never had a Studio but I've looked at them, and one difference that I haven't seen mentioned here is that the Studios (and I don't know if this holds true for all years) were wired with push-pull pots so you could coil split or coil tap and get different sounds from them... my memory is a little fuzzy on this point, maybe someone who owns a Studio could elaborate?
 

Dirtyclinic

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I agree that the cosmetic differences do not affect the sound of the Studio compared to the Standard (better or worse) but those cosmetic differences do something to me that makes me think the Standard is more bitchin. That being said, I love the Studio and Special and all of those too.
 

tygr1

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Well I'm just a 65 year old retired construction worker getting back into guitars in my old age and retirement years. I just can't think of a better hobby.

So I've assembled a very nice USA Strat and have a couple of really good Epi Les Pauls. But I'm now working on a deal for a near perfect 2002 Gibson Studio. I suppose you all see where this is headed...yes, working my way up again, lol.

The new Gibby prices are just outrageous anymore. I've owned several Gibson Standards and Trad Pros within the past 10 years. None of them were more than $1700. I'm just not ready to lay down $2k plus for a USED Gibby Les Paul with binding!
 

laquer09

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It all depends on the year of the Studio. 82-87, they were built nearly exactly as Standards, just without the inlay and binding aesthetics. They also came out with Studio Custom around the same time which IMO is an entirely different guitar. Then they introduced the Studio Lite, Gem Series (w p90s), SmartWood Series (multiple), and then just a smattering of Les Pauls that are basically only Les Paul in shape...the rest of the build is entirely different from a Standard.

I have an 82 Studio "Standard" and it plays and sounds exactly like a standard from that era, which was a good era for Gibson. I've been playing it since I was 16 and the thing is a force to be reckoned with. I think just like anything else, there are a bunch of factors but it comes down to whether you like playing it or not. They give you a bunch of affordable flavors that are all really cool, but for instance, the Gem series with the P90s sounds nothing like my studio standard. It has a unique tone that sounds very unique (most P90s I see are usually in semi-hollow bodies), but to me does not deliver the power you'd want in a metal band.

Read the history of the Studio, go find the different flavors at local shops and play them (ideally, bring in your amp and fx) and see what you like.
 

keys88

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Studios are perfectly fine guitars. When you buy a car you can buy the base model or the one with all the premium upgrades. It's up to you and your budget. But at the end of the day they both drive the same...
 

judson

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..........
Suppose the first step is to simply get better at guitar.
....kinda dumb I literally know more about a guitar than I do playing one.
:rofl:^^^ that is one of the best lines i have read in MLP and funny how true it is , admitting that to oneself may be difficult, but many will agree their knowledge exceeds their playing skills....sadly i lack equally in both catagories.


Gibson covers a wider span of the market, with ~$500 difference between the Tribute, Classic, Standard, and getting into the $3000+ signature and Custom models.
Fender does the same, with the American Performer line in the $1150 range, up to the American Original and Elite at $2000... signature and custom shop models get into $2500+
Fender has the Mexican production filling the gap between the Asian Squier line, while Gibson fills that gap with the higher end Epiphone Semihollow and Custom models.

But all told, not including Epiphone, there are basically 4 Les Paul models from $1500-$3000, and there are basically 4 Strat models from $1200-$2000.

The variety of models provides something affordable for any buyer wanting a US model and with the ability to get above the import price range.
This is something we did not enjoy in the 70s and 80s.
It was $600 for a Fullerton Strat, about the same for a Les Paul. By the late 80s/early 90s, I was resigned to buying Epiphones because Gibsons were SO far out of reach (ya, at the time, today I have three).
It was a big deal when the Studio was released at less than half the price of a Standard. I almost bought one for my daughter to learn on around '95, but we both liked the Ibanez JS-100 and the body was a better fit for her.


And as the original post questions... there really is not a QUALITY difference between the lines, at least not until you get into CS/VOS and such.
Yes indeed... the primary differences from a Studio/Tribute to a Modern/Original are indeed cosmetic. Color options, flame top, Push-Pull pots, neck binding, inlays, etc...
Sadly, quality is all over the place. My '19 Original 60s is flawless, as is my new Epiphone Bonamassa Custom. Others have received real clunkers... from both Gibson and Epiphone.
And Fender is no different, though I think the Corona production does seem to be more consistent, with dead pickups seeming to be the most common complaint.
great post that gives a basic summary of the differences that many have asked :h5:


and the three studios of mine get more play than many other high dollar gibsons.....they just do the job without the frills..
 

Oddball667

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I've never had a Studio but I've looked at them, and one difference that I haven't seen mentioned here is that the Studios (and I don't know if this holds true for all years) were wired with push-pull pots so you could coil split or coil tap and get different sounds from them... my memory is a little fuzzy on this point, maybe someone who owns a Studio could elaborate?
No , my 93 studio wasn't wired with push pull pots .
To me it seems a stripped down , plain les paul that sounds great
 

mrblooze

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I think Studios from that era had the 490/498 pickup combo.
The acronym PAF is usually used for the original humbuckers made from 1957 to 1960 ish
Of course the word paf is used all over pick up marketing these days.
IMO those Studios from the 90s had a great spec and were authentic to the original concept :
A cosmetically stripped down Standard.
But still a Les Paul where it counted.
I'm not much of a fan of the following models made afterwards.
I have a 2012 Studio Shred. It has (or had, before I changed them out) the 490/498 pups, but the wiring was that pcb. I gutted and replaced that too, but it still sounded great; I changed everything, not because it didn't sound great, but to make it sound the way I wanted.but it compares very well in feel and playability with my '71 Custom (ok, not Gibson's finest year), and as well with most other LP's I've played (though these are the only two LPs I've owned, having been more of a Strat-slinger for the last 30 years...). It's in the hands. A good studio with a set up that works for you will sound as good as most of the highest priced LPs, if you work with it. The main difference in later studios is the synthetic fingerboard. I prefer wood, but the difference between the synthetic and the ebony on a clean channel is very slight, at least, with my studio. Maybe more experienced players have had a different experience..?
 

nortally

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Full disclosure: I don't actually own an LP ;-) My first Gibson-scale guitar was an Epiphone Goth LP Studio. It's an inexpensive guitar, but plays and sounds great. No doubt the pups & hw could be upgraded, although it did come with Grover tuners. At the time of purchase, I was attracted to it because I was used to Fenders and didn't think I wanted neck binding.

Last year when I got the SG bug, I decided that I must have the neck binding, trapezoidal inlays, and P-90s, wound up with a 2016 SG Standard (and paid about $400 over the cost of a comparable Special model).

Love both guitars, and while I'm aware that the SG is worth more, whichever one I'm playing is the one I like best.
 


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