Square nut line

hahnsottis

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Any one else have an issue when hand planing a scarf joint where it seems impossibly to keep the line where the nut goes square?

I don’t have a picture to illustrate this. I’m about to start a new build and have ran into this in the past.

Not sure if I am explaining the issue right, but after cutting the scarf joint, I typically flip the small piece (headstock to be) over, clamp it to the neck so the angles line up and start to plane it flat. The line that would be approximately where the nut goes typically gets (rounded) from square. I’m not great with a hand plane,and that may be my issue, but was wondering if others have run into this and if so, come up with any tricks?
Thanks
 

ExNihilo

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I know exactly what you mean.

I LOVE planing. It is one of the things I enjoy most in a build. I find it to be the best way to perfectly square up and join neck blanks (better than some machine joiners I used). And I have done many scarf joins too. This in not exactly a trick, but what I found by experience is that the most important think about planing is to be OCD about sharpening and keeping the plane tuned (which is not hard or time consuming).

Watch this video and some other ones from this guy. He is very informative. Believe me, when you understand the plane it is amazing how easy they are to use.

 

hahnsottis

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Thanks ExNihilio.
Yes, though I’m not very good at it, I love hand planing too. It’s almost therapeutic.

I think I’ve seen videos from this guy before, he is very good.
A while back I invested in the Lie Nielsen honing Guide (I’m too cheap to buy their actual planes) and since then, my sharpening has improved tremendously.

I haven’t done a scarf joint since, hopefully that will make the difference. If not I’ll post pictures of where I duffed it and ask for more help.
 

emoney

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+1 on the having the blades really, really sharp. Plus, the sandpaper glued onto a piece of marble (etc.) for the final finishing touches has helped me over the years.
 

Blackstar1099

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I use a belt sander. There are times if I'm not paying attention it will skew to one side but I then simply lean it a little over to the other side to square it up again. I then finalize it by hand on a flat surface ready for gluing.
 

hahnsottis

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Blackstar,

Yes, I agree. I have a flat master sander that kind of works likes like a jointer with a long sanding drum. I use that thing more than I care to admit, usually to fix something I totally flubbed with another tool.

I almost feel like I’m cheating when using that. I’d like to be able to pull this off with a hand plane, but the flatmaster is my fall back.

I plan on cutting up some wood this weekend to try it. I pulled out a large mahogany board from my stash the other night, hoping to joint the edge and get a few quartersawn blanks out of it and to my suprise, the face is quartersawn. Should get more necks than I thought!
 

moreles

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The comments about getting the plane blade sharp and true are... sharp and true. I have developed good skills for most processes, but planing is not one of them, to my dismay. I, too, use a belt sander, and I have been able to execute this and other steps very well on that machine, but planing is, for this and some other steps, so, so much better. Getting a straight, true line is pretty much a product of excellent tooling and careful execution. Easier said than done!
 

pshupe

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Also keep in mind that when you look at a one piece neck, before you taper the neck and cut out the head stock shape, it is quite wide. You can drive yourself crazy trying to get that edge perfectly 90 degrees to the edge. TBH you are only really worried about 1 11/16" in the centre of the neck. If it is slightly off it may not matter for that middle short section.

Having said that using a hand plane is the way to go to make that line crisp and accurate. I have used my big jointer to square up a head stock. Especially if you have not cut the neck to length. You can take quite a few passes making sure to keep the edge of the neck blank up against the fence that is perpendicular to the cutting head.

You can also use low number grit sand paper on a sanding block to take it down enough. Again you only have to worry about the width of the nut.

Cheers Peter.
 

hahnsottis

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So the weekend is just about here. I finally got a little start on this head stock. I started squaring the rough lumber for the neck and sharpening my planes. I have a really nice #7 plane that is absolutely the wrong plane for this job. Unfortunately, all my other planes are low quality.
Here is where I am at:
MBoardPlanedAndSquare.JPG


turned out to be a beautiful piece of Mahogany with a little ribboning. When it started it looked like the board on the right (the other half of this board:
MPlanedandSquare.JPG

later this weekend I will resaw it and cut it into 4 pieces. Hoping to get 4 necks if I glue ears on the headstocks.

Anyway, the point of the post was the planing, so I sharpened my blades. Here is my little sharpening jig I made:

SharpeningJig.JPG


the blocks help set the sharpening angle and the leather strop is for after the water stones.

Here is what the blade looks like after a little work:

MSharpenedBlade.JPG


Tested the plane on a piece of scrap. Shavings are as thick as the board so that is a good start:

MShaving.JPG


Just as a comparison to the board:
MShavingWidth.JPG


Looks good to me, but I'm no expert. Once I resaw the board and cut the scarf joint, we'll see if this helps.
 

hahnsottis

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Slow progress this weekend.
I was able to get in the shop a little yesterday. Built a tall fence for the tablesaw and started to resaw the board:
MTSResaw.JPG


Then over to the bandsaw to complete the resaw:
MBSResaw.JPG

Here are the rough boards:
MRoughtCut.JPG


One benefit of using a hand plane, you can clean this sort of thing up before you could even roll out the power planer and turn on the dust extractor. Here is the number 7 plane making short work of this:
MNo7.JPG

another benefit is, rather than a lung full of sawdust, you get this:
MFistFullOShavings.JPG


Here are the two boards face planed:
M2boards.JPG


And ripped into 4 neck blanks:

M4NeckBlanks.JPG


Im going to try to cut and glue the scarf today, but probablly wont be able to get to the actual question (the nut line) for a few weeks. Couple of business trips in the way.
 




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