Sources for quality sandpaper for finishing

BrianH

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
519
Reaction score
215
everything I see on Amazon doesn’t seem to be p rated. Where do you guys get 1000-3000 grits for decent price?
 

syco

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2022
Messages
475
Reaction score
632
In Oklahoma ..... O'reilley's , Autozone , Lowes , Home depot , Wal-mart , Target . Usually not in stock , but can be ordered . I get most of mine from Grainger .
 
  • Like
Reactions: Who

Skyjerk

Sausages
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,435
Reaction score
10,259
Here is where I get paper for woodworking and bladesmithing both :)

 

TheX

Follower of the Tao of Edro
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
42,536
Reaction score
101,602
I buy my Micro-Mesh from Amazon.
 

Ripthorn

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
2,065
Reaction score
2,038
I buy bulk sandpaper from various places, depending on my specific needs. Online industrial supply for wet/dry, klingspor for belts, Mirka gold for standard sheets and RO discs.
 

LtDave32

President and founder of H.U.G.E.
Super Mod
Silver Supporting Member
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
52,242
Reaction score
179,700
I've been using this stuff (in several grits, search on amazon for bulk packs in grits of 1000, 1500, etc etc) for quite a while. Excellent quality, good price:


I don't use the 600 for fine finishing. I use it before the final flow coat of lacquer for leveling and getting rid of that built up layer of orange peel before spraying the final coats.

After the last coat is applied, I go 1000 to 1500 to 2000, then begin the buffing process.
 

Skyjerk

Sausages
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,435
Reaction score
10,259
I don't use the 600 for fine finishing. I use it before the final flow coat of lacquer for leveling and getting rid of that built up layer of orange peel before spraying the final coats.

After the last coat is applied, I go 1000 to 1500 to 2000, then begin the buffing process.
I thought you got a buffing machine?
 

cmjohnson

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,301
Reaction score
3,040
Indasa, Mirka, and ASC abrasives are what I have usually used and I really love the ASC Gold cloth backed fine grades that run up to 3000 grit. For the final sanding before polishing, they are the way to go. They make the final polish a very quick process.

I've always found that time spent sanding to a higher grit pays off with a reduction in polishing time and effort. While I CAN begin compounding and polishing at a 1000 grit finish, it's totally worth it to sand through the grits all the way to 3000 and then polishing takes almost seconds.
 

the great waldo

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
569
Reaction score
364
Try Kovax assilex. It's not cheap but lasts a long time and can be washed and used again. In 45 years of sanding it's the best i've come across. Only shame is I came across it 3 months before I retired. The (velcro soft backed stuff is wonderfull) the self adhesive backed tends to clog a little. Used for dry sanding so you can see whats going on .
Cheers
Andrew
 

Skyjerk

Sausages
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,435
Reaction score
10,259
I do.

That's the buffing process.

mine is a bit less work.

600 on an orbital sander before final flow coat
then 600 on orbital sander again after the cure time.

800 wet sanding by hand. This is the only grit hand sanding I do.

then straight to buffer with medium and fine compound.

finish with some mirror glaze swirl remover etc.

gives me this. it’s about as nice a finish as I’ve ever gotten

I was a bit dubious myself at first I could get a decent finish without all the elbow grease, but
B. Howard said as much, and I respected his opinion enough to give it a try, so I gave it a go and was quite pleased.


2800A934-9F69-48D7-AF3E-A70A40E9E257.jpeg
047FDE37-DF19-48E8-B882-B3B7ECAB6645.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Skyjerk

Sausages
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,435
Reaction score
10,259
Indasa, Mirka, and ASC abrasives are what I have usually used and I really love the ASC Gold cloth backed fine grades that run up to 3000 grit. For the final sanding before polishing, they are the way to go. They make the final polish a very quick process.

I've always found that time spent sanding to a higher grit pays off with a reduction in polishing time and effort. While I CAN begin compounding and polishing at a 1000 grit finish, it's totally worth it to sand through the grits all the way to 3000 and then polishing takes almost seconds.



It sounds like you are saying you spend hours wet sanding by hand to save minutes on the buffer.

The whole reason I bought the buffer in the first place was to reduce the time and effort getting a nice finish. Why would I try and ease the burden for the buffer.
 
Last edited:

LtDave32

President and founder of H.U.G.E.
Super Mod
Silver Supporting Member
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
52,242
Reaction score
179,700
My whole reason for buying a buffing arbor was to aid in getting micro scratches out.
 

Ripthorn

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
2,065
Reaction score
2,038
Try Kovax assilex. It's not cheap but lasts a long time and can be washed and used again. In 45 years of sanding it's the best i've come across. Only shame is I came across it 3 months before I retired. The (velcro soft backed stuff is wonderfull) the self adhesive backed tends to clog a little. Used for dry sanding so you can see whats going on .
Cheers
Andrew
I've used this stuff on my last few builds as well. I failed to mention it above, but it is pretty great. I love the dry sanding aspect of it, but it isn't cheap, as you say. Still, great stuff.
 

cmjohnson

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,301
Reaction score
3,040
It doesn't take hours wet sanding with those papers. It's actually a very quick process. I use the velcro backed papers and do the initial sanding with a random orbital sander, at low speed. I avoid corners and edges. I can even use this on carved tops, WITH CARE.

I follow the PRS sanding methods religiously. They do power sand before polishing. So do I, as it's compatible with the finish type I usually use. I sand dry, not wet, and replace the papers frequently. I let the shiny (unsanded) spots in the finish tell me when I'm done with the initial level-out sanding. They disappear when that grit has done its job. Now it's on to the next grit, and it's just to sand down the scratches left by the previous grit. Repeat the process until you have run through all grits.

All corners and edges are done only by hand and only with very fine grits. If I may sand out the flat back of the body starting with 800 grit on the ROS, I won't touch a corner or edge with anything less than 1500 or 2000 grit and touch that only by hand, literally one stroke of the paper at a time, to avoid any possibility of sand-thru.
 

Ripthorn

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
2,065
Reaction score
2,038
I throw the entire guitar (edges, corners, and all) into a concrete mixer filled with #2 sized crushed stone and let it tumble for an hour

comes out smoooooooth!
Close enough for rock and roll!
 

Latest Threads



Top