Soldering a neutrik angled jack help.

Brek

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Damn, what a struggle, there is so much metal by the time the solder melts the plastic shielding has also. Any suggestions?
 

ARandall

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Thats where the hot iron and the right solder + the technique etc comes into play.

Not to put too much of a fine point of it, but you are not known for your soldering skills (yet). Maybe look to some tutorials and practice first on basic joint technique so you have the process down pat. Then move onto the tricky joints afterwards.
 

Brek

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Lol, yes, really not skilled, OK with pots now, but damn that’s one big heatsink.
 

Roxy13

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Yes, one of my friends was having trouble with some too and finally had to bring them to me lol. He threw quite a few across the garage first.
 

Brek

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not quite at that stage, I am using rosin solder, its getting a bit sticky once you use so much on a joint, might have to get some paste.
 

Martijn R.

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As mentioned practice makes perfect, I expect many people have their own way and preference. I was thought by my father when i was 12 or so. I am unsure on the correct wording in English so here goes. I use tin or solder with rosin core or whatever I have laying around.

What works for me is to first put tin on the wire so the bare copper has a thin layer of tin on it. Even if the wire is already tinned I still refresh with new tin.

The next step is to put a tin on the joints of the jack, I add tin as soon as I touch the joint with the iron, the tin will increase the contact surface so the heat can spread. On the joint I try cover the surface with tin just a tiny bit larger then the size of the wire but not by much. After that is done I prefer to let it cool down before I join the two together otherwise the whole jack is likely to get heated to the point where plastic will start to melt.

Once it is cooled I reheat the joint and add the wire, keep heating so the tin flows on both parts and add tin if needed but not to much, remove the iron, let it cool and keep still. If you do not keep still the tin will harden with a matte look, this can mean there are cracks in the tin. The tin should preferably harden with a shiny look. Another thing to remember is that to much tin is not ideal, a big blob is not needed. The wire should touch the joint as much as possible with not a lot of tin between the two.

This is my technique, might not work for everyone. Hope it is at least of some help.
 

Brek

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As mentioned practice makes perfect, I expect many people have their own way and preference. I was thought by my father when i was 12 or so. I am unsure on the correct wording in English so here goes. I use tin or solder with rosin core or whatever I have laying around.

What works for me is to first put tin on the wire so the bare copper has a thin layer of tin on it. Even if the wire is already tinned I still refresh with new tin.

The next step is to put a tin on the joints of the jack, I add tin as soon as I touch the joint with the iron, the tin will increase the contact surface so the heat can spread. On the joint I try cover the surface with tin just a tiny bit larger then the size of the wire but not by much. After that is done I prefer to let it cool down before I join the two together otherwise the whole jack is likely to get heated to the point where plastic will start to melt.

Once it is cooled I reheat the joint and add the wire, keep heating so the tin flows on both parts and add tin if needed but not to much, remove the iron, let it cool and keep still. If you do not keep still the tin will harden with a matte look, this can mean there are cracks in the tin. The tin should preferably harden with a shiny look. Another thing to remember is that to much tin is not ideal, a big blob is not needed. The wire should touch the joint as much as possible with not a lot of tin between the two.

This is my technique, might not work for everyone. Hope it is at least of some help.
thanks, useful info, i will give it a go.
 

Brek

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still practising, and still getting shitty results just tried again and on a straight neutrik and joint went matt straight away. looks bad. thinking solder is cheap and may not be helping, also sussed out that tip is very hard to 'tin', i think tip wasn't tinned when i did that joint just now which probably means heat wasn't getting to where it needed to be. what thickness solder should i use for cable joints? this thin stuff feels too thin.
 
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ARandall

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Thickness just means you apply different volume of solder for a given length you feed in. Small joints or PCB connections are better with small/thin as small/narrow is the typical area of the joint, and you don't want to risk flooding the area and possibly connecting 2 closely adjacent traces.

What is your practice on? Practice soldering on standard metal parts, or solder basic components together. Its easy enough to go to an electronics shop and buy cheap stuff.

There is nothing about the thickness that will lead to a better or worse soldering joint. In short, your technique is still the issue.
 

Brek

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I am practising on old jack plugs, old pots, I am thinking the solder I have is crap, it melts, nice and shiny, and then instant it sets goes dull, plus this so called 60w station is also suspect, I just tried my old 30w and it delivered more heat and actually got a joint done. Cannot find the solder someone recommended on here in the U.K. but I really want some to try, also need to order a proper not Chinese crap station. However funds are running low, so need to off load something to spend on new stuff. Ref technique, I know what should be happening, enough heat delivered in one shot to melt solder by heat conduction through the part being soldered to without said part getting hot else where, which is where the contact time comes in, with my present setup it’s taking too long to heat the area being soldered to. I have in years past soldered without issues, so very annoyed right now with it all lol.
 
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cooljuk

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If I remember right, your soldering iron has been used on leaded, lead-free, and plastic, at least. If it's the same iron/tip, you'll want to replace the tip. Irons, or at least tips, should no co-mingle between leaded and lead-free solder (not solder of the jewelry or plumbing types). One tip = one type of solder.

New tip
Clean tip
Correct shape/size tip for the work
HOT iron that HOLDS heat
Kester 44 solder

There's no solder joint in a guitar/pedal/amp/etc. that you shouldn't be able to get done in under 5 seconds. Even the chassis ground on a steel amp chassis should be done as such with the right tool for the job.
 

Brek

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hey man thanks. kester thats the stuff i want, and will checkout those vids. Edit: checked them out very useful indeed. Going to stick with the 30w iron and will order some new tips for it, will see if I can send the ‘station’ back as it sucks.
 
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Lester

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I was taught long ago that with a large component, you are better off with a large iron (or relatively high wattage setting on a variable iron) and going in fast and hot.

Using too small an iron leaves you heating up the connector for a long time and that heat travels throughout. A hi-watt iron will quickly heat up just the spot you need so you can solder - before heat travels to the rest of the component.
 

Brek

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After watching the above vids and doing more reading, yes I need a much higher temp station. I read some wrong info on a forum about the temps needed to melt solder, the temps stated were like 200 deg cel, which is what I used when choosing iron, which is just not working, the station I have goes to 480 which is fine for small joints like straight connectors, I have now read that you need to use 700 deg cel for larger surfaces. 2 second rule for contact time is what I am aiming for.
 

ARandall

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5 seconds is about the right time. If you go for 2 seconds then you're going to have the temp on the 'too high to make a quality joint' even for larger areas. You'll simply destroy components if you use super high heat on smaller components.
As mentioned in your first thread on the matter.....a guaranteed 380-400 deg celcius is about ideal - even for things like pot backs.
 

Brek

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The high temps I was only going to use on the angled jacks, is that ok? But Yeah, absolutely not going to use those temps anywhere near a component. Thanks for your continued help.
 

ARandall

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If you have used excess temps already and you're getting melting, then I'd be taking that on board.
But now I'm thinking its more the unit you're using and its inability to do what it is supposed to be doing at the temperature you nominally have it set at. Quite frankly I'd be putting more of the issue down to it not being 'right'.

I think if you stumped up for a good iron (when funds allow) most of your issues will magically disappear......its that much of a change believe me.
 

Brek

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Yes, pretty much drawn same conclusion, the station gets hot, but cannot solder the big neutrik, the 30w solders straight ones fine. I have found a good online retailer in the U.K. cpc farnell who seller everything I need. So when my cash reserves have built up again will by a good station.
 


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