So, I'm thinking of removing my sideways vibrato...

Monstronaut

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2011
Messages
181
Reaction score
139
Because it makes my '63 SG/Les Paul a pain in the arse to play. It doesn't work as a vibrato, the string spacing is too close together, the strings hit the bridge at a shallow angle which I don't like and it kills sustain to my ear. I don't feel too bad about modding the guitar as it's already had a heel reset and a cavity crack but seriously, what were they thinking!!

Anyone want to buy a sideways vibrola!!:fingersx:
 

David Mccarroll

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2011
Messages
1,776
Reaction score
1,269
I'll pass on buying the vibrola (although to be honest with you I think if you chose to sell it you'd probably get enough to buy another guitar!), but having done the same thing it is the best thing you will EVER do for your SG!

They really are one of the worst mistakes in electric guitar history!

Cheers, and I say: go for it!
 

mdubya

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
23,214
Reaction score
42,615
cfd90520.jpg
 

Dolebludger

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
17,232
Reaction score
17,485
Yeah, I've seen those vibratos go for over $500 on ebay. Maybe even more, a it is a long time since I looked. I agree about them sucking tone. I'm trying to keep mine as stock as possible though, but I can sure see somebody going the other way.
 

Monstronaut

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2011
Messages
181
Reaction score
139
I wouldn't remove it if this was a collectors grade guitar but it's not and never will be. As I said, it's a poor piece of engineering, it detracts from the tone and playability of the guitar. Im sure thats not the case with all of them, but this one, with its shallow neck angle which means that the strings are level with the bridge and therefore slip off when bending, deserves to be played. I do around 100 gigs a year and I plan on making this my no.1.
 

Kevin James

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
1,516
Reaction score
1,170
I wouldn't remove it if this was a collectors grade guitar but it's not and never will be. As I said, it's a poor piece of engineering, it detracts from the tone and playability of the guitar. Im sure thats not the case with all of them, but this one, with its shallow neck angle which means that the strings are level with the bridge and therefore slip off when bending, deserves to be played. I do around 100 gigs a year and I plan on making this my no.1.

I actually really like the tone my sidepull 61 has. It's definitely different than my lyre equiped 62 and 65 SG's. Not saying better or worse, just different. I like it. I also have no tuning problems with light use.
 

strat1701

El Diablo Cazador De Hombres
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
6,828
Reaction score
8,849
I have one as well on mine (a '62). My only beef with it is the arm when fully back overlaps the output jack hole so I have to have my arm up a tad to get a cord in the jack. While I wouldn't fully remove it, I may unscrew the top 'folding' part of the bar since I don't use it anyway. It's your guitar, if you say it's not collector quality (perhaps there are repair issues?) then go for it. Mine is all original save for a volume pot change, so mine won't be having any crazy mods!
 

Monstronaut

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2011
Messages
181
Reaction score
139
I did, pics to follow once I figure out the best way to cover the holes. Any ideas are welcome. The guitar now rings like crazy, more than any guitar I've ever owned, including my '56 junior which I had with me and did comparisons. I'm very happy with the results. I just need a decent case. Any recommendations?
 

jeggz

V.I.P. Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Messages
3,967
Reaction score
4,084
Nice!
I'd just leave the holes,unless they large.
 

used guitars

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
86
Reaction score
207
I did, pics to follow once I figure out the best way to cover the holes. Any ideas are welcome. The guitar now rings like crazy, more than any guitar I've ever owned, including my '56 junior which I had with me and did comparisons. I'm very happy with the results. I just need a decent case. Any recommendations?

man, sorry i'm seeing this late. i could have helped you greatly, and frankly; i'm surprised someone else didn't.
 

ColdCobra

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
676
Reaction score
317

LOL very cryptic

I've never read a good thing about those sideways vibratos. So you probably did the wise thing.

I too would just leave the holes, especially if its a player. Adds to the vintage mojo
 

thewestwon

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2012
Messages
10
Reaction score
8
man, sorry i'm seeing this late. i could have helped you greatly, and frankly; i'm surprised someone else didn't.

I'm really interested in this. If you have any setup tips, I'd love to know them. I've recently acquired one that needs some setup attention.
 

Dolebludger

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
17,232
Reaction score
17,485
Monstoraut,

If you removed the original side pull trem, did you install a TP? Probably, you did. And, if so, have you checked if the original trem would cover the new holes for the TP? If so, you may want to re-install the original trem if you want to sell someday, and if the collector's value for these guitars ever goes back up.

Considering all this, you may want to just fill the trem holes with water-based wood filler, and smooth it out with a wet rag when it is almost dry. Then let the filler fiully dry. Then get some red cherry dye from a pro paint store, and dye the filler with a very small paint brush. Then apply a small amount of super glue over the filled and dyed trem holes with another very small paint brush. When dry, smooth lightly with 00000 steel wool, and wax over. If done correctly, the guitar should look fine on stage, but it will remain easy to find should you ever want to put the original trem back on. Keep the original trem, just in case.
 

Latest Threads



Top