Simple Wiring Question I CANNOT Find an Answer For...

endial

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Seems In every wiring video or description or 'how to' I've seen, 20 or 22 gauge TINNED wire is used for both the ground circuit for the pots, and for the ground to bridge post wire. It would seem that this wire is the first wire roll that anyone gets at electronics school graduation as a rite of passage gift, or something, and they all have tons of it. Like it's stinking toilet paper. I have none of this particular wire but plenty of non-tinned copper. Stranded and solid.

What's the deal?

Further details are that I have a semi-hollow that has a broken ground wire (to bridge) and before I pull the bridge anchor, I'd like to know what to put in there.

Edumacate me. Thanks.
 

ARandall

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Its simple stuff that is low cost and doesn't require stripping once cut to length. As ground wire doesn't need insulating from touching ground why would you bother as a big manufacturer with more expensive and fiddly hookup wire - no sense at all.
And as wiring diagrams tend to follow what is used in guitars (lets face it 99% of time you are trying to replicate/replace an already set in stone setup) then the use in the diagram becomes obvious.

And once you actually take apart a guitar and try and poke wire through the typical tiny bridge ground drilling, you'll very quickly see why they don't bother (or more accurately can't) use insulated wire there.

The main question here is - why do you seem so offended by the widespread use of that wire??
 

endial

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Its simple stuff that is low cost and doesn't require stripping once cut to length. As ground wire doesn't need insulating from touching ground why would you bother as a big manufacturer with more expensive and fiddly hookup wire - no sense at all.
And as wiring diagrams tend to follow what is used in guitars (lets face it 99% of time you are trying to replicate/replace an already set in stone setup) then the use in the diagram becomes obvious.

And once you actually take apart a guitar and try and poke wire through the typical tiny bridge ground drilling, you'll very quickly see why they don't bother (or more accurately can't) use insulated wire there.

The main question here is - why do you seem so offended by the widespread use of that wire??
Not offended at all. Frustrated that I couldn't find a simple direct answer. More to the point, why not just use copper for the ground to bridge wire? Untinned. I'm sure I could muster the skill to tin the end of it.

I seriously wondered if it was something beyond the convenience of having to tin the wire ones' self at the contact points. Corrosion, perhaps?
 

ARandall

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You do realise you don't have to follow the wiring diagram to the letter.....its not like you're 'attempting a magic spell' or something.

Big volume guitar makers used cheap stuff simply for practicality
It made sense for them buying in bulk and for speedy operations. A wire that needs no cutting to length at each solder point and can simply be soldered anywhere along its length is ideal. 1 snip at the end and an easy bend to whatever angle is required.
Got a small hole like like a bridge ground - use either the same size or a small wire as suits. The fact that it too can be cut to length and soldered wherever it needs to be works for that scenario too as you have flexibility for things like semihollows where you might need to solder it to the wiring when the harness is still outside the guitar.

Its really nowhere near as complicated as you're trying to make it.
 

LtDave32

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Not offended at all. Frustrated that I couldn't find a simple direct answer. More to the point, why not just use copper for the ground to bridge wire? Untinned. I'm sure I could muster the skill to tin the end of it.

I seriously wondered if it was something beyond the convenience of having to tin the wire ones' self at the contact points. Corrosion, perhaps?
The reason it's everywhere it simple.

It's very easy to solder, being tinned.

It's all through the wire, because with different wiring techniques, one sometimes breaks the cloth covering, pushes back the cloth and makes a solder point without breaking the wire in its path. You can easily make a connection point along any place in the wire.

Furthermore, at any place you cleanly cut off the wire, the end is already tinned. This can be a huge help when you're trying to solder in tight places.
 

endial

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Its really nowhere near as complicated as you're trying to make it.
I've never been accused of that before. :rolleyes:

Thanks for your help, gentlemen. I guess I can relax now.

And, LtDave32, I think that was the answer I was looking for, ultimately.
 


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