Should I??

Nickzephead92

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Hey everyone,

I recently acquired a Les Paul from a dishonest seller online. I asked tons of questions before purchasing all of which he lied about. The bridge is bottomed out at 5/64ths at the 12th fret, the neck has a slight twist, there are 9 high frets and the guitar buzzes and/or chokes out on most notes on the neck. He keeps changing his story, changing his opinions and making up excuses. He WON'T take the guitar back and sent me a small amount back to get the guitar worked on. Even then, it isn't enough money for the work and I wasn't looking for a project. It's driving me nuts to say the least. I don't have any protection on the transaction so should I call him out as a "buyer beware" online? I don't want anyone else buying from this guy and getting into issues. He does not seem to be at all reliable.

Thanks!
 

Mockbel

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Yes, exposing this seller is the least he deserves. However, I wonder why you don’t have any protection or right to ask for a full refund and return the guitar
 

integra evan

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There's always two sides to the story.
Don't want to call anyone out prematurely.
Probably a misunderstanding. Seems they tried to make something right by sending some money back.
 

danzego

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Hey everyone,

I recently acquired a Les Paul from a dishonest seller online. I asked tons of questions before purchasing all of which he lied about. The bridge is bottomed out at 5/64ths at the 12th fret, the neck has a slight twist, there are 9 high frets and the guitar buzzes and/or chokes out on most notes on the neck. He keeps changing his story, changing his opinions and making up excuses. He WON'T take the guitar back and sent me a small amount back to get the guitar worked on. Even then, it isn't enough money for the work and I wasn't looking for a project. It's driving me nuts to say the least. I don't have any protection on the transaction so should I call him out as a "buyer beware" online? I don't want anyone else buying from this guy and getting into issues. He does not seem to be at all reliable.

Thanks!
5/64 at the 12th and the bridge is bottomed out? That’s wild. No offense, just checking to see, do you have experience setting neck relief? What is it at currently?
 

questionman

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I would say yes however devils advocate, without knowing any sort of details of what was posted and what the seller said, the seller may have considered it totally fine and never picked up on those issues.
 

CB91710

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Source? Reverb? Ebay? MLP? Craigslist?

If Reverb and Ebay, regardless of what the seller states, if it is not as described, the platforms *will* back you up on a dispute.

If Craigslist, you're screwed.

If MLP, the mods will do what they can, but ultimately, if the seller refuses to budge, the only thing they can do is block them from the classifieds in the future
This person hasn't been here since March 15, but he remains active on at least one of the sister sites.
 

Nickzephead92

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5/64 at the 12th and the bridge is bottomed out? That’s wild. No offense, just checking to see, do you have experience setting neck relief? What is it at currently?
Yes, I for sure do. The relief is absolutely perfect and I have also had a pretty amazing luthier look at it. He would need to do quite a bit of work.
 

Nickzephead92

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Source? Reverb? Ebay? MLP? Craigslist?

If Reverb and Ebay, regardless of what the seller states, if it is not as described, the platforms *will* back you up on a dispute.

If Craigslist, you're screwed.

If MLP, the mods will do what they can, but ultimately, if the seller refuses to budge, the only thing they can do is block them from the classifieds in the future
This person hasn't been here since March 15, but he remains active on at least one of the sister sites.
This exact situation as in an off-site transaction. I have done plenty of deals directly with a seller and never had any troubles until now. It wasn't a deal done through MLP, but I think revealing who the seller is may aide others here. The guy has all positive feedback on Reverb but it is mostly as a buyer.
 

grumphh

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The bridge is bottomed out at 5/64ths at the 12th fret, the neck has a slight twist, there are 9 high frets and the guitar buzzes and/or chokes out on most notes on the neck.
Yup, sounds about right for a Gibson :laugh2:

No, wait...

...on one hand you claim the "action is to high" and the next second the guitar buzzes and "chokes out" on the frets...

I am inclined to believe that no "dishonest seller" actually exists.
 

grumphh

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I don’t see why both can’t be true.

You can deck the bridge, adjust the truss rod, and have the action still too high. Then you can fret a string at say the fifth fret and get a buzz. Or do a bend at the 15th and have the note die.
Yeah, happens all the time when the action is to high, the notes totally fret out and buzz like mad when you play them - sure thing :yesway:

Especially on a guitar neck where the "relief is perfect" - that really is when high action makes notes buzz and fret out.
The relief is absolutely perfect ...

...are we sure that the action is all that is high in here????
 

LocoTex

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Nickzephead92

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Yeah, happens all the time when the action is to high, the notes totally fret out and buzz like mad when you play them - sure thing :yesway:

Especially on a guitar neck where the "relief is perfect" - that really is when high action makes notes buzz and fret out.



...are we sure that the action is all that is high in here????
It's called high frets and a neck twist. Maybe you've heard of other things that can go wrong with a guitar aside from action and a truss rod adjustment, but from your comments, I doubt it.
 
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grumphh

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It's called high frets and a neck twist. Maybe you've heard of other things that can go wrong with a guitar aside from action and a truss rod adjustment, but from your comments, I doubt it.
Of course.
Frets just pop out of gibson boards like there was no tomorrow.
And they pop out so high that even with an already absurdly high action the guitar still buzzes and chokes out.
And credit must go to gibson, because even with a badly warped neck relief can still be adjusted to perfection.

Yeah, i don't know what i was thinking, your story sounds totally credible now that i think about it. Sorry man. :yesway:
 

grumphh

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Grumphh, You can't envision any possibility where a guitar like the one pictured below could have the relief set well (fretboard level or slightliy concave) using the truss rod, but still can't buzz or fret out if the action is high?

View attachment 551687
No.
If your strings are to high above the fretboard (which is what "high action" means), and the neck is adjusted fine and straight longitudinally - then strings do neither buzz nor fret out/choke. Regardless of the warp.

Actually, once people approach the "warp" logically they will realize that it is functionally no different from a compound radius fretboard, every string just has its own angle in regards to the body of the guitar.
Of course OCD prevents most people from ever realizing this - the guitar in your pic looks terrible, yes, true, but is probably just fine to play :)

...in case you don't believe me (and why would you? Denying facts is far more fun on the internet :yesway: ) just notice how the neck in your pic is actually half of a "double wide compound fretboard", with a small radius at the head, and a large radius at the body end...
 

Dilver

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Deceitful humans…. Some people won‘t think twice about screwing somebody over. It’s usually the serial gear flippers - I hate flippers. The guy the OP bought it from probably got it that way and has been looking to unload it. I believe in Guitarma - treat people well in your dealings, and good things will come to you. Screw somebody over, and the universe will deliver you a broken headstock.

If the seller really did lie, expose him - for everyone else’s protection. If he’s got another side to the story, he’ll speak up and defend himself
 

My20cents_worth

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Sure it’s not a Chibson? I’ve seen a few that look the part but have some major playability issues like the photo. Surely even Gibson wouldn’t let it out like that.
 

zdoggie

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I have to go along with dilver on this one ,well said .

zdog
 

DBDM

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My advice, pack up the guitar and send it to Joe Glaser in Nashville. He is considered "the best" by many who know. He charges about $250 plus materials for his services and is your best bet to get it playing and playing right. The $250 is for the Plek machine he owns. He has the technology to get it straight within 1/1000th of an inch (and that is not an exaggeration). He MAY send it back saying it is unfixable but this is HIGHLY unlikely. I have seen him repair guitars that were literally under water.
 

blouie

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This exact situation as in an off-site transaction...
Hate to say it but there is an assumed risk with off-site transactions and you took that risk! I have only done it once and it was a $3,000 risk but I count myself lucky!
 


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