Should I trade my 01 R9 for a 2020 Murphy lab R9?

rockstar232007

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I knew that was true for Braz fretboards but I never thought about the Hog before. So the 2001 would not have Honduran then.
Nope. The CITES/Endangered Species Act was enacted n the early '70s (thanks hippies, lol), but Gibson started stopping the use of Honduran hog, and BRZ RW in the mid '60s.

Everything after that was Fijin Hog.
 

Cory

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No offence here but your post is all wrong. People who buy guitars as investments, and they do whether you agree with it or not, want 100% originality.
^^^ this - had a HM (from a 2018 R9) that I decided to sell to fund something else and took a serious wash on it…more than I’d care to admit
 

spartacus slim

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Gibson confirmed that it’s a 99 as of yesterday. plus I bought it before 09……what’s wrong with the inlays? My friend bought it new in 01 and had to be nos at that point.
1999 R9 inlay shape and material:

8A9DAB0C-9A49-4CBA-A148-A15F49D813B2.jpeg


2009 R9 inlay shape and material:

8E47E0A0-3ACD-47F1-91AF-7EEBF00DD79A.jpeg
D4BF1260-688E-4074-B8FB-5F63EABFD275.jpeg


2019 R9 inlay shape and material:

0A9B4154-92C7-4783-ACEF-A345EB9ABD77.jpeg
 
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Pancreas

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Hi guys. Just curious about the pros and cons of the new Murphy’s. My r9 is not a verified Brazilian but it is a highly figured lemon burst. No real patina to brag about and no binding bleed. It is bone stock. The Murphy is a bourbon looking burst that is nearly unplayed. prices are all over the place on eBay which is why I’m asking here. Both play and sound phenomenal so I’m looking at it from an investment standpoint. Thoughts? Thank you.
NO
 

Big electric cat

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Murphy Lab. Just the name "Murphy Lab" makes me giggle.
It's just a marketing strategy. Keep what you have.
As long as the guitar has a long neck tenon you're golden. My Gibson Heritage 80 Les Paul
My Dad bought it for me in 1980 from Alex's on 48th st Manhattan. $1200 in 1980 dollars.
With a set of Bare Knuckle Mules. This guitar can purr like a kitten and scream like a bitch.
I must have put at least 10,000 hours on this guitar, never abused but constantly used.
Today it looks like a Super heavy relic guitar.
I played it so much I actually wore the wood on the back of the neck of by about an eighth of an inch.
I'd never get rid of this guitar for a "Murphy Lab" guitar.

Screenshot_20210620-203203.jpg


Screenshot_20210620-203131.jpg
 
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Cory

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Hi guys. Just curious about the pros and cons of the new Murphy’s. My r9 is not a verified Brazilian but it is a highly figured lemon burst. No real patina to brag about and no binding bleed. It is bone stock. The Murphy is a bourbon looking burst that is nearly unplayed. prices are all over the place on eBay which is why I’m asking here. Both play and sound phenomenal so I’m looking at it from an investment standpoint. Thoughts? Thank you.
Absolutely would not trade/sell to buy a Murphy lab - I personally feel that these will not be collector items/highly desirable in the future like a real Murphy painted/aged reissue - I could foresee these losing more value in the future versus even a standard reissue - it would be different if Tom himself was the one touching, painting, aging these guitars by hand like he used to - not saying they’re not good guitars (haven’t personally played/owned one), but I’m not convinced that they will stand the test of time from an investment standpoint (most modern guitars do not appreciate much in value anyways) - this is just an opinion - I’m no expert, so take it with a grain of salt
 
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mbm1972

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Murphy Lab. Just the name "Murphy Lab" makes me giggle.
It's just a marketing strategy. Keep what you have.
As long as the guitar has a long neck tenon you're golden. My Gibson Heritage 80 Les Paul
My Dad bought it for me in 1980 from Alex's on 48th st Manhattan. $1200 in 1980 dollars.
With a set of Bare Knuckle Mules. This guitar can purr like a kitten and scream like a bitch.
I must have put at least 10,000 hours on this guitar, never abused but constantly used.
Today it looks like a Super heavy relic guitar.
I played it so much I actually wore the wood on the back of the neck of by about an eighth of an inch.
I'd never get rid of this guitar for a "Murphy Lab" guitar.

View attachment 549536

View attachment 549537
I'm with Big Electric Cat on this one. I don't get the whole Murphy Lab thing other than as a marketing ploy. It's no different from pre-torn jeans (remember those?). Is that still a thing?

The question that keeps recurring in my mind every time I see a listing for one of the ML models, which are plentiful, is how will they hold up over time? If it starts out new with the ware of a 40 year old guitar, how will it hold up after actually being played/used for 40 years? Similarly to you, Big Electric Cat, I've been playing the hell out my '83 since I got it new in '89 - and for much of the intervening years it was my ONLY guitar - so loads of hours on it. It's held up beautifully (i've never been rough with it), but it does show the mileage at the same time.

And your's is a beauty, by the way - just gorgeous!

How the hell is a guitar with the full Murphy Lab treatment going to manage longevity like that I wonder? Honestly, and this is probably obvious to those in the know, but I don't know that much about the MLs, other than the obvious, so the preceding is not meant to be a rhetorical question.
 

Uncle Vinnie

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It's highly unlikely you'll ever get your money back on a Murphy lab, let alone make a profit.

Guitarists hear "Murphy lab" and pop a boner, but when they go to sell they'll find it difficult to find a buyer who's willing to shell out big bucks for a modded LP that looks like someone used it to play street hockey.

For a fraction of the money you can send your LP to HM, get a real Braz board and they do every bit as good a job as ML.

Either way, count on not getting your original investment back.
 

danzego

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If you’re doing this purely for investment purposes, you should talk to someone who knows something about investments. Mass produced guitars are not what you want to be putting your money into.
 

Big electric cat

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I'm with Big Electric Cat on this one. I don't get the whole Murphy Lab thing other than as a marketing ploy. It's no different from pre-torn jeans (remember those?). Is that still a thing?

The question that keeps recurring in my mind every time I see a listing for one of the ML models, which are plentiful, is how will they hold up over time? If it starts out new with the ware of a 40 year old guitar, how will it hold up after actually being played/used for 40 years? Similarly to you, Big Electric Cat, I've been playing the hell out my '83 since I got it new in '89 - and for much of the intervening years it was my ONLY guitar - so loads of hours on it. It's held up beautifully (i've never been rough with it), but it does show the mileage at the same time.

And your's is a beauty, by the way - just gorgeous!

How the hell is a guitar with the full Murphy Lab treatment going to manage longevity like that I wonder? Honestly, and this is probably obvious to those in the know, but I don't know that much about the MLs, other than the obvious, so the preceding is not meant to be a rhetorical question.
I appreciate your kind words concerning my guitar.
You know I gotta say this, IMO there is no one assembly line guitar being made
today that is going to return "investment grade" money. And if there is I don't know what guitar it would be. Have a great day!
 

AcVox

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My recollection of the R9s made between '99 - 01 was the pride Gibson took in acquiring the finest Mahogany and Maple for the guitars that would mark the millennium, and with it a high point in Gibson quality not seen for a generation.

It was the culmination of yrs of hard work by Edwin Wilson and his dedicated team of custom shop luthiers and artisans.

All this at a time when the demand for historic Les Paul's was still at a modest, manageable level, allowing both the time and the optimum materials to produce the finest instruments possible.

If I were fortunate enough to own a Les Paul from this period, I would seek the wisdom of Solomon before letting it go..
 

Jymbopalyse

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Hi guys. Just curious about the pros and cons of the new Murphy’s. My r9 is not a verified Brazilian but it is a highly figured lemon burst. No real patina to brag about and no binding bleed. It is bone stock. The Murphy is a bourbon looking burst that is nearly unplayed. prices are all over the place on eBay which is why I’m asking here. Both play and sound phenomenal so I’m looking at it from an investment standpoint. Thoughts? Thank you.
FIRST:

How well has Karma treated you ??


Now choose your answer.
 

guitardon

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Thank you all for the responses. Yes I was speaking about investment purposes only. My number one is a heavily flamed sweet cherry 97 R8 and the 01 R9 is my number two. I have about 40 others in the stash, but I don’t have a murphy at all. The offer is for a straight up trade which is why I was entertaining this conundrum :) I love my R9 and have had it since 2008, but I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to “trade up” if I would, in fact, be doing so. Considering the feedback here, it sounds like I’d be trading down though. I’ve played the Murphy as well and it does have the mojo. I’ve had many reissues that didn’t have it……they were basically paper weights. I even bought a yamano new and found it to be dead as a door nail. This Murphy resonates close to my 01. I figured it would only get better. I suppose at this point, I should just sell a couple of others and buy the murphy rather than trade. I can buy it for $7500 which is the “friend” price. Looks like I have a different decision to make at this point.

Thank you all for the constructive feedback. I’ll post a few pics shortly.
Keep what you have, you have a large enough stash to sell some off and not miss them. Then buy a ML if that’s your passion. Personally I’d never buy one though. Nothing like real aging by playing it a few years.
 

ArchEtech

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It’s possible, assuming all the finish doesn’t flake off, that the ML might be worth a bit more than your current R9 in a few years. It’s not like it’s going to double in value though or gain value at a rate 2x what your current R9 will. So when you say investment, what is your goal?

In 5 years both guitars might be worth a little more than they are now. The ML might be with slightly more than typical R9. Because of inflation all the other guitars you might want to trade up on, or flip the ML to get will also be a bit more money. Was the ML really an investment?

It’s not like you’re ever going to pocket $5000 on a ML as an investment. Maybe I’m wrong but I highly doubt it.
 


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