Should I just say @#*& it and sand the bloody neck down??

capnjim

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Howdy all, so I have wanted a single P-90 Junior for as long as I can remember.
I got a '63 SG Les Paul Junior, it was a one owner guitar.
I paid way too much, 3800$cdn. They are very scarce in Canada and I can't buy from the US what with the lousy exchange.
I had the guitar a year, then sold it. Lo and behold, the seller sends me this nightmare pic.
The neck had come loose, not broken, but someone used 6 screws and glue to "repair" it.
I naturally gave the guy a refund.
I had an excellent luthier look at it and he said to leave it as its 100% solid and might cause more damage than its worth to try to repair it.
"Screws are good enough for Fender" he said.

I never thought to take off the pickguard as it was a very clean one owner guitar.
Now I am stuck with it. I'm not going to sell it for way less than I paid and lose 1000$.
But....the neck is huge. I thought I could get used to it, but it massive.
I am thinking about just sanding it down.
I think it has lost its collector value, and I will at least be able to play it.
Whaddya think? Is it a huge deal to sand down a neck? I would need to romove quite a bit of wood.
Cheers

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Dolebludger

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What is that mess where the neck pup would be, if it had one?
 

Jewel the Sapphire

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Hell yeah! Say, if you dont want to take a loss selling it with the neck joint photo getting lowball offers just make it yours! The screws were predrilled and it looks like it isnt going anywhere so..

Worth shaping and refinishing the neck since you always wanted the guitar!

Thank you for the photo I will remember it to always check the neck joint out on juniors!
 
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stp

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be carefull not to sand into the trust rod. but you can do it.
 
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treatb

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what the hell? don't sand the insert if you are going to fix it. you'll only ruin the fit. hide glue can be removed with hot water. sanding is one of the worst things you can do. it looks like it is still a pretty good fit. the right side of the neck might need a shim. most likely the neck just popped, which can happen with those sg joints, and someone just bolted it back together. if those screw holes can be used, plug them after you do a basic gluing after the fit check, and you'll have extra insurance using plugs like the screws. if the neck isn't fit well, just take some mahogany shims and glue them to the outside and work it down till it fits, DON'T REMOVE ORIGINAL WOOD EVER... you can even measure the threading and thread the dowels/plugs. this will increase surface area, but if you are working with hide glue, it'll be difficult to plug them before the glue sets.

another thing, make sure you take measurements to keep scale length. idk what you mean about sanding the neck down, but if it plays right the way it is, those screw holes will really help you keep the scale length in proper position.

it is a lot of work to fit a neck. alignments are a pain.

i'm a luthier. graduated 1st in my class at roberto-venn, but i'm just a hobbyist now.
 
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Jewel the Sapphire

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what the hell? don't sand the insert if you are going to fix it. you'll only ruin the fit. hide glue can be removed with hot water. sanding is one of the worst things you can do. it looks like it is still a pretty good fit. the right side of the neck might need a shim. most likely the neck just popped, which can happen with those sg joints, and someone just bolted it back together. if those screw holes can be used, plug them after you do a basic gluing after the fit check, and you'll have extra insurance using plugs like the screws. if the neck isn't fit well, just take some mahogany shims and glue them to the outside and work it down till it fits, DON'T REMOVE ORIGINAL WOOD EVER... you can even measure the threading and thread the dowels/plugs. this will increase surface area, but if you are working with hide glue, it'll be difficult to plug them before the glue sets.

another thing, make sure you take measurements to keep scale length. idk what you mean
He is talking about sanding the neck carve so its not so thick, not the neck joint

Fixing the 1963 SG junior neck joint in depth like that would restore some value, maybe taking off just enough for a veneer to go over it all afterwards and applying a matched finish can save value

If the owner doesnt want to leave the neck thickness as is I would have one luthier do both the jobs and match the finish to get the value back up and then make up their mind if its priceless or for sale

Sanding down necks is not good for value at all, but I almost did it to a fatty fat Epiphone 1955 Custom
 

Zentar

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If I had to send it back to Gibson and pay them $2k to fix it I would do it. No one has the right to drill holes in a vintage SG. It is a work of art just like a Monet and should be treated as such. I am disgusted that anyone would damage a beautiful historical guitar in that way. You need to make a fone call to the guy that ripped up that guitar and carefully explain what these old guitars we play really are. What he did was desecration. Did that guy live in Virginia?
 

Dolebludger

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Looks like the former owner lived in West Virginia! Seriously, it is difficult to find an early 60s SG that hasn't had neck repair. The neck joints are a very weak part of these guitars. But screws are not the way to do the repair, and it is a shame that the OP wasn't told about this improper repair before he bought it at the price paid.
 

capnjim

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Well some of you guys aren't really understanding what I am getting at. there are no repairs needed. Its ugly, but its 100% solid.
Repeat: Mo repairs needed. Neck angle is perfect, action is low and lots more room. Guitar plays really well.. To try to "repair" what is there is just silly. Fender has been using screws on their necks for almost 70 years.
I am just talking about thinning the neck down, leaving it in place.
Its super chunky. Has anyone done this? I used to re-finish furniture, and I bet with a touch of paint stripper, I could remove the original finish and save it and re-use it.
 

refret

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The fuller neck profile of this era is great and more desirable than the shallow 1961 style neck carve.

Sell it to someone who wants this neck profile and get yourself an earlier one. They are out there.
 

capnjim

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I have had it for sale for almost a year at 3k cdn and zero interest. I guess I could try to list it on reverb. Maybe in the spring.
 

RevWillie

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If you think that neck is huge, you must like pretty thin necks.

Be careful, it's 50:50 that you sand right into the truss rod channel and ruin the whole neck. Then you have a $2k repair on top of everything else you have in the guitar.

:cheers:
 

tigger

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I would not sand it down if it plays well. There's a good chance you'll need a fret level after since the neck wood might bow unevenly, and you might end up losing some of the resonance that you perhaps like it for and end up with a guitar that's even more ruined and you still don't like it...
 

Roxy13

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I understand on what you're getting at about changing the neck profile to suit you better. I guess I just can't help thinking if someone could do a really nice repair on it that maybe you could recoup most of what you spent and it would get to stay as it is. I realize though you are paying for the repair as well so probably not. It just bothers me I guess to see that someone did that to a vintage SG.

And as others pointed out, you could run into the truss rod doing it yourself. So even that might be best done by a pro who has done this before on vintage guitars.

I'm sorry someone didn't reveal this to you before you bought it.
 

capnjim

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Thanks guys, I would probably be too scared to actually try. Seems like it might not be a good idea.
I was just curious if anyone had re-profiled a neck before.
I bought it from an old guy who was selling it for his sick brother who bought it new. I don't think they knew about the repair.
My luthier, who is the best in Montreal BTW...said it was probably done a long time ago. Its common in Canada with our dry cold winters for necks on certain older modles to become loose.
It was not an expensive guitar, so it was an easy fast fix. Glue it and screw it.
Its ugly, but as I said, the neck angle is perfect and it's very solid, and without taking off the pick guard, you would never know its even there.. It would be stupid to try to "repair" it, as there is nothing really to repair.
 

Herbie74

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I just had a 1966 Pelham blue melody maker renecked. Could not live with neck (needed a reset and wierd profile) and wanted an original factory finished Pelham blue Sg. Lay’s guitar in Akron Ohio did the work and they also shaved the neck on Jimmy Page’s number one back in the day. Not sure how close they are to you to them, just fyi
 

Dolebludger

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I’d like to see a pic of the back of the neck heel joint. If it isn’t ragged, it would be a quick and inexpensive job for a luthier to remove the neck, align it (the thing I wouldn’t trust myself to do), glue it, re-secure it with the screws, fill the holes and stain them, and put the guard back on. Then there would be two choices. First, sell it and be up front about the heel joint repair, which most early 60s SGs have had anyway. Second, you could have the neck carve changed, but I’m sure this would be costly.

Oh yeah, there is a third choice too. Have the neck reset (it ain’t going to last the way it is) and play it. I purposely get guitars with differing neck carves. I prefer super thin (small fingers and hands), but I learn things by playing on thicker necks. Maybe you could too.
 




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