Semi Hollow Models Comparable to ES-335

rednefceleb

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You are right. My phrase should have read either P-90's or single coils. Single p-90's is redundant and makes no sense. If they play as well as the 60's Tribute Plus L.P. that would be great. If I swing one more Epi, I would buy the Tak Matsumoto model.:thumb:
 

Dolebludger

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I have a different suggestion for a “335 type” guitar. I have a Carvin SH 225 semi hollow double cut (mint 1982) that is like a 335 on steroids! It is all maple with two splittable humbuckers and phase switch. It also has a fine tuning bridge. This model guitar is no longer sold new. But mine was a bit over $800 new with HSC. I see on internet sites that this model sells for about that mint used. It will handle everything from jazz to metal.it has a very comfortable neck with ebony fretboard. I had played some Gibson ES 335s before I ordered this Carvin. When I got the Carvin, the 335s felt to me like base Chevys of the day, and the Carvin played like a Ferrari!.

This Carvin SH 225 may take a bit of work to find. But if you like the kind of guitars I like, you will find the search to be well worth the effort.
 

BadPenguin

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Inexpensive? I suggest a used Epiphone Sheraton II. A good one from the mid 80's is a KILLER guitar that will stand toe to toe with a Gibby any day of the week.
Something in the mid price range? Hunt down a 77 Aria Pro II ES700. STUNNING player, with A2 hums that just ooze warmth and tone.
Every Eastman I have played, I have wanted.
Heritage. Seriously, the name says it all!
Looking for something rare? hunt down an original Ibanez Artist AS200. Or even an older Scofield. you won't regret it.
 

Dolebludger

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Bad,

I don’t know what you consider inexpensive, but if somebody were to buy my Carvin SH 225 for $800, i’d think they got the deal of the century — but it certainly is not for sale!

Now, I like Ibanez also. I’ve an Ibanez full hollow that is a great jazz box. I got it used mint for $260. The only problem I have with it is that it is purely a jazz box. The humbuckers aren’t strong enough for other genres. But if the Ibanez semi hollows have stronger pups, they would be a great deal used — and even new! I like my Ibby as it has that brand’s well known slim necks. Very playable, at least for me.
 

Roxy13

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I have even had luthiers tell me that all the Ibanez semi and full hollow are excellent for the money, including the cheap ones. I have to say they intrigue me. They can be really blingy and yet pull it off in a classy way.

I took a few pics of my Greco SA-900 today after playing it. I am in love with this guitar, and so glad this is the one I chose. Click on the pics to enlarge them.

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Dolebludger

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Really classy looking guitar, Roxy. I am not familiar with Greco guitars, as I live in a very remote part of the US, and music stores are scarce. But I am personally familiar with Ibanez, and they are great guitars — especially for the price. As I said, I bought my Ibby full hollow for playing jazz, and it is perfect for that. And if Ibby puts hotter pups in their semi hollows, they would be great for other music too. As a guy with small hands and fingers, I really love the Ibby necks. They are very slim, which is good for me. For a guy like Hendrix (huge hands and fingers) Ibby necks might not be best for him. But I ain’t him! The workmanship on my Ibby is beyond reproach.

I posted about my vintage Carvin SH 225 only because of its versatility. It will do for soft jazz and for screaming metal. Of course, my Ibby jazz box won’t go there.

One of the things we don’t know (or I haven’t seen) is what genre of music the OP wants to play on his/her semi - hollow. If he/she wants to go with an Ibby, i’d suggest a test play to see if it will do all he/she wants. If that works out, there is no better buy than an Ibby — used or new.
 

paruwi

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inexpensive? I suggest a used Epiphone Sheraton II. A good one from the mid 80's is a KILLER guitar that will stand toe to toe with a Gibby any day of the week.
of course, that would be a MiJ Epi..... :naughty:

though not really 'inexpensive' over here
 

Roxy13

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Really classy looking guitar, Roxy. I am not familiar with Greco guitars, as I live in a very remote part of the US, and music stores are scarce. But I am personally familiar with Ibanez, and they are great guitars — especially for the price. As I said, I bought my Ibby full hollow for playing jazz, and it is perfect for that. And if Ibby puts hotter pups in their semi hollows, they would be great for other music too. As a guy with small hands and fingers, I really love the Ibby necks. They are very slim, which is good for me. For a guy like Hendrix (huge hands and fingers) Ibby necks might not be best for him. But I ain’t him! The workmanship on my Ibby is beyond reproach.

I posted about my vintage Carvin SH 225 only because of its versatility. It will do for soft jazz and for screaming metal. Of course, my Ibby jazz box won’t go there.

One of the things we don’t know (or I haven’t seen) is what genre of music the OP wants to play on his/her semi - hollow. If he/she wants to go with an Ibby, i’d suggest a test play to see if it will do all he/she wants. If that works out, there is no better buy than an Ibby — used or new.
It is probably unlikely you would find one of those here in a music store. These were all custom order in the mid-late 70s from Greco. They basically had a custom shop before Gibson did and called it The Project Series.

Here is some good info on them that was written by member JDZ:

 

hbucker

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Played an Eastman T59 last weekend and was extremely impressed!
 

rednefceleb

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I have a different suggestion for a “335 type” guitar. I have a Carvin SH 225 semi hollow double cut (mint 1982) that is like a 335 on steroids! It is all maple with two splittable humbuckers and phase switch. It also has a fine tuning bridge. This model guitar is no longer sold new. But mine was a bit over $800 new with HSC. I see on internet sites that this model sells for about that mint used. It will handle everything from jazz to metal.it has a very comfortable neck with ebony fretboard. I had played some Gibson ES 335s before I ordered this Carvin. When I got the Carvin, the 335s felt to me like base Chevys of the day, and the Carvin played like a Ferrari!.

This Carvin SH 225 may take a bit of work to find. But if you like the kind of guitars I like, you will find the search to be well worth the effort.
Chiming in for the love of Carvin. I had a couple of their amps before the amp production stopped. A 2x12 50w Bel Air. And their 100/watt head. VERY versatile amp.It took EL-34's-6-L6's-6-V6's. 2 tubes or 4. Etc. Great amp.Their guitars are quality. M-22 pups. I'm gonna google that SH-225 to get the idea...Carvin did not cross my mind.:thumb:
 

BadPenguin

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Bad,

I don’t know what you consider inexpensive, …….
My Epiphone was 250 USD with case. I think in most guitar players vocabulary, that would fall under "inexpensive".

I've had a few Carvins in my life. A something something 130 or so comes to mind. A FANTASTIC Paul like creature, that the only drawback was that it was made of birdseye maple, and was so bright, it was a pain in the asterisk to EQ. The other was a Holdsworth H2, that like an idiot, sold it during a period of "flat wallet syndrome". I still regret that to this day.
The ONLY issue with Carvins, is that since they were, at that time a "custom" shop, is what the original buyer wanted, you have to want as well in the used market. Sometimes custom for one, is annoying to another.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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Epiphone Elitist Casino Single P-90's though.
OP said semi-hollow; the Casino (which, along its identical twin the 330, is my favorite electric model of all times) does not suit his needs,as it is fully hollow. Different beast.
 

hbucker

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Thx everyone for the great suggestions. Virtually everyone understood where I was coming from - Alas, there isn't enough room or $$ for me to take you all up on your suggestions.

I ended up pulling the trigger on an Eastman T486, to be delivered on Tuesday. I was super impressed with the T59 that I played last week. Basically the same guitar as the T486 with different pickups and finish, which I didn't care for on the T59.

Have a buddy with an Eastman acoustic, (I didn't realize this until yesterday) which he loves. Hard to find anyone with experience who has anything but positives about Eastman. Will check back once it arrives.

Thanks again!

Photo of the guitar to be delivered:

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HCRoadie

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I predict that you will be very happy with it. Enjoy and lets us know
 

moreles

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I second FGN, Yamaha, and Eastwood (not Eastman). Though they aren't cut-rate price-wise, the value for money and absolute quality can be huge. I would avoid Epi; the "Casino" I had seemed to have been dipped in liquid plastic for a finish and had pickups that sounded like they were mailing it in from the next state over.I was pretty but didn't even seem to be a guitar.
 

Dolebludger

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I second FGN, Yamaha, and Eastwood (not Eastman). Though they aren't cut-rate price-wise, the value for money and absolute quality can be huge. I would avoid Epi; the "Casino" I had seemed to have been dipped in liquid plastic for a finish and had pickups that sounded like they were mailing it in from the next state over.I was pretty but didn't even seem to be a guitar.
When I was looking for a full hollow jazz box, I found an Epi ES 175 at one of the few area music stores here. I was shopping for used as a jazz box wouldn’t be my main guitar. Never plugged it in as I saw this”crack” in the neck extending down from the nut at a back angle toward the bottom of the neck. A harmless finish crack? Or maybe a crack in the wood? I don’t know, but I sure didn’t want to buy any problem! And I’ve never seen a crack like that on anything but an Epi.

To be fair, no such problems on my Epi LP. And no “dipped in plastic” problems with it either. But with Epi (as with all guitars) play (and examine) before you pay without a no-questions -asked return policy.
 

hbucker

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My Eastman T486 arrived. Photos below. A very nice guitar. Resonant, expressive, really nice tone. Surprisingly versatile. I like the smaller headstocks they are putting on the new models. I like it a lot better than the more flared version they originally went with. It's new, but so far no regrets.

And it's actually more "flamey" than the photos reveal. Really beautiful!

Thanks again for everyone's help.

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