School me on "metal guitars"

grumphh

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I just want a guitar that can stay tight with high gain, has vibrato, and is set up for metal playing instead of blues (longer scale length, flatter radius, etc).
I am allowed to be slightly sarcastic, as my main point still stands.

Any solidbody guitar (preferrably with a bridge humbucker) can be used for metal. Period.

The idea that "you need a certain kind of guitar in order to play a certain genre" is just not a very well thought out idea.

Just get a guitar you fancy, and play whatever music you like on it. It really isn't harder than that.
 

OldBenKenobi

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What's the white guitar, a Charvel San Dimas? What should I know about Charvel? I see them priced all over the map, not sure what the higher quality examples are.

I LOVE the look that Mockingbird, wow! I'll definitely look into those, but I'm not sure where to find one locally.
Yes, it is a Charvel San Dimas.

With modern Charvels there are two major models, the San Dimas and the So-Cal, which make up the Pro-Mod line. There's also the San Dimas Style 2, which has a Tele shape, but it's less common and more of an afterthought IMO. The San Dimas is rear routed while the So-Cal is top routed. They also come with different pickups and hardware colors. Besides that, they're identical. 12"-16" fretboard radius, 6100 frets, Floyd Rose 1000 trem, etc.

Initially released in 2008, they were made in the USA and every three months they would roll out a new batch with different finishes and hardware. After the 8th batch production moved to Japan, which brought a couple changes: The hardware on the San Dimas switched from black to chrome, the pickup rings were dropped for direct mounts and the neck got a yellowish tint for a quasi-aged look. Production in Japan lasted about a year, until 2011. After that the Pro-Mods went on hiatus.

In 2013 production resumed in Mexico. The Mexico models had a few differences from the Japanese ones. The biggest change was the Floyd Rose was recessed. In 2016 the entire line was overhauled. The one-piece quartersawn maple neck was replaced with a two-piece flatsawn neck with graphite reinforcement rods and a spoke wheel russ rod adjust at the heel. The controls were expanded, adding a tone knob and a five way position switch with coil splitting. Since then they've strayed more from the original formula, adding Dinkies and playing around with the aesthetics.

For my money, the USA and Japanese made models were the coolest but the current ones are more versatile and "metal."

Around the time of the MIM shakeup Charvel launched a new line of USA-made guitars, USA select. They're HSS guitars with Original Floyd Roses, Dimarzio pickups, bullet truss rods and satin finishes. The price is much steeper than that of the Pro-Mods but they skew a little more traditional.

The pinnacle of Charvel is the Custom Shop. It's led by the same guys who worked there in the late 70s. Prices are high and wait times are massive (last I heard they aren't even taking orders outside of The Music Zoo because their backlog is huge) but the guitars have a great reputation.
 

Freddy G

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I am allowed to be slightly sarcastic, as my main point still stands.

Any solidbody guitar (preferrably with a bridge humbucker) can be used for metal. Period.

The idea that "you need a certain kind of guitar in order to play a certain genre" is just not a very well thought out idea.

Just get a guitar you fancy, and play whatever music you like on it. It really isn't harder than that.
Well there are some basic points....hot bucker etc. You prolly wouldn't want use an L5 for example.
Nevermind....just noticed you said any solid body....
 

CB91710

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Have you checked out the Dustie Waring CE 24 Floyd?

I don't know what it is.
Necks and colors.
I love maple necks on Strats and Teles.
I love a nice transparent green or blue on a quilted maple top on a Strat, Tele, or PRS.
Maple just does not look right on a Les Paul, SG, or PRS.
I can't stand blues and greens on Les Pauls.
 

CB91710

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What brands have longer scale length than, say, Fender's 25.5"? PRS are 25.4" I believe. I probably won't downtune to anything too extreme, but yeah that's a good point.
Fender (other than the short scales) is 25.5"
PRS is 25"
Gibson is 24.75"
Brian May Guild is 24"
Most generic models use the Fender scale. Harley Benton is an oddball, using the PRS scale for most of their models.

Capo a Strat at the 1st fret and you have a 24" scale... so a Strat tuned down 1/2 step would be comparable to a Brian May at standard tuning.
Personally, I run 9's on my Fenders and 10's on my Gibsons... 10's are a bit floppy feeling dropped to DADGAD, but they do work without buzz.

If you're going to be tuning to Drop-D, or even tuning down a full step, you're going to be OK with pretty much any scale, but may want to step up the string gauge.
You can get 28-5/8" Baritone scale conversion necks from Warmoth.
 

grumphh

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Well there are some basic points....hot bucker etc.
Actually there are no basic requirements for a (solidbody) guitar to be used for metal. Or any other genre.

The genre is in what the player decides to play, not in the guitar - which is only the physical means to translate the players musical intention into voltages that can be amplified.
If you as a player can play a given genre, then you can play it on any (solidbody) guitar.


To not be to onesided about this, of course there are specs* that make shaping the required tone slightly easier.
... but in the end, if all you have is a no-name beginners strat copy (and two Metal-zone pedals), you can still play metal with it...


* Imo the only spec sort of required for "metal" is a bridge pickup and (as written before) preferrably a humbucker.

As for longer scale lengths being one of the required specs, not ime - within reason both 24.75 and 25½ have no problems whatsoever with one whole step down with 009's or 010's - and personally i even have one 25½ guitar that is tuned to "C Standard" (all strings four semitones down) with 010's. It works, only i had to get used to the rubbery feeling of the strings, and if i am not extremely careful chords go sour immediately... But it sounds nice through a crapload of distortion :D
 

northernguitarguy

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Actually there are no basic requirements for a (solidbody) guitar to be used for metal. Or any other genre.

The genre is in what the player decides to play, not in the guitar - which is only the physical means to translate the players musical intention into voltages that can be amplified.
If you as a player can play a given genre, then you can play it on any (solidbody) guitar.


To not be to onesided about this, of course there are specs* that make shaping the required tone slightly easier.
... but in the end, if all you have is a no-name beginners strat copy (and two Metal-zone pedals), you can still play metal with it...


* Imo the only spec sort of required for "metal" is a bridge pickup and (as written before) preferrably a humbucker.

As for longer scale lengths being one of the required specs, not ime - within reason both 24.75 and 25½ have no problems whatsoever with one whole step down with 009's or 010's - and personally i even have one 25½ guitar that is tuned to "C Standard" (all strings four semitones down) with 010's. It works, only i had to get used to the rubbery feeling of the strings, and if i am not extremely careful chords go sour immediately... But it sounds nice through a crapload of distortion :D
Laughing at attempt to explain guitars to @Freddy G .
 
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Deftone

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Did someone say METAL?!

My #1 is an '89 LPC Lite with a factory Floyd for metal. But they are rare and hard to find under $2k

IMG_2038a.JPG


Check out the Gibson Shred line, most are under $2K and have a Floyd....

https://reverb.com/marketplace?query=gibson shred

Also as mentioned, the Charvel Model series are excellent. I got mine for $200, but most can be had in the $400-$600 range.

54771-1359298534-6bc145e2fdcbc7641dcbc15e9a6f0fdf.jpg


For lower tuning I use a Digitech Drop pedal.
 

Deftone

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I'm very interested in the Solar guitars being offered by Ola...

Solar singlecut.
View attachment 423462

3 bridge types. Evertune, Floyd, and the classic bridge/stoptail. They also make V's and Superstrat shapes.
I've been eyeing the V1.6FRC – Carbon Black Matte. Really nice features and a Mahogany body/maple neck.


 

ErictheRed

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Guys, I get that you can use any type of guitar for any genre of music. This thread isn't for that particular pissing contest. I grew up playing a lot of heavier grunge like Alice in Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, etc. It's not quite "metal," but I'm not clueless about heavy music, just looking to take it one step further.

I was hoping to be educated on makes and models that are generally used for metal, and why some of the features are important. I already have a fantastic Strat and Tele, and a R9 that I think is the greatest guitar I've ever played. I have an old Hiwatt, Vibrolux, tons of pedals, and a Mesa Triple Crown (which would be the "metal amp" for me, though the Hiwatt with pedals can work). I'm looking for a guitar that has trem, plays fast, has good upper-fret access, and has high output humbuckers, Jesus. I don't need to be lectured like a twelve year old about how to whammy without a whammy bar and how this particular player gets an awesome metal tone with a Hello Kitty guitar, which is what some posts sound like (looking @grumphh mostly).

Thanks to those who have helped.

As an aside, I can't believe that I mixed up Martin's 25.4" scale length with PRS's 25", doh!
 
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Ghostman

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A Solar will be my next guitar purchase, absolutely.

But I will agree that any guitar can be a metal guitar, but for me, the shape and feel inspires certain genre's. I'd have a terrible time trying to get into a metal state of mind with an old ES335, or play blues on a Dean Mustaine V.
 

Gtarzan81

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Guys, I get that you can use any type of guitar for any genre of music. This thread isn't for that particular pissing contest. I grew up playing a lot of heavier grunge like Alice in Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, etc. It's not quite "metal," but I'm not clueless about heavy music, just looking to take it one step further.

I was hoping to be educated on makes and models that are generally used for metal, and why some of the features are important. I already have a fantastic Strat and Tele, and a R9 that I think is the greatest guitar I've ever played. I have an old Hiwatt, Vibrolux, tons of pedals, and a Mesa Triple Crown (which would be the "metal amp" for me, though the Hiwatt with pedals can work). I'm looking for a guitar that has trem, plays fast, and has high output humbuckers, Jesus. I don't need to be lectured like a twelve year old about how to whammy without a whammy bar and how this particular player gets an awesome metal tone with a Hello Kitty guitar, which is what some posts sound like (looking @grumphh mostly).

Thanks to those who have helped.

As an aside, I can't believe that I mixed up Martin's 25.4" scale length with PRS's 25", doh!
Do check out that EBMM Steve Morse Y2D I sent over. I've played two and own one. My buddy has one and I liked it enough to seek out one.
They have a hot ceramic bucker in the bridge that meets your needs.

I own 3 amazing guitars. The DGT, Y2D, and an Edwards LP Custom.
 

Deftone

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A Solar will be my next guitar purchase, absolutely.

But I will agree that any guitar can be a metal guitar, but for me, the shape and feel inspires certain genre's. I'd have a terrible time trying to get into a metal state of mind with an old ES335, or play blues on a Dean Mustaine V.
Agreed.

I didn't think there would be any other Solar fans on the LP forum....stoked!

Cool thread anyway!
 

Deftone

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is it me, or does it seem like Solar guitars are steamrolling right now?
Ola is popular on YT, so I'm sure that's helping. Not to mention they are good looking guitars with nice features. I really like the beveled edges on the V. Mahogany body/maple set neck is a winner, so are jumbo SS frets.

The Natural Aged Distressed Type A is looking pretty sick.....


 




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