Router bits; look at this bad dad..

pavel

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I use a Bosch 1617EVS (2 ¼ HP) in a router table with a 1 ¼" and 2" version of the Whiteside spiral bit (the RFT5125 and RFT5200 upcut version) to do necks and bodies, respectively, on all my F-style builds and on my recent burst build body route. Always get super smooth cuts with these. With their cutting power, they definitely command healthy amount of respect, for sure.
 

failsafe306

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Reminds me a bit of these that I've seen pop up on AliExpress. These have the replaceable and rotatable carbide inserts, remind me more of a Spindle Moulder cutter than a router bit, no idea how they perform .... View attachment 541650
That scares the S outta me. What if one of those came loose at 20k rpm?!
 

jav8599

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Imagine one of the replaceable carbide inserts on that import bit coming loose at 30,000rpm. Screws are bound to loosen with that much vibe and movement. As a carpenter, wood worker and player for over 40 years, I wouldn't touch that with a 100 ft pole.
 

Prostheta

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I find no advantages to that sort of cutter beyond it reducing tool pressure chatter. The cutting edges look somewhat delicate by comparison to full width cutters, and damage to one writes off the whole bit. The complex geometry and meat missing around the shaft would invite potential for heat and shmoo buildup. Consider avoiding.

My weapon of choice tends to be a 50mm long, 20mm diameter endmill with replaceable single knife and square tip carbides. For the table router a d19mm x 11mm downshear does most of what I need.

Recommendations about upshear, downshear and compression bits are very valid. Avoid anything with reasonable weight behind it from the usual scumbags. You've zero guarantee of alignment, balance or whether the carbides are brazed well. QC, "maybe". Possibly.

edit: I just realised that the big d20mm bit doesn't make much sense without context:
20210608_134615 - Copy.jpg
 
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zdoggie

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when you stick one of these babys into your favorite slab of mahagony you better be on your A game

zdog
 

Duane.S

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Look like a roughing mill.
That is what I thought. It may work well for deep cuts / removing a lot of material. I also wonder if because it has many small teeth it may also reduce tear out?
 

larryguitar

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Would that prevent tearout, or just cut faster than a typical bit?

I've blown up enough bodies and necks routing the edges I sand to final shape at this point, and it's a PITA.

Larry
 

CB91710

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Would that prevent tearout, or just cut faster than a typical bit?

I've blown up enough bodies and necks routing the edges I sand to final shape at this point, and it's a PITA.
Grain is grain and if you whack the end with too much cutter it's going to tear out.
Like I said, I see the advantage being that it has the chip clearing flutes of a spiral bit, but the cutting faces are perpendicular to the platen, so there is no downforce that could cause splintering on the lower surface (or upper surface in a hand-held router)
 


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