Rookie mistake

ScotttheScot

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I jumped at this neck blank a little too quick but I’m just going to have to live with it and make it work.
I’m realizing the blank is on the small side to a get a LP neck out of without adding wings witch I know is common practice.
My question is can you cut a neck blank out and create a level plane (finger board ) from rough band sawn blank.
My inclination is to lay the blank over on wider plane blank and add ears . Comments suggestions?
 

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ScotttheScot

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Uh…yeah

I’m not seeing any mistakes here. Am I missing something?
The tolerance’s would be tight and I’m not that great with hand planes yet. I could use my joiner with a gig of some sort to flatten the finger board area so I have a reference plane to cut the head stock angle properly.
My photos don’t illustrate my problem very well.
 

LtDave32

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I jumped at this neck blank a little too quick but I’m just going to have to live with it and make it work.
I’m realizing the blank is on the small side to a get a LP neck out of without adding wings witch I know is common practice.
My question is can you cut a neck blank out and create a level plane (finger board ) from rough band sawn blank.
My inclination is to lay the blank over on wider plane blank and add ears . Comments suggestions?



Are you saying you want to level the surface that the fret board sits on, from a rough band saw cut?

yes you can, but it is work with a hand plane. You can get a head start on it by jigging it up and running it through a table saw.

But in those photos, as Nuance97 said, I don't see a problem. You seem to be on the same thing I do, which is flush the pattern to the outside edge, mark off the headstock angle, cut that, then cut the neck out from the backside. You can then use the pattern to make a hard pattern to clean all that up on the router table.

The outer side of the neck billet should give you a pretty good fret board surface as-is. Some light work with a hand plane should work out any bugs.

If you have a joiner, you can run the surface that glues to the neck on that.

If you don't have that kind of joiner, then you can use a sanding block and 120 grit paper to true that surface up. But it should be pretty close as-is.
 

ScotttheScot

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Are you saying you want to level the surface that the fret board sits on, from a rough band saw cut?

yes you can, but it is work with a hand plane. You can get a head start on it by jigging it up and running it through a table saw.

But in those photos, as Nuance97 said, I don't see a problem. You seem to be on the same thing I do, which is flush the pattern to the outside edge, mark off the headstock angle, cut that, then cut the neck out from the backside. You can then use the pattern to make a hard pattern to clean all that up on the router table.

The outer side of the neck billet should give you a pretty good fret board surface as-is. Some light work with a hand plane should work out any bugs.

If you have a joiner, you can run the surface that glues to the neck on that.

If you don't have that kind of joiner, then you can use a sanding block and 120 grit paper to true that surface up. But it should be pretty close as-is.
I appreciate the input thanks. I can get this done I found it frustrating finding billits of mahogany of decent size and made the job twice as hard as it should be .
On positive side I found a gorgeous piece of tiger maple that I will be able to get two tops out of !! And the neck blank I will make work.
The mahogany body blank was advertised as two inches but it was was shy the good thing it’s super flat according to my I gang straight edge it’s straight across it’s length by 1/2 thou a couple times through the thickness sander and I should be good to
Thanks for your input
 

LtDave32

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I appreciate the input thanks. I can get this done I found it frustrating finding billits of mahogany of decent size and made the job twice as hard as it should be .
On positive side I found a gorgeous piece of tiger maple that I will be able to get two tops out of !! And the neck blank I will make work.
The mahogany body blank was advertised as two inches but it was was shy the good thing it’s super flat according to my I gang straight edge it’s straight across it’s length by 1/2 thou a couple times through the thickness sander and I should be good to
Thanks for your input

I do this for a living.

But I have to still source wood just like eva-buddy-else. It is a time-consuming chore, sourcing wood.

Once you find a reputable guy with consistent, good-weight billets, stick with him.

But shop around first. It will take you a whole day sometimes to find the right guy.

-That's building guitars, baby. haha..

On another note, you will be hard-pressed to find decent Honduran mahogany one-piece blanks that are of fair weight. Watch out for that. You need below 3 lbs per board foot. The common acceptable is 2.8 lbs bd/ft. If you find any that are lighter, buy them and hug them to your chest.

I've switched over to Spanish cedar for bodies because of the Honduran mahogany weight issue. I can't for the life of me find any that won't end up like a boat anchor. My customers like light gutiars. So I went with SC. it's light, nicely figured, beautiful pecan color, and it's resonant. In fact, if someone placed a HM body blank next to a SC blank and said "choose" I would choose the SC, every damn time. IMO, it's a better body wood for guitars, and it's in the mahogany family.

A lot of blanks are advertised as 8/4 or "eight quarters" lumber. This is common. They take a 2" slab and sand it on both sides. Whatever it takes to clean it up under the drum sander is what you get. Sometimes it's as thick as 1 15/16". Other times it's 1 3/4", if it took a lot to clean and true it up. That's the industry standard. If it falls below 1 3/4", it goes down to the next classification, 6/4 lumber.

Most slab guitars like Les Paul juniors, etc are 1 3/4" thick, taken from 8/4 lumber. So sometimes they run a bit thicker than 1 3/4" , that's just the nature of the game. But 1 3/4" is the minimum you need if you want an accurate jr or special.

If building a carve-top LP, you need it 1 3/4 thick on the mahogany, and 5/8 on the top. Some tops are thicker at 3/4".

If you have or have access to a thickness sander like a drum sander, you're well ahead of the game. Use that to clean up and size your wood correctly.
 

ScotttheScot

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I do this for a living.

But I have to still source wood just like eva-buddy-else. It is a time-consuming chore, sourcing wood.

Once you find a reputable guy with consistent, good-weight billets, stick with him.

But shop around first. It will take you a whole day sometimes to find the right guy.

-That's building guitars, baby. haha..

On another note, you will be hard-pressed to find decent Honduran mahogany one-piece blanks that are of fair weight. Watch out for that. You need below 3 lbs per board foot. The common acceptable is 2.8 lbs bd/ft. If you find any that are lighter, buy them and hug them to your chest.

I've switched over to Spanish cedar for bodies because of the Honduran mahogany weight issue. I can't for the life of me find any that won't end up like a boat anchor. My customers like light gutiars. So I went with SC. it's light, nicely figured, beautiful pecan color, and it's resonant. In fact, if someone placed a HM body blank next to a SC blank and said "choose" I would choose the SC, every damn time. IMO, it's a better body wood for guitars, and it's in the mahogany family.

A lot of blanks are advertised as 8/4 or "eight quarters" lumber. This is common. They take a 2" slab and sand it on both sides. Whatever it takes to clean it up under the drum sander is what you get. Sometimes it's as thick as 1 15/16". Other times it's 1 3/4", if it took a lot to clean and true it up. That's the industry standard. If it falls below 1 3/4", it goes down to the next classification, 6/4 lumber.

Most slab guitars like Les Paul juniors, etc are 1 3/4" thick, taken from 8/4 lumber. So sometimes they run a bit thicker than 1 3/4" , that's just the nature of the game. But 1 3/4" is the minimum you need if you want an accurate jr or special.

If building a carve-top LP, you need it 1 3/4 thick on the mahogany, and 5/8 on the top. Some tops are thicker at 3/4".

If you have or have access to a thickness sander like a drum sander, you're well ahead of the game. Use that to clean up and size your wood correctly.
Wise words and packed full of great info thanks for taking the time to pass your knowledge on .
I was a cabinet builder and installer so sourcing wood was never an issue because of using plywood and dimensions were smaller on door styles but making stuff in my own shop for me or my family it got harder finding good lumber because of the volume.
Thanks again
 

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