Rock and Roll

drugprowlingwolf

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Hey gang,

I’m new to recording but have just picked it up to record some of my own original material.

I have a a digital set up - Ezdrummer and some decent plug ins like s gear.

So, at this point I’m looking for some references and material. Most of the resources I’ve turned up are related to modern chugging rock. Not my cup of tea - I’m looking for more AC/DC or Black Crowes. I fully understand we’re in a technologically advanced time and I’m not going to get tape sounds out of my focusrite lol. That said, are there any good references or resources out there?

I really like the sounds in Back in Black, Southern Harmony, Sticky Fingers, etc. Driving guitar oriented rock.

Any help much appreciated regardless of subject I.e. drum sounds, mixing guitars, etc
 

Zacknorton

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??? Resources for how to achieve those kinds of sounds?

Small amps cranked, space between the mic and the amp. A good band tracked live.

Most of the info in doc’s and books is oblique as far as specific mics etc. but the book by Ken callait “Making rumors “. About making that Fleetwood Mac album is pretty detail heavy on how he did things.

“Are we still rolling” Phil Brown? Also a good read.

Ken Scott’s book is almost as wonderful as he is.

He and Eddie Kramer have given quite a few interviews.... then there’s the “making the record” type of documentaries that usually have a few informative bits.
 

Zacknorton

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The Tom petty doc “running down a Dream” is worth watching over and over. Not a lot of recording specifics in there. But wisdom falls off Tom’s jacket like dust.

Geoff emerick’s books is decent too.

Find interviews with the engineers etc of your favorite records? They’ve got to be online somewhere.
 

drugprowlingwolf

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Well....you just got yourself into a journey that never ends!

But one thing I would suggest is to download and study *.mogg files of your favorite artists. When you here tracks isolated, it's highly educational
Thanks Freddy. I’ll look into that. Right now I’m starting with what frequencies “belong” to which instruments and all the bare bones stuff. I imagine this will be a huge help.

The Tom petty doc “running down a Dream” is worth watching over and over. Not a lot of recording specifics in there. But wisdom falls off Tom’s jacket like dust.

Geoff emerick’s books is decent too.

Find interviews with the engineers etc of your favorite records? They’ve got to be online somewhere.

??? Resources for how to achieve those kinds of sounds?

Small amps cranked, space between the mic and the amp. A good band tracked live.

Most of the info in doc’s and books is oblique as far as specific mics etc. but the book by Ken callait “Making rumors “. About making that Fleetwood Mac album is pretty detail heavy on how he did things.

“Are we still rolling” Phil Brown? Also a good read.

Ken Scott’s book is almost as wonderful as he is.

He and Eddie Kramer have given quite a few interviews.... then there’s the “making the record” type of documentaries that usually have a few informative bits.
Thanks Zack. I’m limited to an apartment set up right now so amps being cranked is out of the question. I was referring to the sound of overall tracks - getting a good guitar tone in this context is something I’m familiar with.
I hadn’t considered hunting down interviews - good suggestion, sir. Much appreciated.
 

Zacknorton

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Follow that same concept into the amp sim/space world. Tape and vintage gear emulation is totally useful.

Mix tutorials on that kind of vibe
Should be out there. But I hear you. Most of it means modern heavy.
 

Big Bombo Mamma

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Well....you just got yourself into a journey that never ends!

But one thing I would suggest is to download and study *.mogg files of your favorite artists. When you hear tracks isolated, it's highly educational
Hello Everybody! Greetings from Argentina. Beeing from a nearly third world country, where every last piece of musical resource is extremely valious, this just blowed my mind. Thanks!

ps: sorry for my rusty english.
 

Static

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Just remember it is a journey and the best part is the process. There will be moments when the smallest thing will be inspiring and you'll be jazzed for days. Then other moments when you're bogged down, no solution in sight. That's the journey. But you'll be amazed at your progress if you keep at it.

The difference in quality of the sound from when I started in the early 2000's to today is remarkable. Yeah, sure, some of the equipment is better, but the main difference is experience.
 

Rocco Crocco

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Vintage style plugins can help with getting an analog sound. Virtual Tape machines, 1176 style compressors and Pultec EQ's, etc. I didn't know what any of that stuff was 6 months ago.

I have a Slate Digital All-Access monthly membership that gives me access to all their plug-ins. They have very good analog emulations.

It's a big rabbit hole and time investment if you want to get serious.
 


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