Rivolta Guitars?

EnjoGuitar

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Earlier this year, I purchased a Rivolta guitar after trying one out in person. I ended up with the Rivolta Combinata in Laguna Blue finish (in my profile picture). I wanna know if any of you have tried them, own them, etc. I understand Novo (sp?) Guitars are their parent company, but it seems that Rivolta make their own models and don’t mimic the Novos in the way Epiphone or Squier mimic Gibson and Fender respectively. I bought mine because it felt great to play, but I’m not terribly knowledgeable on them. Thoughts?
 

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endial

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Well, they sure look cool. Sound good too, from what I can tell from R.J. Ronquillo's many demos. Curious where you actually got to try one. Couldn't find one out this way with a divining rod and a compass.

Congratulations, and post some pics of her so we can help celebrate!
 
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Davey Rock

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Earlier this year, I purchased a Rivolta guitar after trying one out in person. I ended up with the Rivolta Combinata in Laguna Blue finish (in my profile picture). I wanna know if any of you have tried them, own them, etc. I understand Novo (sp?) Guitars are their parent company, but it seems that Rivolta make their own models and don’t mimic the Novos in the way Epiphone or Squier mimic Gibson and Fender respectively. I bought mine because it felt great to play, but I’m not terribly knowledgeable on them. Thoughts?
Dude I’ve got no idea. At least they do their own thing like you said. Like steinberger to Gibson or fender to gretsch.
 
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Earlier this year, I purchased a Rivolta guitar after trying one out in person. I ended up with the Rivolta Combinata in Laguna Blue finish (in my profile picture). I wanna know if any of you have tried them, own them, etc. I understand Novo (sp?) Guitars are their parent company, but it seems that Rivolta make their own models and don’t mimic the Novos in the way Epiphone or Squier mimic Gibson and Fender respectively. I bought mine because it felt great to play, but I’m not terribly knowledgeable on them. Thoughts?
They are excellent guitars!
I had the first year release of the Combinata (2012-ish) and altohugh they are FANTASTIC sounding guitars (very Rickenbacker) the radius (for me) was too flat. It was speced with a 12" but felt more like a 14". Also fret board edges were a tad too sharp. That was the only reason I let it go. Man, I still think about that guitar.
Congrats on the pick up!
 

mdubya

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They are designed by Dennis Fano, whose current company is Novo. Novo features Rivolta in their Nashville showroom.



I have had a Mondata in my shopping cart on more than one occasion. I have never managed to pull the trigger. I have mostly moved on, but would really like to try one someday.

If owning one would make me play like RJ, though?...

 
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redking

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Rivolta is a partnership between Eastwood guitars (Canadian company that revived the Airline brand when Jack White made the old ones cool) and Denis Fano who is the founder / owner of Novo guitars. I believe Denis designed them and Mike from Eastwood oversees the manufacturing as they are built in the same Korean factory used by Eastwood to build some of their models. (As I understand it, Duesenberg and Reverend guitars are also made in the same factory). You can buy Rivolta guitars from either Eastwood or Novo. (Eastwood also makes some of their lower cost guitars in China, so the higher priced ones on their site are made in Korea and the lower priced ones are made in China)

 

redking

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Rivolta is a partnership between Eastwood guitars (Canadian company that revived the Airline brand when Jack White made the old ones cool) and Denis Fano who is the founder / owner of Novo guitars. I believe Denis designed them and Mike from Eastwood oversees the manufacturing as they are built in the same Korean factory used by Eastwood to build some of their models. (As I understand it, Duesenberg and Reverend guitars are also made in the same factory). You can buy Rivolta guitars from either Eastwood or Novo. (Eastwood also makes some of their lower cost guitars in China, so the higher priced ones on their site are made in Korea and the lower priced ones are made in China)

What's funny is that it looks like Eastwood has more models available on their website than Novo. Check out the cool 12 string!
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redking

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They are excellent guitars!
I had the first year release of the Combinata (2012-ish) and altohugh they are FANTASTIC sounding guitars (very Rickenbacker) the radius (for me) was too flat. It was speced with a 12" but felt more like a 14". Also fret board edges were a tad too sharp. That was the only reason I let it go. Man, I still think about that guitar.
Congrats on the pick up!
I've owned 2 Airline guitars, one of which was made in the same plant and I found the fit and finish to be lacking. I had the same experience - If I wanted to keep the one I had (Airline Tuxedo), I would have had to invest a couple hundred dollars on a fret job and some work on the electronics because both were sub par on mine.
 

redking

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I have a suspicion if you buy a Rivolta from Novo, they will have done some QC work in Nashville before sending it out (because Denis is very fussy about stuff like that), so they would fix all the little manufacturing flaws that inevitably come out of the Korean plant, but if you buy it from Eastwood, there is a good chance it will come with some finish flaws that you will have to fix yourself. I'm pretty sure Eastwood is a one man operation and he just moves product, but doesn't have anyone doing QC on the product when it gets to North America. This is the reason I have been quite unhappy with the 2 Eastwoods that I have bought, because the Korean ones aren't cheap.
 
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I have a suspicion if you buy a Rivolta from Novo, they will have done some QC work in Nashville before sending it out (because Denis is very fussy about stuff like that), so they would fix all the little manufacturing flaws that inevitably come out of the Korean plant, but if you buy it from Eastwood, there is a good chance it will come with some finish flaws that you will have to fix yourself. I'm pretty sure Eastwood is a one man operation and he just moves product, but doesn't have anyone doing QC on the product when it gets to North America. This is the reason I have been quite unhappy with the 2 Eastwoods that I have bought, because the Korean ones aren't cheap.
Sorry to hear that about your Airliners. The fit and finish on my old Combi was flawless. I mean flawless. The deal with the Eastwood / Rivolta partnership is once they are produced overseas, they are all sent to the US location for final inspection. As for the other nameplates, I'm not sure how Eastwood produce, so I hate to speculate online without knowing.
 

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FWIW - I bought an MIK Tokai recently and it is close to flawless, too, like - I almost cant believe how good it is for the price. :shock:

I also have an MIK Epi Sheraton. Aside from the rat's nest electronics, it is a stellar guitar.

If the MIK Rivoltas are on par with my MIK experiences, they should be very, very good guitars.
 

EnjoGuitar

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Well, they sure look cool. Sound good too, from what I can tell from J. Ronquillo's many demos. Curious where you actually got to try one. Couldn't find one out this way with a divining rod and a compass.

Congratulations, and post some pics of her so we can help celebrate!
The guitar shop I go to is the only dealer I’m aware of in my entire state who has them. I had never heard of them before, so it was only after the fact that I realized how lucky I was to find mine in person!

I played the one I ended up buying and put it on layaway that first day. It really pleasantly surprised me considering my absolute favorite neck radius tends to be closer to a modern strat 9.5 inch.
 

redking

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I would agree, generally speaking, MIK is pretty good quality these days. The main reason why I tend to not fall in love with a MIK guitar is because of the glossy finish that many of them have in common - I just don't like how it feels. I think with the Eastwood line, the 2 guitars that I bought from them over the last decade - both had weak QC in my opinion. 0 for 2 is a bad day at the plate - lol! I probably won't buy another one - I just wish I could get a Tuxedo model that was perfectly put together because they are super cool.

Maybe I should try a Rivolta instead if Denis has insisted on some North American QC process be implemented. That 12 string looks super cool.
 

redking

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Interestingly, this is how Eastwood has gotten many of these reproduction models off the ground - by crowdfunding the development of a small batch of prototypes to see whether they have any potential as a full production guitar. Mike came to the guitar industry after cashing out big time from the tech industry before the dot-com bubble exploded - so not surprised he has implemented alternative business models with his guitar business.


I think he did kinda the same thing with Jeff Senn, J Backlund and Denis Fano that led to him producing models for them.
 

EnjoGuitar

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Well, they sure look cool. Sound good too, from what I can tell from J. Ronquillo's many demos. Curious where you actually got to try one. Couldn't find one out this way with a divining rod and a compass.

Congratulations, and post some pics of her so we can help celebrate!
Got lucky to find mine, that’s for sure! And thank you! Your wish is my command. Just took these. Needs a new set of strings because I’ve been playing my squier and danelectro lately.
 

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EnjoGuitar

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Rivolta is a partnership between Eastwood guitars (Canadian company that revived the Airline brand when Jack White made the old ones cool) and Denis Fano who is the founder / owner of Novo guitars. I believe Denis designed them and Mike from Eastwood oversees the manufacturing as they are built in the same Korean factory used by Eastwood to build some of their models. (As I understand it, Duesenberg and Reverend guitars are also made in the same factory). You can buy Rivolta guitars from either Eastwood or Novo. (Eastwood also makes some of their lower cost guitars in China, so the higher priced ones on their site are made in Korea and the lower priced ones are made in China)

Thank you for that info! That explains the Duesenberg trem on mine, and I also did recently hear that the Reverend guitars were made in the same factory. I reserved a Reverend Charger HB in Violin Brown, and it seems like it'll be a good player. Very classy looking, too.
 

redking

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Thank you for that info! That explains the Duesenberg trem on mine, and I also did recently hear that the Reverend guitars were made in the same factory. I reserved a Reverend Charger HB in Violin Brown, and it seems like it'll be a good player. Very classy looking, too.
I don't think Duesenberg, Reverend and Rivolta have any association with each other at all corporately, but coming out of the same factory (which I assume is a huge operation) perhaps one can assume certain pieces of hardware might be suggested from time to time between brands. It is interesting that Duesenberg charges double the price for the same guitar, and because it has a German company's name on it, everyone is willing to pay the premium price.
 


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