Rewiring a 335 - any advice?

Smedley Smorganoff

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I got so frustrated and beaten up, I haven't gone back in to finish mine yet (again, too many times already). LOL

I've placed an ad in Craigslist for "Little People" that can get in there and get it done without breaking the cap leads..

Not one response! :wtf:

Congrats! :applause::applause::applause::applause:

Haha, thanks! You can do it man, the key to not getting mad about it is to not give a sh*t. After about the 4th redo, I stopped caring.

There's a guy locally that specializes in hollowbodies, but I didn't wanna give him the satisfaction and my money.


I just convinced myself that I absolutely love the way my DOT sounds, don't need to change a thing

That's probably the best route to take with your 335's - "be happy with what you have".
 

rabidhamster

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Tie string to the pots/switch as you undo them, keep the string long enough to stay threaded thru the body fully as you take the harness out through the pickup route and complete your work.

Once you've completed your rewiring, you use the pre-tied strings to guide the harness back into place. You dont actually do any wiring at all inside the guitar, besides the output jack by necessity.

Make your manual connections secure so when you solder things that only adds to the security, then you have less to worry about manipulating the guts back through into the cavity. then you're only using the f holes for your finger access points to assist in a few minor placements as the strings guide the harness into place.





since you're installing new pots, still tie string onto the old ones and switch too, thread it through and out that way, that way you've already got string guided where it needs to go, just attach to the new stuff when its all wired up. If its not a Gibson, the guitars with mini-pots are tempting to yank out quick thru the sound hole, but then when you go to put the full size pots in - oops, doesnt fit. Now its more difficult to thread string through where it needs to go for you. Womp womp. I assume Gibson uses coathanger wire hooks or something at the factory for such operations from the beginning.
 

Smedley Smorganoff

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Tie string to the pots/switch as you undo them, keep the string long enough to stay threaded thru the body fully as you take the harness out through the pickup route and complete your work.

Once you've completed your rewiring, you use the pre-tied strings to guide the harness back into place. You dont actually do any wiring at all inside the guitar, besides the output jack by necessity.

Make your manual connections secure so when you solder things that only adds to the security, then you have less to worry about manipulating the guts back through into the cavity. then you're only using the f holes for your finger access points to assist in a few minor placements as the strings guide the harness into place.

since you're installing new pots, still tie string onto the old ones and switch too, thread it through and out that way, that way you've already got string guided where it needs to go, just attach to the new stuff when its all wired up. If its not a Gibson, the guitars with mini-pots are tempting to yank out quick thru the sound hole, but then when you go to put the full size pots in - oops, doesnt fit. Now its more difficult to thread string through where it needs to go for you. Womp womp. I assume Gibson uses coathanger wire hooks or something at the factory for such operations from the beginning.

I used plastic tubing that fit over the pot shafts snugly. That way, I wasn't just dragging everything across the floor of the guitar with strings.

The holes were too small for the CTS pot shafts, so I wrapped sandpaper around the tubes and gently f*cked the holes bigger. Way safer and more control than a drill.

Never again, haha....
 

Ph03n1x

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If the pots still work well, why not try switching the magnets in the pickups? I just did this with a 335 (Seventy Seven Exrubato). The stock pickups sounded flat and lacked something. They were A2s, I put an A4 in the bridge and A3 in the neck and left the pickup covers off. Made a big improvement and much less stressful.
 

Smedley Smorganoff

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If the pots still work well, why not try switching the magnets in the pickups? I just did this with a 335 (Seventy Seven Exrubato). The stock pickups sounded flat and lacked something. They were A2s, I put an A4 in the bridge and A3 in the neck and left the pickup covers off. Made a big improvement and much less stressful.

That would have been my plan B if I decided to back out. Once everything was taken out though, it was all or nothing.

The stock pots were 300K linear. I needed 500k audio. I also went with A4 pickups (A4 is the perfect humbucker magnet IMO). Stock pickups were A2 - too muddy, syrupy, and compressed.
 

renderit

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Love everything about that wiring thread. Lots of ideas I hadn't heard before.

Just an aside. I use plastic bag handles to remove knobs. They have the benefit of always being around and they don't make you tug so hard they fly.

I have also stopped using RS Guitarworks caps in my ES types because they will ALWAYS break right at the can if you take them back out. Love the tone, hate the delicacy. Went to Luxe for them as they seem to be a little huskier.
 

Victek

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The stock pickups sounded flat and lacked something. They were A2s, I put an A4 in the bridge and A3 in the neck and left the pickup covers off. Made a big improvement and much less stressful.

How can you find out what magnet type is in a particular pickup? How did the A4 and A3 magnets change the sound and what effect did leaving the pickup covers off have?
 

Smedley Smorganoff

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How can you find out what magnet type is in a particular pickup? How did the A4 and A3 magnets change the sound and what effect did leaving the pickup covers off have?

The manufacturer usually lists it in the specs. Whether it's aftermarket or a stock factory pickup.

Changing from A2 to A3 will lessen the mids and bump up treble. A little less output too. A3 is interesting because it behaves different from the other alnicos. From my experience, it seems to give a little more push of sustain after the initial vibration decay. An overwound A3 in the bridge can be real thick and smoky.

Changing from A2 to A4 will bring up the bass and treble equal to the mids. The EQ becomes more flat as opposed to the mid hump of the A2. More output. This is personally my favorite humbucker magnet. In a way, it's got the sweetness of A2 but the punch and dynamics of A5.

Also, you get a little more treble response and punch with the covers off.
 

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