Retinal Migraine

ehb

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The one I can't control is barometric pressure.
I think all of us migrainies are walking barometers... I've been at the shop before, working on something, and a pressure change edge blast through and I'd almost go to my knees and go crosseyed...like a flashbulb going off...
 

Pennyman

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Ocular migraines, as mentioned, are relatively common. I get them, maybe 2, 3, 4 times per year. I'm apparently one of the fortunate ones who gets the light show but doesn't get the nausea & headaches that often accompanies an OM.

OMs are not actually an eye-related phenomenon; according to my optometrist, it's all about blood pressure in the back of the brain, where the visual center is.

"Retinal" migraines, I've not heard of. What the OP described is quite different from what I experience. For me, when it starts, I get a small pinpoint somewhere in my field of vision that just doesn't quite focus right. This pinpoint will gradually expand into a jagged/curved line across my field of vision, with chevrons or flickering "chaser" lights that run through it. I have on occasion experienced some light-headedness as a side effect, but usually not. The whole thing lasts maybe 20, 30 minutes, then it's gone. Completely gone. No hangover, no dizziness, no nausea, nothing.

Upon describing all this to my optometrist, she said, "Well then, when it happends next, just sit back and enjoy the light show. (Just make sure to pull over if you're driving.)"
 

Pop1655

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Ocular is usually both eyes.
Retinal one eye.

Doc just called. He was pretty chill about the whole thing, then told me the tests I’m getting next week. I’m down with the tests. Stuff an old high mileage guy ought to know anyway.
 

JonCanfield

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My main food triggers that I have been able to deduce myself over the years are a specific chocolate and tomato based stuff... There are other allergies to things but I haven't been able to specifically ID them... Docs just plain don't know...they THINK... I told my doc 40 yrs ago it was allergies... He 'scribed a CT scan as he thought I had a brain tumor...damn contrast almost kilt my big ass dead... Hell of a note... almost died to find out I didn't have a brain tumor...

Tomato: I can eat but in moderation. If I were to eat spaghetti, I would stay away from any tomato based stuff for a couple days....

Chocolate: There is either a specific dark chocolate origin bean or a chemical used in the processing of that specific dark chocolate... I could eat (well, not with the Beetus) ten pounds of Snickers bars with zero ill effects... I can walk into a chocolate shop and if that chocolate is in the room, in a couple seconds it feels like someone just grabbed the back of my neck and is squeezing like crazy... If I were to take a small bite, in short order, blurry vision, mumbling at best, cannot understand others, motor skills out to lunch...

There are others but I haven't been able to nail down a pattern...

A tip for migraine folks: When you feel the pressure (you know) that starts before the pain cranks, fill up a steam humidifier in the room, turn on high and sit in the room for a good while.... If you have a clothes steamer, get in the bathroom with door closed and steam it up for a good while.... Not sure why it helps and sometimes even stops it, but it does....
Soy is one of my triggers. Do you know how hard it is to find food that doesn't have soy? Your chocolate smells sounds like my detergent - I can't walk down that aisle in the grocery store without getting one.
Thanks for the steam tip. I hadn't heard that one before, although when I think about it, a hot shower usually gives me some relief.
 
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DarrellV

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occasionally I'll have an ocular migraine, they look like this; View attachment 301548
Yup! Me too! A jagged rainbow that moves slowly across my vision.. Scared hell out of me the first time!

I haven't had the cloudy one yet... I'm good!

I'm pretty sure i recall this being a visual cortex thing in the brain where the vision stuff gets put together....

Doc said they aren't fatal and don't do lasting damage, but still..

First time it happened it was like my retina was peeling off the back of my eye and falling off. Scared the crap out of me!
 

Thumpalumpacus

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I get migraines sometimes, and one aura of them letting me know it's coming on is blurred vision, tunnel-vision, and floaties in my right eye.

That eye has always had weak blood vessels prone to bursting. I think there's perhaps a hint there, if the migraine is caused by higher blood-pressure (which I don't normally suffer). However, I'm guessing that at least some migraines are caused by HBP, and that right eye of mine is the canary in the coal mine.

It's only a guess. Maybe the same for you, maybe not. Glad you got through it, Pops.
 

KP11520

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Hey Pop, how are you doing?

I've had that happen. Fortunately for me, unlike @KP11520's story, my treatment was painless.

The doc stuck a needle in my eye, and blew a gas bubble in there. I rotated my head for several days, floating the bubble on the retina. The bubble flattened out the retina back onto the wall.

Yeah, mine was bad. They had to go inside my eye and didn't complete the cleanup before the block was wearing off.

One of the two Doctors was Stanley Chang, he was the one who pioneered the argon gas bubble procedure.

Sure enough it ripped again and I was in the OR again in a month. When they work inside the eye, they drill 3 holes in the eyeball, one to use to scrape all the scabbed blood and prop the retina back up, one for a small LED light and one to vacuum out all the vitreous, aqueous and scabs. They dilate the pupil and sew the eyelid open and look through a microscope as they do the work. After a while, the outside of the eyeball turns opaque white and they can't see through because you can't blink and it dries out. That's when they do a corneal abrasion, (IOW, peel a layer bigger than the dilated pupil.) If you've ever scratched your eye, it's like going to a candy store compared to when the block wears off. Pain killers did nothing! I was in AGONY and wish I could OD on pain meds. Both times!

Stay healthy and take care of your eyes!
 

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