Resale value of our beloved Epi's

gsmacleod

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I haven't purchased a new Epi since 2001 but I have a few that I've picked up used over the past few years.

Epi group.jpg


These are the Lester's I currently have; all purchased used and except for two, less than 50% of what they sold for new. I could probably sell most for about what I paid or maybe a little more to the right person.

The two I paid a bit more for are the two on the far right because I wanted them. Both were around 70% of what they would have been new.

Shane
 

cybermgk

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Personally, I don't think they hold their resale value well.
This is an internet legend that just won't go away.

Epiphones, used retain as much value (as a percent of new) as any other mass produced guitar make, particularly when compared to other Asian, mass produced makes. Even Fender and Gibson, MIA only pull a few percentage points, of percent of new, than Epiphones. This is a generalization, of across the board. Yes, custom models, and limited runs will slightly affect used value (because of higher demand is all). And I can't speak on the real high end stuff from Gibson, or others. I speak of the general mass produced models from all the makers (I.E. Gibson Trads, Standards, Studios etc).
 

cybermgk

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I haven't purchased a new Epi since 2001 but I have a few that I've picked up used over the past few years.

View attachment 508412

These are the Lester's I currently have; all purchased used and except for two, less than 50% of what they sold for new. I could probably sell most for about what I paid or maybe a little more to the right person.

The two I paid a bit more for are the two on the far right because I wanted them. Both were around 70% of what they would have been new.

Shane
Less than 50% of new is NOT the average. It is you finding overly motivated buyers. ON AVERAGE, Epiphones sell for 58-65% of new., just like other mass produced makes.
 

gsmacleod

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Less than 50% of new is NOT the average. It is you finding overly motivated buyers. ON AVERAGE, Epiphones sell for 58-65% of new., just like other mass produced makes.

It's more the market for used instruments here from what I can tell. Several of these sat on various marketplace sites for quite some time and as the price dropped, they got to the point of "I don't need it but really can't pass it up for that price."

Shane
 

rbraad68

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It's more the market for used instruments here from what I can tell. Several of these sat on various marketplace sites for quite some time and as the price dropped, they got to the point of "I don't need it but really can't pass it up for that price."

Shane

i like that blk custom in the top left with the p-90's :=)
 

rbraad68

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that special at $379 is probably one of the best guitars for the price out there.

i can't say enough about this guitar. i looked for a used varient of this guitar I didn't find any at the time. I paid 399 from ZZ sounds I believe . I already had an extra hard shell case for it and wound up blacking it out with the replacement blk wrap around bridge for like 18 bucks !! I also bought the black hip shot locking tuners with the kit so i didnt have to drill any holes. So i have just about 500 bucks into the guitar.....
 

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Dino Velvet

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Now with the new models having more correct headstocks, long neck tenons and non weight relieved bodies the older ones are going to have pretty dismal resale for the most part. Except of course for that one you own. Because its pretty special.
 

dspelman

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what is avg price for these things used? I know when i look through the used section of say GC or other sites for good deals on these guitars they can go for as much as 450/475 and a really used one for around 250 ish

What GC asks for used gear shouldn't be used as a guide. Nor should Craigslist "asking" prices, for that matter.
Moreover, there's a pretty wide spread in new prices for Epiphones, and a similar spread in actual used costs, so there isn't an "average."
 

cybermgk

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Now with the new models having more correct headstocks, long neck tenons and non weight relieved bodies the older ones are going to have pretty dismal resale for the most part. Except of course for that one you own. Because its pretty special.
Disagree. Your supposition presumes that everyone prefers the new headstock. Tis simply not true. Quite a few people preferred the old Epi Headstock
 

dspelman

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Then of course you add in the upgrades you make to the guitar.

Those are expenses that aren't recouped in the resale market.
What you call "upgrades" are frequently *not* what a buyer wants, and in my case, it's an indication that someone's been at the internals of the guitar. My experience is that it's rare to find a really good soldering job (including those done by random GC "techs").
 

dspelman

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Disagree. Your supposition presumes that everyone prefers the new headstock. Tis simply not true. Quite a few people preferred the old Epi Headstock

Agreed. Not every LP variant has to have a headstock that looks like a Gibson. It seems to be a requirement for the folks who are embarrassed to be seen with a non-Gibson guitar, but I have a '39 Epiphone Emperor that proudly wears its original headstock, and a series of Agiles that have their own take on headstock design that I sort appreciate. The assumption that the Gibson open book is the benchmark headstock shape is out of whack. IMHO, of course.
 

efstop

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In Canada, an new Epi Junior with that horrible veneer is $549. I bought a 2009 Epi '57 Reissue a couple of years ago for $400 (~$315 US.) Did I overpay? Probably, but although not exactly rare, they don't come up for sale often. And because it's a solid yellow, there's no disconcerting veneer :)

It isn't likely to give me a profit or my money back on resale, but I didn't buy it to sell. It's a cool guitar and plays well. All it has to do.
 

rbraad68

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Those are expenses that aren't recouped in the resale market.
What you call "upgrades" are frequently *not* what a buyer wants, and in my case, it's an indication that someone's been at the internals of the guitar. My experience is that it's rare to find a really good soldering job (including those done by random GC "techs").

I agree with you on the upgrade part but In my honest opinion the electronics in these epi's are shit. Now i know some cases where the guitar comes with the cts pots and all thats not shit. That push pull setup in the 2020 classic i bought really was some cheap ass parts. My 2016 and my 2007 customs had some piss poor electronics and pick ups in it. I deff not worried about if someone redid the electronics in a used guitar i buy because chances are i'm going to replace them anyways...
 

gsmacleod

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i like that blk custom in the top left with the p-90's :=)

That's one of the ones I paid a bit more for. I had almost talked myself into buying a new one when this one appeared on the used market. Grabbed it without a second thought.

Shane
 

Jymbopalyse

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Disagree. Your supposition presumes that everyone prefers the new headstock. Tis simply not true. Quite a few people preferred the old Epi Headstock

And others like myself, could care less either way about the headstock.. :cool2:

Now . . . the tuners on the headstock. That's a different issue.
 

dspelman

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I deff not worried about if someone redid the electronics in a used guitar i buy because chances are i'm going to replace them anyways...

Most of the used guitars I purchase that have NOT had their wiring/pots/pickups molested *work.* I bought one that was "all original" and I discovered that "all original" to this seller meant that everything had been removed, replaced, and then, just before the sale, had the original parts replaced. It was a disaster. If the original parts had been left alone, it would have been a fine guitar. I bought new bits, replaced the disaster, and the guitar was just fine from there.

I don't buy current model Epiphones. My choices in that general price range lean toward Agiles, and those that have their internals left alone are actually pretty good. I have indeed changed bits and pieces here and there, but not because I *needed* to.
 

DigitalTone

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And others like myself, could care less either way about the headstock.. :cool2:

Now . . . the tuners on the headstock. That's a different issue.
When people complain about their headstocks, I legit have to go look at my guitars to see which ones have what.
 

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