Remember the homeless guy, the cop, and the shoes?

WolfeMacleod

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Of course you do!

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deprimo-homeless.jpg





Man given boots by cop begs barefoot despite having a Bronx home and ‘30 pairs of shoes’ - NYPOST.com


Bum given boots by kind-hearted cop is back to begging barefoot
Panhandler has '30 pairs of shoes'



COUNTING HIS BOOTY: Jeffrey Hillman, who was given a pair of boots by a kindly cop last year, counts his day's haul on the subway Sunday after begging — barefoot — in Midtown.

What a heel!

The barefoot beggar who made headlines when a kindly cop gave him a pair of boots has an apartment and a preacher paying his bills — but he still pretends to be homeless and hides his shoes in a garbage bag, The Post has learned.

Jeffrey Hillman was spotted at 9:20 p.m. Sunday counting a huge wad of bills with the dexterity of a bank teller while riding a No. 2 train from Times Square to his home in The Bronx.
AP
Officer DePrimo's act of kindness made headlines around the world after a passerby snapped this pic on his gift on a frigid winter night.

Wetting his thumb and glancing warily at his few fellow passengers, Hillman, 54, deftly counted out a stack of bills, placed it on the seat and started counting another as a Post reporter shot video.

Just days earlier, the alleged grifter was confronted by another Post reporter on Sixth Avenue in Midtown. Mooching cash from passers-by, he was barefoot and wearing a sign on his back that read “HOMELESS.”

Asked about his boots, he replied, “I choose not to wear shoes” — even though a New Jersey clergyman who has been paying Hillman’s utility bills said the man owns at least 30 pairs.

“I have the shoes. People always ask me where are the shoes? I tell them they’re in the bag,” said Hillman, who apparently wears shoes to and from home but sheds them for his Midtown homeless act.

“I choose not to wear the shoes. Is that a crime? No! My feet haven’t fallen off yet,” the defiant panhandler declared, dragging a large black garbage bag behind him.

Asked about the $100 all-weather boots NYPD Officer Larry DePrimo gave him on Nov. 14 in Times Square, Hillman said he had hidden them away because “they are worth a lot of money.”

Hillman insisted that he never asks anyone for cash or gifts and that people simply fork the money over when they pass him as he trudges barefoot through Midtown.

And he shamelessly admitted he has a place of his own, despite the hand-lettered sign on his back.

“I got my own apartment. I cook for myself,” he said.


On Sunday, Hillman started counting his haul shortly after hopping the subway train in Times Square ,and was still counting as it approached a stop at 152nd Street and Westchester Avenue not far from his apartment on Prospect Avenue in The Bronx.

The cash appeared to be mostly singles — but still added up to several hundred dollars, judging from the size of the pile.

And, despite his lucrative scam, he insisted he wasn’t doing anything wrong.

“I’m not robbing anybody. It’s Wall Street. It’s the people in these buildings,” he said.

But the Rev. John Graf of Bedminster, who pays Hillman’s utility bills and buys him phone cards, said it’s wrong to pull the wool over people’s eyes.

“I don’t want him conning me,” said Graf, who has known Hillman since they were in fourth grade. “He promised me that he wouldn’t do that.”

Graf admitted his buddy has a history of working the streets.

“He’s done it 10-plus years. He can make 1,000 bucks a day” even though “he’s got 30 pairs of shoes at home,” he said.


Hillman — an Army vet and the brother of a college professor and a church administrator — has rap sheets in New York and Pennsylvania that stretch back to the early 1980s.

He was most recently busted in New York City in 2008 for possession of a controlled substance.

He had a similar drug bust in 2003 and a number of charges in 2002 for harassment, menacing, criminal mischief, reckless endangerment, possession of stolen property and resisting arrest.

In 1998, he was pinched for public lewdness after allegedly masturbating in front of a crowd in Hamilton Heights.

DePrimo — who put the boots and socks on Hillman’s feet himself — could not be reached.
 

RedSkwirrell

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Sad truth.
There's a paper printed over here called The Big Issue.
It's specifically printed and SOLD to homeless folks to allow them to make some money selling.
Unfortunately this brilliant idea was soon hijacked.
The sellers are often picked up in big Mercedes* at the end of their shift.
They don't belong to charity workers.
There are genuinely homeless people in trouble and need of our help out there.
There are also a bunch of lying, cunning, deceitful, con-men and women taking advantage them and us.
 

Ledheadforlife

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Way I figure it is, if I give a few bucks to a dude on the street who's beggin, even if he's conning me, his job sucks worse than mine and I wouldnt trade him places lol.
 

PapaSquash

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The image in the original post, and the date, remind me of this:
jesus_washing_feet.jpg


One of those guys who got his feet washed took 40 pieces of silver too.

Even if both the doer and recipient of a good deed are flawed, it's still a good deed.
 

Muttering Bill

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Way I figure it is, if I give a few bucks to a dude on the street who's beggin, even if he's conning me, his job sucks worse than mine and I wouldnt trade him places lol.
Except that he's probably making twice as much money as you by just sitting on a street corner. I'll bet your job is a lot more demanding than that.

This is the reason I will never give money to a homeless person on the streets. There's one lady who sometimes sits on the corner, in front of the Starbucks across from my work. She's got a "pity me" sign, an empty coffee cup, Coach sneakers and an iPhone. There's another one I've seen begging for change, wearing a new leather jacket. Really? I'm supposed to believe that these people are homeless and starving, and give them money?

If you want to help the homeless, donate to or volunteer at a shelter.
 

jeff_farkas

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Except that he's probably making twice as much money as you by just sitting on a street corner. I'll bet your job is a lot more demanding than that.

This is the reason I will never give money to a homeless person on the streets. There's one lady who sometimes sits on the corner, in front of the Starbucks across from my work. She's got a "pity me" sign, an empty coffee cup, Coach sneakers and an iPhone. There's another one I've seen begging for change, wearing a new leather jacket. Really? I'm supposed to believe that these people are homeless and starving, and give them money?

If you want to help the homeless, donate to or volunteer at a shelter.

There are charities that hand out new coats/jackets to homeless every winter.. I got one when I was homeless in Knoxville. So I would never go by that to make any kind of judgment. Oh, and in Knoxville at least, being on the street was far safer than the shelters. Less drug dealers to deal with and less stabbings. Really.. The KARM shelter is a dangerous place to be in.
 

confused

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If I choose to give money to someone I believe to be homeless, I probably get as much out of it as they do. He gets a sammich or a coffee, and I feel a bit better.

If he goes back to an apartment afterward and has a T.V. dinner, he still did me a favour.
 

Paracelsian

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Except that he's probably making twice as much money as you by just sitting on a street corner. I'll bet your job is a lot more demanding than that.

This is the reason I will never give money to a homeless person on the streets. There's one lady who sometimes sits on the corner, in front of the Starbucks across from my work. She's got a "pity me" sign, an empty coffee cup, Coach sneakers and an iPhone. There's another one I've seen begging for change, wearing a new leather jacket. Really? I'm supposed to believe that these people are homeless and starving, and give them money?

If you want to help the homeless, donate to or volunteer at a shelter.

LOL dude there are a couple "bums" that are a daily fixture on the off-ramp by my friends house. I saw them "setting up" one day. One dude was carrying the canes and signs, the other carried the chairs and the patched up "vet" jackets. They keep a bottle in a shopping bag too, and claim to be disabled vets. Idiots fill their cups everyday.
 

Muttering Bill

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There are charities that hand out new coats/jackets to homeless every winter.. I got one when I was homeless in Knoxville. So I would never go by that to make any kind of judgment. Oh, and in Knoxville at least, being on the street was far safer than the shelters. Less drug dealers to deal with and less stabbings. Really.. The KARM shelter is a dangerous place to be in.
Fair enough. I'm still not buying it with the iPhone lady though.
 

Skintaster

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Most of the homeless people I've encountered are mentally ill. I don't envy them, or expect them to make decisions that make sense to me. While I generally won't give them $, because I'm not going to fuel an addiction for someone else, I'll buy them food.

I know there are scammers, but those are usually pretty easy to ferret out. I figure that a typical homeless person might be on the street by choice... Maybe... But my life is still easier than theirs. I'm not going to judge them unless some obvious scam is going on.
 

jeff_farkas

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Most of the homeless people I've encountered are mentally ill. I don't envy them, or expect them to make decisions that make sense to me. While I generally won't give them $, because I'm not going to fuel an addiction for someone else, I'll buy them food.

I know there are scammers, but those are usually pretty easy to ferret out. I figure that a typical homeless person might be on the street by choice... Maybe... But my life is still easier than theirs. I'm not going to judge them unless some obvious scam is going on.

Mental illness was my issue that landed me up in the shelter. I barely made it through that.

Jeff
 

Paracelsian

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Most of the homeless people I've encountered are mentally ill. I don't envy them, or expect them to make decisions that make sense to me. While I generally won't give them $, because I'm not going to fuel an addiction for someone else, I'll buy them food.

I know there are scammers, but those are usually pretty easy to ferret out. I figure that a typical homeless person might be on the street by choice... Maybe... But my life is still easier than theirs. I'm not going to judge them unless some obvious scam is going on.

I agree, but at least here there is a plethora of scammers. It got so bad they to pass an ordinance banning them from the 16th street mall, they were there by the hundreds because its a big tourist draw in Denver. Scaring/harassing tourists and such, I gave a guy a couple bucks once and he looked at it after I handed it to him and smirked/shook his head like "thats all?". I saw a Maynard (Tool) interview where he said 16th street was some of the most fubar shvt he has ever seen lol. Its bad in Denver/Boulder.
 

Byron999

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Now, those on a lower rung will be targeting these rich bums.

There is order in the jungle.
 

SteveGangi

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Sad truth.
There's a paper printed over here called The Big Issue.
It's specifically printed and SOLD to homeless folks to allow them to make some money selling.
Unfortunately this brilliant idea was soon hijacked.
The sellers are often picked up in big Mercedes* at the end of their shift.
They don't belong to charity workers.
There are genuinely homeless people in trouble and need of our help out there.
There are also a bunch of lying, cunning, deceitful, con-men and women taking advantage them and us.

There is a "beggar" who "works" the supermarket near my place. At the end of the day, I have watched him climb into a new Mercedes Benz. What a scumbag.
 

Roberteaux

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Then, too, there are those whose living consists of begging who really are beggars in the fullest sense, and are not exactly what anybody would call flush with cash.

I think that these people would be the middle that is excluded, as we consider the idea of homeless beggars who are absolutely impoverished and those who climb into nice cars at the end of the day. There are some who make it on begging, probably living in some low-rent digs or with somebody else... and they're mainly broke, but not as bad off as the street sleepers might be.

My guess is that the abjectly impoverished, who also suffer from some form of mental infirmity, would represent the majority, incidentally.

--R
 

WolfeMacleod

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There is a "beggar" who "works" the supermarket near my place. At the end of the day, I have watched him climb into a new Mercedes Benz. What a scumbag.

Ever heard about the Shaky Lady?

[SIZE=+1]Shady secret of the Shaky Lady (Beggar rakes in the cash, then heads home in a Lumina)[/SIZE]
Toronto Sun ^ | By MIKE STROBEL
Posted on Monday, May 06, 2002 6:09:17 AM by Grig
She wears a shabby red jacket. Her hair is grey and scraggly under a faded purple kerchief. A garbage bag covers her legs. People throw money on it.
Lots of people. Sometimes they line up.
"She got here about 11," says Const. Paul Stone, 50, on traffic duty at a construction site. "She started shaking as soon as she sat down. She's just rakin' it in now."
At Harvey's across the street, photographer Alex Urosevic and I do some figuring.
Thirty people in 15 minutes, Alex counts. Fifty in the time it takes me to eat a veggie burger and sip a coffee.
So, be very conservative and say 50 kind strangers an hour, a toonie each, five hours a day, five days a week.
That's $2,500 a week. Net. I mean, what's the overhead? How much do blue thermal pants and a garbage bag cost?
Several people in the area have told me she usually has two burly men keeping watch over her. Some think they're her sons.
If they're around, I can't spot them in the throngs.
"Please help me. I'm sick and poor. I will pray for you," says the cardboard sign around her neck.
I toss in a toonie. She gives me a toothless grin and croaks. The shaking is remarkable. How could you say no?
Shopkeepers and security staff say she has haunted Bloor between Yonge and Bay for at least a year.
"I was struck by her wretched appearance," says Agnes McKenna, 74, who lives nearby.
"I wondered, how could anybody be so heartless as to dump her on the street?
"A couple of weeks ago, coming home from a meeting, I see this woman suddenly get up, spry as a chicken. Her face becomes alive, she packs up her buggy and off she goes.
"Makes you feel like a fool, to be taken like that."
Toronto Police Const. Andrew Hassall once saw a woman so torn up about the Shaky Lady she bought her a $200 coat at The Bay. The beggar croaked her thanks, waited for the woman to leave, then threw out the coat. Hassall couldn't persuade the kind woman she'd been had.
The Shaky Lady is "the prima donna of this sort of thing," says Hassall. "She's been a thorn in our sides for years."
But the cops are stuck. Panhandling is legal.
For a while, I hide by the construction site behind the Shaky Lady. They are laying fibre-optic cable.
I can see each person approach the woman.
I see horror, pity. I see $10 bills, a few 20s. She tucks them under the bag. I think our income estimate is low.
At 4:30 p.m. she gets up, chucks the sisters' chicken fingers in the garbage and heads west on Bloor. There is no shaking. She moves faster and faster.
... I round the corner. A car, a Chevy Lumina, speeds in reverse.
A man drives, another sits in the back. The Shaky Lady, kerchief off, crouches in the passenger seat.
Caught without cover, I give chase. I can't read the plate. Alex is an alley away, trying to cut them off.
But the Lumina pulls out on Balmuto St., by the Uptown Theatre, then west on Bloor.
By the time I hail a cab and yell "follow that Lumina," it's gone.
Who knows where?
But I'm guessing it's not to a shelter for the homeless.
 

Caleb

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I have pretty decent working relationship with a very convincing panhandler here. He sets up next to a major tunnel entrance every day. Out of curiosity, I once asked him how much he makes during the rush hours. His reply? About a buck a minute. Do the math.
 

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