Regular Maintenance on an r9

astroshagger

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Hi guys:

Just wondering what I should be doing regularly to take care of an R9 (besides string changes)?

The guitar is in a consistent climate/temp range and rarely if ever experiences humidity fluctuation. I love the way the guitar sounds and plays as well, so is there anything I should be doing to keep it this way?

Thanks
 

The Ballzz

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Once a year, I would remove all the strings, clean the fret board nicely with Naphtha, give it a good oiling with mineral oil, re-string it and check/adjust any setup/intonation specs. You could even give the frets a polish job, if you so desire. Then play the strings off of that bad Mo-Fo! Some folks say no to the oiling, but some of it depends on where you live. In my case, I live in Las Vegas and yesterday the relative humidity was 2% and without an annual/semi annual oiling, the fingerboard dries out dramatically, causing many issues including fret sprout, loose frets, cracks, etc.
Just My $.02 & Likely Worth Even Less,
Gene
 

jkes01

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^ Some solid advice. I personally use the StewMac finishing oil. It doesn't feel oily like some of the other products.

As far as regular maintenance, wipe the fretboard and strings as well as any sweat off the guitar after every time you play it.

Every string change, clean it with Gibson pump polish and a soft cloth. Hardware, plastic, everything, except the fretboard.

And most importantly, hang it on the wall or store it in its case when you are not playing it. :thumb:
 

ARandall

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Make a note of your relief setting or bridge height and maybe nut slot depths. That way if something does get out of whack then you can measure to see what has changed. Also if at some stage you get a new nut/bridge/refret you can give these settings to the person doing the work for the re-setup.
 

fumblefinger

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To add my 2c:
Prior to cleaning the FB, take the back (rough) side of a leather scrap and a fret guard and rub the leather over each fret to shine them up. Then clean with naphtha and condition the FB. I like Howard's Feed and Wax, available at Lowes (less cost than the luthier supply houses) over the "lemon oil". I find Meguiar's Show Car Glaze does a better job than any "guitar polish" I've tried. I also keep a micro fiber cloth in all of my cases. A quick go over with it after each use helps keep the gunge down.
 

nadzab

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To add my 2c:
Prior to cleaning the FB, take the back (rough) side of a leather scrap and a fret guard and rub the leather over each fret to shine them up. Then clean with naphtha and condition the FB. I like Howard's Feed and Wax, available at Lowes (less cost than the luthier supply houses) over the "lemon oil". I find Meguiar's Show Car Glaze does a better job than any "guitar polish" I've tried. I also keep a micro fiber cloth in all of my cases. A quick go over with it after each use helps keep the gunge down.
My instincts tell me to avoid putting anything containing wax on a rosewood fretboard - how has the Howard's worked out for you?
 

astroshagger

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Make a note of your relief setting or bridge height and maybe nut slot depths. That way if something does get out of whack then you can measure to see what has changed. Also if at some stage you get a new nut/bridge/refret you can give these settings to the person doing the work for the re-setup.
By "relief setting" you're referring to the truss rod, correct? I've heard that even slight changes in truss rod relief can dramatically affect tone. How do I check for relief?
 

Darkburst

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It's just a guitar. Play the crap out of it. Wipe it down when you're done playing if you're a neat freak. Oil the fret board if it looks dry.
 

Tone_Chaser

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I tie mine to the roof of my truck and go through the car wash.
 

fumblefinger

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My instincts tell me to avoid putting anything containing wax on a rosewood fretboard - how has the Howard's worked out for you?
I don't think you would want to use a "paste wax" on a FB, but this is formulated to preserve wood, not shine it.

I like it because it seems (no empirical evidence here) that the fret boards don't dry out as fast as when I used "lemon oil". They only get this once a year at most. I'm careful not to leave it on too long and scrub excess off with a paper towel followed by an old tee shirt. I initially bought a small bottle from a luthier supply. After trying it on a guitar, I put some on a piece of mahogany furniture. Wow! It really made the grain pop and the wood soaked it up. Again I need to re-apply it on the furniture once a year or so. This tells me it doesn't seal the wood, but helps keep it from drying out.

Unless I find something that definitively indicates it somehow harms the FB, I'll continue to use it.
 

Dilver

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Something that hasn't been mentioned yet: If you start to get divots or flat areas on certain frets, take it to an experienced tech to have the frets recrowned and polished.
 


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