Regarding buffers

framos

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Hi all,

I have a 10-pedal board, where 8 are true-bypass units and the other 2 are buffered (Carl Martin single channel ACtone and Plexitone).

As the CMs have very good buffers in it, I currently do not use any dedicated buffers. These pedals are the 4th and 5th in the chain. My in/out cables are 10' Monster Rock.

Do you think I need any extra buffers in the beggining/end of the chain? Not that I am experiencing a bad tone or anything, just want to be sure I am getting the most out of my gear.

What I could do is (a) replace my Korg Pitchblack true bypass tuner, 2nd in chain, with a BOSS TU-3 I have off-board and (b) switch my TC Flashback from true bypass to buffered with a flick of a switch. Do you think it would help or do more harm than good? Is the Boss TU-3 buffer any good?

Thanks!
 

Stuart_tate41

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If you have two buffered pedals you'll be fine.

I have a Boss DD-3 at the end of my chain for the buffer and to me it doesn't sound any different than if I put it at the front, however you notice when it's not there.

I think there's a lot of crap out there about true bypass and buffered, you have to cut through that crap yourself with your ears.

Try the buffered pedals in different places to see if it effects your tone(It probably won't) then remove them and see the difference. The Boss buffers are fine.

I'm currently building a true bypass looper with a Cornish style buffer on the input it's all fun and games lol
 

kboman

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Do you think I need any extra buffers in the beggining/end of the chain? Not that I am experiencing a bad tone or anything, just want to be sure I am getting the most out of my gear.

I think you're basically answering your own question fully here :)

Does it sound good? If yes, then it is good and you have no reason to worry. I'd try the Flashback in buffered mode (I'm guessing it's last/at the end of your signal chain) to see if there's any difference, then I'd watch Premier Guitar's Rig Rundown with Nels Cline and never worry about this again :D

Good luck! :thumb:
 

framos

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...then I'd watch Premier Guitar's Rig Rundown with Nels Cline and never worry about this again :D
Good luck! :thumb:

".. if I get a decent tone with all this stuff .. who cares?"

Says the man! :thumb:
 

CheopisIV

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With a 10' cable in front, it won't matter where your buffered pedals are so put them where they sound the best with the other pedals.

If you ever use a 20' or longer cable before the board, you'd benefit from a buffer up front to counter the capacitance and dulling of tone from the cable.
 

Paulinator

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I think you're basically answering your own question fully here :)

Does it sound good? If yes, then it is good and you have no reason to worry. I'd try the Flashback in buffered mode (I'm guessing it's last/at the end of your signal chain) to see if there's any difference, then I'd watch Premier Guitar's Rig Rundown with Nels Cline and never worry about this again :D

Good luck! :thumb:

+1. If it sounds good then don't worry about it.

You can try this to verify though: plug straight into the amp with a 10' cable (or shorter), keep in mind how the tone sounds. Then plug your pedalboard in utilizing the same cable, keeping the cable going to the amp as short as possible. If you don't notice any tone loss or volume drop with your pedalboard in bypass then you don't need any more buffers.
 

sonar

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+1. If it sounds good then don't worry about it.

You can try this to verify though: plug straight into the amp with a 10' cable (or shorter), keep in mind how the tone sounds. Then plug your pedalboard in utilizing the same cable, keeping the cable going to the amp as short as possible. If you don't notice any tone loss or volume drop with your pedalboard in bypass then you don't need any more buffers.

You would think this to be the first thing people do anytime (and every time) they set up a chain or even audition a pedal? Simple guitar 101.
 

roeg

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Thats a beautiful explanation by the paulinator,and exactly what you do_OTOH,you might actually like the capacitance modification to tone yer setup gives you!:laugh2:...

I'm reminded by the Stevie Ray Vaughn story when he was advised(i think it was Cesar Diaz,as his tech) to give up his curly guitar chords because the extra capacitance of the coils was sucking some freq(taming the high end!) in his signal and it would be far better to go with quality straight chord.Steve responded “I hate these things.” ....“They pass to much electricity.” :lol:

In the end,go with what sounds best to you.Personally,on both my boards,i prefer one buffer to keep the sparkle on my Lespauls :)...or for me,as close to the" one chord straight into the amp" sound as possible.
 
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i got a question as well, if you get a buffer and throw it first in the chain, will the fix the volume drops experienced when engaging certain pedals
 

kboman

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Unlikely. I'm sure the experienced builders here have more to say but that's more a case of how the pedal in question works (or doesn't, as the case may be).
 

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