Refinish top on a classical guitar?

Ph03n1x

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I have a nice 80s MIJ classical guitar that probably isn't collectable. It got knocked over and this caused a big scratch on the surface in addition to a few other marks. The finish is poly and I was considering refinishing the top since I have 2x clear nitro spray cans (amber tint and completely clear). The rosettes are often just superficial on classical guitars right? So would I have to complete avoid sanding that part of the guitar?

Ideally I would refinish the neck as well because the poly is going cloudy there but I feel like I don't want to do all that effort.
 

Davey Rock

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I have a nice 80s MIJ classical guitar that probably isn't collectable. It got knocked over and this caused a big scratch on the surface in addition to a few other marks. The finish is poly and I was considering refinishing the top since I have 2x clear nitro spray cans (amber tint and completely clear). The rosettes are often just superficial on classical guitars right? So would I have to complete avoid sanding that part of the guitar?

Ideally I would refinish the neck as well because the poly is going cloudy there but I feel like I don't want to do all that effort.
I'm not sure about the rosettes being synthetic on classicals but what I would do is this. 1 of 2 things.

1 you could buy some minwax polyurethane. Mix it 50/50 with thinner to make wipe on poly. (Buying wipe on poly is a waste of money/it may not be the exact consistency you want) and wipe on several coats until you feel it is good enough to buff and polish. This personally is my favorite Because the poly is so thin that it flattens out and dries similar to water. Giving you better shine when you polish.

2 if you choose nitro especially in cans just be careful. Best thing to do, is multiple very very thin coats. I prefer wipe on myself because it's easy to make sure the costs aren't too thick. Especially on acoustic. If the finish is too thick, especially on a classical that uses nylon strings, the acoustic volume and tone will be greatly altered. The best a guitar solid or hollow will ever sound is with not finish bare wood. Although you cant really tell, it is apparent when comparing the two.


That's my input, but with nitro it's important to stay away from lacquer thinner. Nitro never truly cures so it will basically just turn to slop upon contact.
 


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