Recording

LP121

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I could've posted this in the recording sub forum, but it's not really a nuts and bolts question.

When you folks record, how do you fight the tendency to "tighten up"?

I swear, when I go to record something, I takes me like 20 takes to get it right. Even things I've played perfectly 1000 times.

I've played on stage dozens of times and never had a problem with stage fright. I don't think it's that, though it could be a form of it I guess.

What say you?
 

Alligatorbling

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i use a built in metronome on my multi tracker so i stay in the pocket, and it helps me focus.

i will also jam with the metronome for a little bit to get loose.
 
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Sct13

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Keep it musical....perfection can sound too practiced...

I used to be worried about ultra tightness, but a live looser fell gives some music breath
 

Frogfur

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Music has a certain aliveness to it that is essential to a good recording.
It's what's missing in today's over processed music.
Take it easy. Run thru it along with the play back to get the groove going.
 

Howard2k

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I guess I just need to loosen up and play. Not worry about it being recorded.
Recording for me is typically recording over a backing track. I just press record when I pick up the guitar and then stop afterwards. As I record I make notes of the specific times of bits I want to keep. So if I'm trying to record a cover of You Shook Me All Nite Long I can just put the song on repeat, keep playing over it, and then chop and keep the parts I like. There's no "stop/start" with associated "no pressure/pressure" since I'm just recording all the time.

Not sure if that would work in your situation.
 

Frogfur

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I just finished months of hard work with some other folks. Part of the time spent in travel for us. But when you're on take 9 of a critical track, your not much different than the pros. YouTube is full of Beatles in the studio on take 37 of Penny Lane etc.
To get it just right. I'm pretty picky for sure, but i also know that simpler is better at times. Do you have virtual tracks avaliable ? Can you if necessary punch in and out ?
 

LP121

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Recording for me is typically recording over a backing track. I just press record when I pick up the guitar and then stop afterwards. As I record I make notes of the specific times of bits I want to keep. So if I'm trying to record a cover of You Shook Me All Nite Long I can just put the song on repeat, keep playing over it, and then chop and keep the parts I like. There's no "stop/start" with associated "no pressure/pressure" since I'm just recording all the time.

Not sure if that would work in your situation.
I record with backing tracks occasionally. I can keep the good parts.

In my case, it’s this odd psychological thing where I have to get it right the first time. Which never happens. Almost like you feel pressured to not mess up.
That's it right there. That's what I'm fighting.

I just finished months of hard work with some other folks. Part of the time spent in travel for us. But when you're on take 9 of a critical track, your not much different than the pros. YouTube is full of Beatles in the studio on take 37 of Penny Lane etc.
To get it just right. I'm pretty picky for sure, but i also know that simpler is better at times. Do you have virtual tracks avaliable ? Can you if necessary punch in and out ?
I could probably do that. I'll have to give that a try.
 

James R

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I could've posted this in the recording sub forum, but it's not really a nuts and bolts question.

When you folks record, how do you fight the tendency to "tighten up"?

I swear, when I go to record something, I takes me like 20 takes to get it right. Even things I've played perfectly 1000 times.

I've played on stage dozens of times and never had a problem with stage fright. I don't think it's that, though it could be a form of it I guess.

What say you?
Most people would think that I’m the last person in the world that should be answering this question, because most people have no idea that I record myself fairly regularly.
I know you said you have no problems playing live, but I really do, and I’m talking about playing in front of a couple people at most - not an actual crowd.
I get very tight whenever someone is watching, so I decided the best way to combat that is to always have someone watching... my iPhone.
I try to play for 60-90 minutes a day minimum, so I always use my phone camera or voice memo to record the last 20-30 minutes of my playing.
I don’t do anything with it, most times I delete it without ever having listened to it, but I record myself nonetheless.
It’s now to the point where after a minute or two, I forget that the thing is even there, which means I’ve obviously become more comfortable with it.

So yeah, long story short, do it until it just becomes part of the routine.
If I were you, I would record everything and keep only what you want, delete the rest.
 

Howard2k

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Most people would think that I’m the last person in the world that should be answering this question, because most people have no idea that I record myself fairly regularly.
I know you said you have no problems playing live, but I really do, and I’m talking about playing in front of a couple people at most - not an actual crowd.
I get very tight whenever someone is watching, so I decided the best way to combat that is to always have someone watching... my iPhone.
I try to play for 60-90 minutes a day minimum, so I always use my phone camera or voice memo to record the last 20-30 minutes of my playing.
I don’t do anything with it, most times I delete it without ever having listened to it, but I record myself nonetheless.
It’s now to the point where after a minute or two, I forget that the thing is even there, which means I’ve obviously become more comfortable with it.

So yeah, long story short, do it until it just becomes part of the routine.
If I were you, I would record everything and keep only what you want, delete the rest.

Ditto. I record pretty much everything.

In theory:
* It’ll be nice to look back on it in 1, 2, 5 years and see how much I’ve improved. And
* when improvising I might accidentally play something that doesn’t suck and might want to try to recreate it afterwards.


And partly for the same reasons you mentioned - get over the fear.
 

spitfire

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I am very aware of the phenomenon, but have no sure answer.

I try to remind myself it doesn't matter. I'm using a DAW, at home, I'm not wasting tape or anyone else's time. I've also decided I do not have to get it all in one take. Then oddly, I'm more likely to get better takes that way.

But in the end, I'm usually taking the best bits of many takes.

However, no matter what, just knowing you are recording create stress.

I don't gig, but I also find something similar any time I play with someone else around. Suddenly I can't remember how to play anything. "Really, honest I know how to play this just like the record, but for some reason I have forgot how to play guitar just now."
 

Freddy G

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Purely psych. Record all the time, that way you will minimize the "red light fever". If you think of it this way it might help.....hard drive space is virtually free. You can record a thousand takes. Record every day as a routine, it helps to get used to it and be totally unfazed. When I record someone else, I always do a pass where I tell them I'm not recording, just getting the sound right or levels or whatever lie....but I do always record them. Very often that take has the best feel.
 

John Ucol

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Just play it over and over until it becomes second nature. Definitely get more accustomed to that practice, that way of playing your stuff. Play it over and over as long as it takes, as long as you'd like.
Even if you've covered it live, recording can be a different beast altogether more often than not.
Especially in the former, where listeners are often too drunk or too high (or both) to really give a crap.

When it comes to recording, sometimes it's like being in a vacuum with nobody else from the band to feed off for getting your parts down. Some of the stuff I'm accustomed to playing is inherently more precise and technical with much less room for 'feel' or 'breath,' much less room for error, so there's definitely a need to not get so tense while trying to pull that stuff off.
 
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Neffco

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My drummer was nervous this evening. No need to worry I said, the tracks are free. Now if I could just get this damn thing to play the track back is another thing I said along with more mild cursing.
Much more frustrating when you are paying for it by the hour.
 

TheDevice

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If your not paying hunders of dollars an hour an sitting in front of platinum producers, engineers and musicians it just a thing. Frustrating at most so don't sweat it.
 

CRobbins

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With our band, our philosophy for recording is "live in the studio". I have everything miced, and a few baffles around the drums, and we just play, have fun, and record. Sometimes we get an okay take, and sometimes we dont. Next time we'll try again.
 

Sct13

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Red Light Fever.....yep...I get that all the time...

As a band we record live at practice, then I post it up on soundcloud so the guys can hear it....much experimentation with the mic placement, and whatnot. but the best takes are usually the first ones, because they are looser, more free without the pressure....its consecutive takes that begin to show a lack of consistency....Its better not to push that button. Much confidence is gained that way.

When I record at home, usually to a backing track, I try to just hit the record button and go...the freeer the take the better the flow. If I have to hit that more than two or three times, I move on to something else and come back later....My brain will chew on ideas (or even cover tunes)... like its organizing itself for the next take....but time in between is essential.
Its different for everyone.
 


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