R8 2017 fretboard Quality issue

Moni

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Those go for about $4,200 US used Mint and what you paid in Euros comes to $3,200 US.

It’s not enough damage to make it a bad sale in my opinion, you saved $1,000 US. If it isn’t an issue while playing it I’d just keep it.

If I had paid top dollar I would return it but this would be acceptable given the big discount already.

That being said I would love to see the rest of the guitar. Any pictures?
 
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AJK1

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This is why I buy Jap made Tokai’s
They are flawless
 

rabidhamster

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If it sounds good and plays good I think I’d keep it and not let that bother me, but I haven’t just paid 3k for something, so who knows what I’d really do.
If it’s worth it to you to spend however much more it would cost you to get another one just to not have that issue, then send it back while you still can. Judging from the responses here if it came time to sell on the next buyer may not like that fretboard “feature” either.
 

Pappy58

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To chime in on the fretboard dryness.. the 2019 SG I have suffered from it.. I was initially disappointed because I thought it was just a light cut of rosewood.. after some dunlop lemon oil.. the darkness I was hoping for showed up perfectly.. the cloth I used to rub the oil in was dirty.. every new Gibson I’ve bought needed attention with some oil. It’s like a dust from the buffing compound I’m guessing? I don’t mind one bit to do that upon replacing the strings for the replacing the strings for the first time.. others would return such an item.. but different strokes I guess

here’s a photo of before and after.. months later it’s still dark for the most part..

View attachment 399365
^^THIS^^...you can clean it up and make it much better without a lot of effort. Doing this is part of the initial setup I do on any guitar I buy, new or used. Rosewood can be easily smoothed and needs a little oil until it's well broken in with human fingers. :cheers2:
 

Moni

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^^THIS^^...you can clean it up and make it much better without a lot of effort. Doing this is part of the initial setup I do on any guitar I buy, new or used. Rosewood can be easily smoothed and needs a little oil until it's well broken in with human fingers. :cheers2:
Agreed, the OP got $1,000 off what the going price was for that and it wasn’t a new guitar. Probably previously owned by someone that didn’t take care of the fretboard and was in a dry climate.

Can’t blame Gibson for everything like some comments I’ve read here. That being said I’ve purchased new Gibsons with inexcusable tool marks in the fretboard.:laugh2:
 

Pleximan

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If you really love the guitar and it bothers you. I'd just hit the fretboard with a little bit of fine sandpaper maybe 800 or 1000 grit a couple times, until it smoothes out. I'd put some fretboard oil down afterwards. Just oiI the whole board. I use F1 oil, a little polish and it would be perfect.
 

Derald

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I’ve had guitars from Gibson with fretboards like that and I never knew it was not acceptable. I just figured it was how they came. I knew ebony boards are super smooth but rosewood I figured was grainy. I didn’t think Gibson filled in Rosewood boards they just cut and sanded them. Personally it doesn’t affect me with a board like that but certainly would return it if it did bother me. I’ve returned Gibson’s for less issues.
 

moreles

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Since it wasn't bought as new, this is a dead issue, IMO. Those depressions would be unacceptable in a new instrument and grounds for return. That's not the case here. Used guitars are not perfect. Can't be sure from the pics, but those look like bad depressions to me, and I wouldn't like them on a $500 guitar, let alone this one. That being said, I am confident I could fix them relatively easily and effectively -- and not by blending them in by removing even more wood, via sanding, which is crazy and ill-advised! -- so I would not be wound up about it. If it were sold as new, I would be incensed; sold as used, it comes with the territory.
 

Moni

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Since it wasn't bought as new, this is a dead issue, IMO. Those depressions would be unacceptable in a new instrument and grounds for return. That's not the case here. Used guitars are not perfect. Can't be sure from the pics, but those look like bad depressions to me, and I wouldn't like them on a $500 guitar, let alone this one. That being said, I am confident I could fix them relatively easily and effectively -- and not by blending them in by removing even more wood, via sanding, which is crazy and ill-advised! -- so I would not be wound up about it. If it were sold as new, I would be incensed; sold as used, it comes with the territory.
Sanding doesn't remove that much wood.
 

KenG

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That guitar has been used. look at the grunge on the fretboard! Clean it first of all and see how it looks after that.
 

myoldfriend

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Sanding doesn't remove that much wood.
Actually sanding can remove as much wood as you have time for, up to and including ALL the wood. ;)

There are many problems with sanding a fretboard on a finished guitar. It is difficult if not impossible to sand the FB wood close to the frets - that is if you sand properly (with the grain). And even if you could avoid damaging the neck binding, you will most likely end up with a badly scalloped FB. How would you preserve the FB radius? Etc., etc...

As we all know, rosewood is a natural material and as such will contain imperfections. If one can live with the imperfection(s) that get past QC, then enjoy! Otherwise, do what you have to do.

YMMV.
 

Pleximan

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Actually sanding can remove as much wood as you have time for, up to and including ALL the wood. ;)

There are many problems with sanding a fretboard on a finished guitar. It is difficult if not impossible to sand the FB wood close to the frets - that is if you sand properly (with the grain). And even if you could avoid damaging the neck binding, you will most likely end up with a badly scalloped FB. How would you preserve the FB radius? Etc., etc...

As we all know, rosewood is a natural material and as such will contain imperfections. If one can live with the imperfection(s) that get past QC, then enjoy! Otherwise, do what you have to do.

YMMV.
You're totally over thinking the simplicity of fixing the fretboard. 800 or 1000 grit sandpaper is very fine. You're just sanding what is rough on the fretboard. Not the frets. It's super easy to do, and as long as you're careful and take your time it does no harm to the board. You're not going to sand down to the truss rod. How do you think you make a fretboard smooth? You sand it. The fretboard radius really doesn't come in play unless you're drunkly sanding the frets off. J.S.
 

Moni

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Actually sanding can remove as much wood as you have time for, up to and including ALL the wood. ;)

There are many problems with sanding a fretboard on a finished guitar. It is difficult if not impossible to sand the FB wood close to the frets - that is if you sand properly (with the grain). And even if you could avoid damaging the neck binding, you will most likely end up with a badly scalloped FB. How would you preserve the FB radius? Etc., etc...

As we all know, rosewood is a natural material and as such will contain imperfections. If one can live with the imperfection(s) that get past QC, then enjoy! Otherwise, do what you have to do.

YMMV.
That’s nonsense, respectfully.

Nobody’s using a belt sander :laugh2:

Would it help if I told you I’m a guitar tech?
 

Danelectro

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I looked at the photos twice and I can’t say that I can see much of a defect. Maybe I’m just use to Gibson guitars being less than perfect. If I expected every one of my Les Pauls to be perfect, then I suppose that I would probably only have half as many of them as I do. OP says “ Guitar is awesome”. I say step away from the microscope and play that thang.
:dude:
 
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Jewel the Sapphire

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Hello,

I read this forum for a while but I have never posted, and sorry for my english too :).

I purshased a r8 online (2017) , (good price: 2900 euros new) and i'm in the return policy windows.
Guitar is awesome, 8lbs 6oz, good feeling ,gound sound, very nice neck size but:
- There is like chips or small wood tear :







is it bad and dangerous in long terme or acceptable ?

Thanks in advance because it i return the guitar there is none at all at this price :)
:welcome:

It is not bad/dangerous for long term ownership. That is acceptable to some although most members on the forum may say unacceptable. Congratulations on the Les Paul either way!
 

boola1

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I've got a couple of these on my 2013 R8. Never noticed them until I saw this thread. Don't affect my guitar in any way.

After 20 years of playing, they'll probably be nicely filled with skin and oil.
 

DanD

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It won't take nearly 20 years if the guitar is played regularly.
 


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