Quick 3d modeling tutorial, Rhino

pimiboj

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Hello,

Is there anyone who can help me with my question listed a few posts above here?
I cant find how to make this smooth as you guys have.
 

temol

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Hi

I'd like to present the result of collaboration between me and my friend (cnc guy, Rhino user). Would be nice to hear your opinion about this model of '59 top. Some specs - 4.4 deg neck plane, 1.2 pickup plane, 15.9 mm maximum top thickness. Modeled with Rhino and t-splines using reference photos from MLP members builds and dimensions taken from T. Bartlett plan. Model still needs some finishing work (some surface bumps). Also I am not sure if shape of the neck plane is correct.










T.
 

45WinMag

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There's a number of ways to model a top carve but here's a method I use sometime. It's a basic freeform modeling technique that's really fun.

This example isn't vintage accurate or anything, it's just a method of modeling.

First, cut the perimeter of the upper horn and extend it parallel and draw a centerline roughly as this pic.



Loft the two curves.

Do you perform the loft with the two curves on the same plane and then start raising control points, or do you raise the centerline to the height of the top before lofting? I did my loft with the centerline raised before the loft, and I get a ridge that is proving difficult to smooth out.

I am also wondering, how do you CNC route an angled pickup cavity, since most CNC routers (at least the ones within reach of a typical guitar builder) cannot undercut. Do most of you revert to templates and handheld routers, or do you construct a jig to hold the body at an angle? I'm leaning toward using an ordinary template, since I wouldn't have to have different routines for single-pickup and two-pickup guitars (I always route a single-pickup guitar internally for two pickups, just to make it easy if I ever want to add the second pickup later).

One more question: when modeling the fretboard, will it be sufficient to draw a line where the fret goes or will I need to actually model a .023 cutout for most CAM programs to recognize that there will need to be a cut?
 

Ken McKay

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Answers:
Either way is fine. If you route your pup cavities while the body is flat you might consider making the them a little wider 0.01 or so so the pup can be tilted in the cavity without bumping the bottom edge, (not floor).

lines are good enough. In fact 0.023 cavities are just going to be confusing. you can router along curves if you model them at the 12 inch radius or route them flat if you don't and the edges will eventually be shallower with a bigger gap under the fret in the middle.
 

GooCart

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Do you perform the loft with the two curves on the same plane and then start raising control points, or do you raise the centerline to the height of the top before lofting? I did my loft with the centerline raised before the loft, and I get a ridge that is proving difficult to smooth out.

I am also wondering, how do you CNC route an angled pickup cavity, since most CNC routers (at least the ones within reach of a typical guitar builder) cannot undercut. Do most of you revert to templates and handheld routers, or do you construct a jig to hold the body at an angle? I'm leaning toward using an ordinary template, since I wouldn't have to have different routines for single-pickup and two-pickup guitars (I always route a single-pickup guitar internally for two pickups, just to make it easy if I ever want to add the second pickup later).

One more question: when modeling the fretboard, will it be sufficient to draw a line where the fret goes or will I need to actually model a .023 cutout for most CAM programs to recognize that there will need to be a cut?
For this method I have all the curves at the same plane when I loft them, then I raise the center control points.
 

45WinMag

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Thanks!

This is one of the most informative threads I've seen.
 

philipp25

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Hello i am also studying industrial designer. i build a ukulele last year and now i want to try to build a les paul. I m also new to rhino.. but i am really good in solidworks.i put myself the challange to build the LP in rhino first and use the data for cnc machining.

i already started the body, made the cutouts for the cavities. But now i stuck at the carved top.. i read all posts of the thread but the methods do not work. If it follow the instructions by GooCart and loft between the extended outline and the centered line rhino creats two polysurfaces. Only if i tick the rebuild option in the loft menu it's one surface. But then it doesn't match my outline. So i don't know what i am doing wrong :(

maybe somebody could help me?
kind regards,
philipp
 

GooCart

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My guess is that your perifer/ outline curve is made of two joined curves, that could explain why you end up with a polysurface. But without seing your curves I can't be more precise.
 

45WinMag

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Hello i am also studying industrial designer. i build a ukulele last year and now i want to try to build a les paul. I m also new to rhino.. but i am really good in solidworks.i put myself the challange to build the LP in rhino first and use the data for cnc machining.

i already started the body, made the cutouts for the cavities. But now i stuck at the carved top.. i read all posts of the thread but the methods do not work. If it follow the instructions by GooCart and loft between the extended outline and the centered line rhino creats two polysurfaces. Only if i tick the rebuild option in the loft menu it's one surface. But then it doesn't match my outline. So i don't know what i am doing wrong :(

maybe somebody could help me?
kind regards,
philipp
I didn't just extend the outline, I drew a new line on top of the outline, from the center point of the bottom of the guitar to the extended portion.
 

pshupe

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I've never used Solidworks but I like Rhino's interface and the ability to use the measure tools. Fusion 360 is very intuitive and I think a little easier to learn. I never used the RhinoCAM but CAM in Fusion is very good and easy to learn. Obviously the cloud stuff takes a bit to get used to and is really good if you share with others or work from different computers all the time. I think the price of Fusion also beats Rhino. I believe Solidworks to be in a different strat as far as price. It's probably 10x Fusion.

Cheers Peter.
 

UNborn

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This was such useful tread for many years I am wondering what happened to these photos of modeling in Rhino I can't see them anymore :| , is there any way you can repost them? @GooCart or anybody that has those?
 


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