Quick 3d modeling tutorial, Rhino

McOmio

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Build the surface.


I have a question for you.

Lately Im trying to get started in Rhino ,and so far I'm statisfied ,but i always seem to get stuck when it comes to ,what you call; "build the surface" :)

To be precise,I've done almost a whole neck but i have to build transition surfaces.
It looks like this:



Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance

Mario
 

Gothika777

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I wish I could help u but as far as these matters go I know knowthing.

Maybe u join the heel and the neck with some curves that are in the same plane (could be achieved by copying the curve?) and then go to surface>planar curves to build a surface

EDIT: the curves are not planar but you'll have to draw some and then use something in the surface menu to make a surface from them
 

Neil Morgan

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Mario,

Firstly I would use surface from planar curve to build the upper most heel surface as one rather than the two separate surfaces you have at the moment. Then try using network surface selecting the four open surface edges you've used to define the heel transition area, mess with the options dialogue regarding position and tangency and providing the rest of your geometry is good you should be ok.
 

foq1978

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Back to the body,
here I used a 4,7 mm radius around the perimeter that decrease to zero at the neck joint.

I hope it's not to late to ask, but how did you decrease the radius of the fillet at the neck joint?

Thank you very much!
 

Kammo1

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Just want to say I'm just touching the surface of doing CNC stuff but man you guys are absolutely amazing and I take my hat off to you guys as this is fantastic stuff "CHEERS!" keep em coming.
 

aeronius

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Just had to share some of my models. I do all of my initial design work in Adobe Illustrator, export that as a .dxf, and import that into Rhino. I find the drawing tools in Illustrator to be much more friendly, and I like to plan everything out before I start the modeling process.

Here's my semihollow singlecut (still a work in progress):







And the top of my doublecut (also a work in progress):

 

foq1978

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Looking pretty good, aeronius! looking forward to seeing updates.
 

rockappalla

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How do you build the surface on the top? Surface from curve network?
I'm trying to make a les paul top but I always have problems in the cutaway...
I'd love a step by step tutorial on building a complex surface like that, thank you guys!
 

duff

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How do you build the surface on the top? Surface from curve network?
I'm trying to make a les paul top but I always have problems in the cutaway...
I'd love a step by step tutorial on building a complex surface like that, thank you guys!
cut the cutaway out with a boolean. First model it symetrical, then cut the shape out. That's how i do it.. I wish i wasn't so damn busy with work so i could actually model some more fun stuff.

need to finish this one.
 

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rockappalla

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Ok, here's my file in 3dm, I just can't build the surface from network curves...help? :hmm:
Please note that the curves are not in any way precise, they are only there to try to find a way to build the surface, once i'll able to build it i'll draw precise curves...

I zipped the file, I couldn't upload it directly in .3dm

Thanks!
 

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ordenes10

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hi. i am new in this thread. isnt it more easy to take the real thing and make a 3 D scan?
I scanned some orig. fenders in the past to have a full 3 d model.then i lasercut the templates. great result.
 

GooCart

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There's a number of ways to model a top carve but here's a method I use sometime. It's a basic freeform modeling technique that's really fun.

This example isn't vintage accurate or anything, it's just a method of modeling.

First, cut the perimeter of the upper horn and extend it parallel and draw a centerline roughly as this pic.



Loft the two curves.



On the bass side you have the control points of the surface created by the loft. Add points so you have something like the treble side on the pic.



OK, now it's starting to be interesting. Rotate the three control points columns in the middle -4 degrees from the front end of the guitar, deselect the points where the neck plane is and rotate the rest 3 degrees. That leave you with a 4 deg. neck plane and a 1 deg. pup plane



Extrude the perimeter and cut the surface. Cut the extrude with the surface and join.



This is a quick method of modeling the top carve. You'll need to tweak the points quite a bit to achieve the vintage style carve but it's quite fun and not that hard. A trick can be to start with fewer points just to get the basic top carve and add points where you want harder transitions.
 

rockappalla

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There's a number of ways to model a top carve but here's a method I use sometime. It's a basic freeform modeling technique that's really fun.

This example isn't vintage accurate or anything, it's just a method of modeling.

First, cut the perimeter of the upper horn and extend it parallel and draw a centerline roughly as this pic.



Loft the two curves.



On the bass side you have the control points of the surface created by the loft. Add points so you have something like the treble side on the pic.


OK, now it's starting to be interesting. Rotate the three control points columns in the middle -4 degrees from the front end of the guitar, deselect the points where the neck plane is and rotate the rest 3 degrees. That leave you with a 4 deg. neck plane and a 1 deg. pup plane



Extrude the perimeter and cut the surface. Cut the extrude with the surface and join.


This is a quick method of modeling the top carve. You'll need to tweak the points quite a bit to achieve the vintage style carve but it's quite fun and not that hard. A trick can be to start with fewer points just to get the basic top carve and add points where you want harder transitions.
WOW MAgnus! Thank you very much for the time you spent doing this tutorial!
I can't wait to get home to try it out! you rock:dude:

I was stuck with the curve network surface, here i see you have to use a loft,which seems to be more friendly...I hope to make some progress!
 

rockappalla

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I don't get this passage:
how do you go from this shaped surface


to this actual shape of the guitar? how do you trim it?
 

GooCart

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To cut the top carve surface you need to have something to cut it with. You can use a curve, a surface or a polysurface. In this case I extruded the perimeter curve through the top carve surface and used the extruded surface to trim the top carve surf with the "Split" tool. Then I trimmed the extruded surface with the top carve surface with the same tool. Then it's just to join the two trimmed surfaces in to a polysurface.

If I had the time I could do a more detailed freeform modeling tutorial, but I hope you get the idea.
 

duff

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rockapalla, first make a "mold" of the lp shape, so u have a block with inside an lp contour cut out. Then use that block to cut your symetrical model. Like baking heart shaped cookies :)

 


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