Question about effectively shielding a LP using shielding paint?

irocdave12

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This post will likely be filled with faulty information and assumptions gathered in my brain over the years so you’ve been warned. I will lay out my proposed plan and the experts can flag any bad ideas or flat out wrong techniques planned. I’m planning on using a combination of copper foil tape and mostly shielding paint so here’s what I have in mind.....
1. Paint the entire control cavity a few times over the course of a few days.
2. Foil tape the under side of the cavity cover so when installed it will make connections with the conductive paint coating the cavity and rim.
Now for the grey areas...
1. I think I need to paint everything right? The 3 way switch and pup routes too so that the paint forms one continuous coat and connection. I’ve got a bunch of hobby brushes I will bend to allow me to get into the tight areas hopefully.
2. Do I need to make a small piece of wire with an eyelet screwed to the shield painted side wall of cavity with other end soldered to a pot? (Possible overkill and unecessary?) I honestly don’t know
3. Reason I wanted to foil the back side of the cover is obviously you need to complete the shielding cage first and foremost but also because it was told to me at some point years ago its thought one of the main reasons static gets into the circuit on some guitars was the smooth polished surface of the cover rubbing against your clothes creating static electricity in the right conditions. And seems logical because a few years back Gibson changed to using textured cavity covers and advertised them as having shielding qualities or noise abatement somehow. I figured it was as simple as them taking away the smooth static generating surface and there was probably no actual shielding in the plastic cover. Couldn’t tell you either way.
Anyone see any red flags or plan old missed steps I need to watch out for? Before anyone asks I don’t know for sure if I have a noise problem or not. Probably no. But I am rebuilding a LP from bare with new everything except for the pick ups getting re used and just want it to be the best it can possibly be and especially not have to go back in a fix it later. Rather do it now and not need it. Considering Epiphone does shielding paint on the their budget models I figure it certainly can’t hurt anything at the very least
 

CB91710

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Honestly, I've never felt the need to shield a humbucker-equipped guitar.
More problems can be caused by a poorly done shielding/grounding job than by simply not doing it at all.

Your pickups are shielded from behind by the backing plate.
They are shielded from the top by the strings (yes, 60hz has a wavelength measured in FEET, not mm).
The conductors are shielded.
There is so little exposed single-conductor wiring that the improvement would not be worth the effort.

To do it properly, all cavities need to be shielded, and all cavities need to be connected with a ground wire (since you aren't going to be able to foil-shield the passages)

IMHO, the only thing really worth spending the time on is the control cavity and cover.
Shield the cavity (it will ground through the pots), and wrap the shielding up onto the face where the cover seats.
Cover the cover and screw it down.

Just use copper tape... the carbon paint is horribly expensive and results are pretty inconsistent when people have checked it with a meter.
 

ARandall

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The biggest antenna for RF is the wire run from switch to jack......and thats the only one you can't do.
Modern Les Pauls have the wires inside a shielded multistrand cable.
 

WhiteEpiLP

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I've seen people use the copper tape to shield the control cavity and cause a grounding issue where the shielding goes it to the drill hole for the input jack, if you put the tape around that drill hole you have to make sure when a patch cord is plugged in that it doesnt touch the tape. The jack can touch the bare wood and not have an issue but the tape will ground it out.
If you are having issues with buzz it's almost always something in the environment around you like a dimmer switch or an ungrounded outlet.
 

irocdave12

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And that's the most effective shielding mod you can do...
What can i do if I’m using the vintage braided 50’s style wiring anything? So you think I should leave the cavites un shielded and just try to do something from the switch to jack run?
 

CB91710

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What can i do if I’m using the vintage braided 50’s style wiring anything? So you think I should leave the cavites un shielded and just try to do something from the switch to jack run?
That is self-shielded. The braid is gounded in the control cavity and to the pickup.

The noise problems are more prevalent on Fender designs where an untwisted pair comes off of the pickup, and all of the internal wiring is single conductor without a shield.

If you have P90s or a Strat, it's going to hum and there's nothing you can do.
 

Mockbel

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Did it with my R8 and I regret it big time..
I just made the cavity looks ugly with almost no improvement in noise

I can’t deny that mine was poorly done by a careless tech here in Egypt... but still I don’t recommend it
 

Freddy G

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What can i do if I’m using the vintage braided 50’s style wiring anything? So you think I should leave the cavites un shielded and just try to do something from the switch to jack run?
That is self-shielded.
^ this. Shielded wire is.....shielded. Really, the only thing in the guitar that is not shielded is the capacitor connection to the tone pots. Even the pots themselves, by their very nature of having a metal can are totally shielded.
 

jvin248

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.

Shielded cable to the jack is very important. You can check yours with a meter.

Pickup covers provide noise reduction. Yea it's trendy to pull covers off for more 'airiness' but that's just noise hitting them. Try recording with and without covers in front of a pc and there is a big difference.

.
 

irocdave12

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Glad I asked...think I’m gonna just put it back together like normal and toss the paint. would have been a messy job anyway I totally dont mind having a reason not to do
 


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