Profiling the back of the neck...

voices

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I had an idea and wondered if anyone has tried or does it this way:

Use a large roundover on each side of the back of the neck to get a symmetrical profile.

What say you?
Screen Shot 2021-04-22 at 11.45.07 AM.png
 

nuance97

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A 1” radius will give you a really good “Gibsonish” profile. It has definitely been done. The headstock angle makes it tricky, and has prevented me from trying it, but it is very common on Fender style necks
 

voices

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I was thinking of maybe stopping short of the headstock and up by the end of the neck ...then doing the rest by hand.
 

voices

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also, if you routed fingerboard side down, you wouldn't have to worry about the headstock angle.
 

pshupe

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The facet method is pretty good but you would need some rasps. Cut the profile to the exact dimension for the thickness you want. Then mark a pencil line on the center, and the facets. Then rasp away the major amounts and feather with rasps and sand paper. Make sure to never hit your center line in the middle so the profile depth always stays.

neck_carve-facets.JPG


Obvioulsy the dimensions are different for different profiles. You could just do half way and then use a profile gauge or template to finish.

Cheers Peter.
 

voices

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The facet method is pretty good but you would need some rasps. Cut the profile to the exact dimension for the thickness you want. Then mark a pencil line on the center, and the facets. Then rasp away the major amounts and feather with rasps and sand paper. Make sure to never hit your center line in the middle so the profile depth always stays.

View attachment 533027

Obvioulsy the dimensions are different for different profiles. You could just do half way and then use a profile gauge or template to finish.

Cheers Peter.
That is the way I've been doing it but my results aren't what I want. my necks seem to be all over the place and not uniform. Remember I told you about that 70's V i have with the perfect neck? Its almost a half circle at the fist fret. Thats what I'm looking to do.
 

voices

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There are always these... but you'll need to either trim away some material ahead of routing, or you'll need a very heavy duty router in a table or a shaper. An overhead pin router could potentially work as well... certainly handheld routing would be out of the question.

this was the one i was lookin at. im wanting to do almost a half circle profile and adjust from there. I'm not sure if I'm explaining it right.

 

nuance97

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also, if you routed fingerboard side down, you wouldn't have to worry about the headstock angle.
Yes that is the only way it’s possible on a Gibson style neck, but if you’re like me (no pin router) you have to build a floating jig which is easy enough, however the size of the router base itself makes getting close to the headstock problematic. It may not be as difficult as I imagine though...I’ve never gotten past the “thinking about it” phase.
 

nuance97

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This is a good video on it...with a pin router
 

voices

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Yes that is the only way it’s possible on a Gibson style neck, but if you’re like me (no pin router) you have to build a floating jig which is easy enough, however the size of the router base itself makes getting close to the headstock problematic. It may not be as difficult as I imagine though...I’ve never gotten past the “thinking about it” phase.
couldn't I just do it on a router table using the bearing as my guide?
 

nuance97

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couldn't I just do it on a router table using the bearing as my guide?
Not any way I can conceive of...a Fender style neck absolutely, but not a neck with an angled headstock. Unless I’m missing something
 

cmjohnson

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I actually have used a cutter like that for profiling a neck but it's only good for rough profiling. It'll save you some time but it's not going to keep you from putting a lot of hand work into making a neck shape you'll really like.

I'll use that cutter again for future necks. It is a good labor saver, but is not a labor eliminator by any stretch of the imagination.

I use mine in my milling machine. I have to, because its shank diameter is one inch and that won't fit in any router I ever even heard of.
 

danigalapago

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Wow! I bought this 1” router bit last night for this purpose.
you’ll need a pin router in order to profile a neck with an angled headstock.

 

pavel

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Not owning a pin router, I've had pretty good results in the past with the Bill Scheltema neck contouring jig. It looks like there are a lot of different variations/improvements out there including this:


which looks pretty fancy. (Disclaimer: didn't try this version myself).

I have gone back to shaping necks with a nice rasp because to me it's one of the most enjoyable parts of building.
 

cmjohnson

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Most of my neck shaping has always been done with a 6x48" belt sander. After that, random orbital sander and a progression of grits. I do a little work up in the throat and the heel with my oscillating spindle sander.

Using carve templates, a straightedge, and a set of dial calipers I can nail my desired neck profiles rather well.
 

voices

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Not any way I can conceive of...a Fender style neck absolutely, but not a neck with an angled headstock. Unless I’m missing something
like this? but with a bigger bit
IMG_2254.jpg
 

voices

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Most of my neck shaping has always been done with a 6x48" belt sander. After that, random orbital sander and a progression of grits. I do a little work up in the throat and the heel with my oscillating spindle sander.

Using carve templates, a straightedge, and a set of dial calipers I can nail my desired neck profiles rather well.
@ Gibson, we had a huge belt sander to do the back profiles. It was the length of the neck so it would trim it all in one operation. I don't have a belt sander (yet) but eventually want to do it in a similar way. For now, I'm just investigating the possibility of using the router with the bit I mentioned.
 

pshupe

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@ Gibson, we had a huge belt sander to do the back profiles. It was the length of the neck so it would trim it all in one operation. I don't have a belt sander (yet) but eventually want to do it in a similar way. For now, I'm just investigating the possibility of using the router with the bit I mentioned.
That's called a dead head sander and it is probably the quickest way to shape a neck, not to mention vintage correct.
Capture.JPG


If you incorporate stops for the different profiles and necks. It would be very very useful.

Cheers Peter.
 

nuance97

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like this? but with a bigger bit
View attachment 533272
Sure, but how can you do that from a router table? The angle of your headstock makes that impossible does it not? It won’t sit flat like a Fender style neck. You’d have to mount the router overhead
 


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