Power supplies

E.T.

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I only just realised I could power the three pedals I have and the fourth on pre-order with one wall wart, which I believe officially makes me a moron. Here is pedal #4:

1620393959988.png
 

BRMarshall

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We all have our moments. You have a wide variety of options and prices. I’m a home electric player - using a Truetone 1spot ps and 8 plug daisy chain. Everything is plugged into a Furman 6-plug along with amps. My home was built in 95, so reasonably modern wiring. I have no noticeable noise and there is more than enough juice for the 6 pedals on my modest board - I tested each pedal.

For home this has been a quiet and economical solution. If you plan to playing out, you may want something more sophisticated.
 

Les Paulverizer

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I’m a working guitarist and even though I’m not big time into effects I still need a few, to colour the music here and there, hence I have 2 pedalboards: a bigger one with 5 pedals and a smaller one with just a couple (which is my favourite...!) Apart from the effect pedals each of these ‘boards start with a buffer, a TC Electronic Bona Fide, so I don’t have to worry about the length of the cables.
The bigger one is powered by a Voodoo Lab Power 2 Plus while the small one by a little, and cheaper, Carl Martin power supply, and I couldn’t be happier; both extremely reliable and, due to all the inputs being isolated, no noise whatsoever!
I did try a cheapo power supply and the noise was just unbearable...!
The Voodoo Lab is a little expensive but Carl Martin, and also T. Rex, make more affordable stuff but quality wise they’re second to none.
In my personal experience, almost anything coming out of Northern Europe is a guarantee...
 
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E.T.

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The PS I have is the standard Electro-Harmonix one I bought to power an LPB-1 (my "secret sauce")- it's a 200mA supply, and though it's the lowest current output of the three I have it seems like it's built sturdiest. The four pedals it will be powering are, in order, a CBM95 mini wah (<1mA), the flanger (40mA), a Boss RC-3 (70mA) and the LPB-1 (1mA) so in total only 112mA is going to be drawn. I doubt I'll be going on a pedal odyssey, but if needs be I think that means have 88mA left on the EH adapter as well as north of an amp total from the other two wall-warts from the wah and the RC-3, both of which I got on the assumption that each pedal would require its own adapter to power it separately..
 

BRMarshall

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Sounds like you’re good. Agree with Les Paulverizer that a good quality power supply is worth the investment, especially if you have plans for play out. I’m an old guy and don’t play at band volumes so my economical system works but it may be different, noise wise, if cranked. The price of 9v batteries seems high to me, and buying several at a time can really add up quick.

I was very surprised how low my 3 od pedals tested. The reverb and chorus pedals drew substantially more, but not crazy.
 

Brek

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Sounds like you’re good. Agree with Les Paulverizer that a good quality power supply is worth the investment, especially if you have plans for play out. I’m an old guy and don’t play at band volumes so my economical system works but it may be different, noise wise, if cranked. The price of 9v batteries seems high to me, and buying several at a time can really add up quick.

I was very surprised how low my 3 od pedals tested. The reverb and chorus pedals drew substantially more, but not crazy.
Indeed, which is why i have plumped for a usb powerpack solution. Thanks to some help from a MLP member i have two systems one is 9v and supplies 9v pedals via daisy chain. The other one is supplied from 20000maH battery, 2 x 2.4A @ 5V stepped upto 12v @ 2A which powers a thomann powerplant, which has 3x9V and 2x9/12/18V. Clean reliable power which I recharge via solar. Cost was £25 for battery and £1.50 for the step up module. I bought a usb power lead (not data) and cut one end off and soldered to transformer and did same with a pedal cable.

P.S. I have read that non switching PS are better? Although I am struggling to find ones that are not switching. Anyone have an opinion on this?
 

ARandall

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Especially if you play crappily wired places, a PS with lifted/independent grounds is a must. I've just reorganised a pedalboard , and now 2 pedals mustn't like being daiseychained (even if both are off). There's a warbling buzz whenever I'm plugged in. I'll have to re-route the power supply leads so those 2 at least have separate connections.
 

E.T.

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Indeed, which is why i have plumped for a usb powerpack solution. Thanks to some help from a MLP member i have two systems one is 9v and supplies 9v pedals via daisy chain. The other one is supplied from 20000maH battery, 2 x 2.4A @ 5V stepped upto 12v @ 2A which powers a thomann powerplant, which has 3x9V and 2x9/12/18V. Clean reliable power which I recharge via solar. Cost was £25 for battery and £1.50 for the step up module. I bought a usb power lead (not data) and cut one end off and soldered to transformer and did same with a pedal cable.

P.S. I have read that non switching PS are better? Although I am struggling to find ones that are not switching. Anyone have an opinion on this?
Because you got me curious, I decided to check my wall-wart and found this nearby, which looks like what you're after:
EHX MOP-D10. I now know that what I think of as a normal power supply (i.e. non-switched) is known as a "linear" one..

From experience using an old-skool light dimmer to produce 120V from 240V whilst testing my amp elsewhere a "chopped" waveform with square edges is bloody noisy in comparison with a sine wave. I'd assume a proper square wave to be a bit less noisy than the wierd sawtooth-esque form produced by the dimmer, but still noisy enough to be a problem.
 


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