Planning with an electric hand planer vs a router sled

Johan79

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I‘ve never done this but I’ve often seen guys using a router sled to flatten and thickness body blanks, etc... I think this method with an electric planer must be better and faster :
Myself I use a number7 hand plane and now a new metabo 13” electric planer, but some may be interested by this method.
 

Ripthorn

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I would never use one of those for a body blank, personally. They will screw things up so fast. A router sled is less prone to mess up the wood. At least that is my experience.
 

ARandall

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Never had luck with planers of any description.
Plus if you don't own a planer but do own a router then it cannot be easier or faster to use a planer
 

Skyjerk

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I‘ve never done this but I’ve often seen guys using a router sled to flatten and thickness body blanks, etc... I think this method with an electric planer must be better and faster :
Myself I use a number7 hand plane and now a new metabo 13” electric planer, but some may be interested by this method.
for thicknessing a body my first choice is my thickness planer,
second choice is a router set up in my jig

I’ve used electric hand planers for things before and I would definitely not use one for this purpose
 

cooljuk

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I don't get those "electric hand planers" and what their primary purpose is. Just use a hand planer and get a better result. If you're in big production work, then you're not using any type of hand planer, right?
 

Ripthorn

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The primary use is for fitting doors, or at least that is what myself and everyone I know uses them for. In the old days they used block planes, so an electric plane makes it much faster to do what is admittedly a relatively rough job.
 

LtDave32

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I don't get those "electric hand planers" and what their primary purpose is. Just use a hand planer and get a better result. If you're in big production work, then you're not using any type of hand planer, right?
They are also known as a "door planer".

Used on construction sites to quickly plane the raw side of doors. Just that little 1.5 inch strip.

If you're on a floor of a high-rise condo building, you've got like 200 or more doors on one floor. If they aren't all pre-hung, you might have a pretty big task ahead of you. Electric door planers can make shorter work of it.
 

Brek

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I flattened one side of a body with an electric planer, never again, it didn’t go wrong, just took bloody ages. I’ll be making a router slide for the next time. Just about to do a finishing of the shape on two blanks I let sit a while after doing rough outline cuts, they not moved in any obvious way so going to cut to size with a bit over to allow for sanding.
 

fatdaddypreacher

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that might work well for getting wonky jaw out of a slab....that is to say if it has a little bow or twist in it. get the one side reasonably flat, then turn that face down and run it through the planer and keep flipping it to end up with a flat parralel slab. but if it's that bad, probably shouldn't be used for a guitar, and you could also do the same thing with a router jig. not a fan of the electric hand planes either. had one at the shop i worked at 13 years and don't think we ever used it.
 


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