Pitch shifter pedal vs. real detuning

Mockbel

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Hi brothers

Different tuning is one of the major pain points I have. most of my guitar purchases are driven by the need for same specs but to keep in different tuning.

In the past, i tried using the pitch shift effect on my Boss GT-8 to play different tunings with same guitar, however, it didn't sound right.

Now i shifted to pedals, so I started to think again of a Pitch Shifter pedal. Would it really sound as natural as real detuning? If it worth trying, which pedal would you recommend? I need something simple, I don't need a full featured harmonist pedal.. just a pitch shifter

Thanks
 
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Mockbel

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Have you thought about getting a Variax guitar?
Got this recommendation a couple of times but.. no... I want to still play a real guitar sounding from real pickups.. not a fully processed sound

I watched many demos for Variax and they sound pretty good and some models look cool too but I can't imagine it.. exactly like real amp and pedals vs. a helix or something... I appreciate the Helix so much and if I go digital it would be my choice but till the moment, I prefer real amp and pedals
 

Burst Boy

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I have a Mooer Pitch Box and Digitech Whammy. When in detune settings they both change the pitch of the signal and mix it back with the original signal to give a chorus like effect. This is not like down or up tuning individual guitar strings. I'm certain that most detune functions for most pitch shift pedals do the same.

Standard pitch shifting (without mixing it back into the original signal) using a pedal is sort off like detuning a guitar string but doesn't sound natural (at least to my ear, sounds synthetic). I'm not sure if there are pitch shifting pedals available that sound as natural as changing the pitch of a string but if there is they'd be rather expensive due to the processing power required. Could be wrong though. If it were me I'd probably have a number of guitars set up for different tunings.
 

Mockbel

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I have a Mooer Pitch Box and Digitech Whammy. When in detune settings they both change the pitch of the signal and mix it back with the original signal to give a chorus like effect. This is not like down or up tuning individual guitar strings. I'm certain that most detune functions for most pitch shift pedals do the same.

Standard pitch shifting (without mixing it back into the original signal) using a pedal is sort off like detuning a guitar string but doesn't sound natural (at least to my ear, sounds synthetic). I'm not sure if there are pitch shifting pedals available that sound as natural as changing the pitch of a string but if there is they'd be rather expensive due to the processing power required. Could be wrong though. If it were me I'd probably have a number of guitars set up for different tunings.
The only pedal that I found specifically designed for that is the Digitech Drop.. around $180
Other pitch shift pedals should be able to do it by making the volume blend 100% effect volume vs 0% dry volume..
 

Burst Boy

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The only pedal that I found specifically designed for that is the Digitech Drop.. around $180
Other pitch shift pedals should be able to do it by making the volume blend 100% effect volume vs 0% dry volume..
The Mooer Pitch Box is an example of pitch shifting that does it without shifting from dry to 100% pitch shifted. I think its a clone of one of the Boss pedals. I wouldn't recommend it though 'cause it can be glitchy, especially the bigger the shift split, not natural at all. It does have it's charms though used purely as an effect.

The Drop seems good for down tuning and generally gets good reviews from what I've read. May be a good choice if 'Down' is what you want:slash:

This thread got me interested so I did some reading last night. The Digitech Ricochet is interesting, does the whammy thing without a treadle but seems that it can be adjusted to set pitch intervals. It also has the choice of old school glitchy or better tracking, zero glitch, new school. Still sounds like a Whammy though, so not natural. Wouldn't mind one to experiment with but I already have a Whammy V.
 

tzd

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Variax with alternate tuning sounds more natural than any pedal would get you. Digitech Drop is the closest choice if you want a pedal.
 

dspelman

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Got this recommendation a couple of times but.. no... I want to still play a real guitar sounding from real pickups.. not a fully processed sound

I watched many demos for Variax and they sound pretty good and some models look cool too but I can't imagine it.. exactly like real amp and pedals vs. a helix or something... I appreciate the Helix so much and if I go digital it would be my choice but till the moment, I prefer real amp and pedals
Uh...piezos are real pickups. Worth noting that you can toe-dip the Variax firmware, because there are real James Tyler pickups (magnetics, what you're used to) on most of the Variax guitars and you can avoid the Variax stuff until you're ready to change the tuning. Fact is, Variax has even modeled my JTV-89F pickups, so it's pretty easy to change from magnetic pickups to modeled pickups.

So it's a real guitar AND a modeled guitar.

Did you know that when Mutt Lange was selecting a tele sound to send out with Shania Twain on her debut tour, he listened to a bunch of the guitar player's teles and wasn't quite happy with them. Until, as a last resort, the guitar player pulled out his Variax. And that's the "tele" that went on tour.
Oh, and Edge of U2 has been using a pair of Variax Acoustic 700s on tour for years. They look like a thinline hollowbody sound hole guitar. Except that they're actually sold mahogany bodied. Oh, and the Doobie Brothers have used that yellow Variax and its acoustic guitar models onstage for a long time.

Oh, and if you actually get a Helix, the Variax can use a VDI cable (think ethernet, but "hardened" at the ends) to connect to it. Your P90 and other single coil sounds will be noiseless. No capacitance issues. The magnetic pickups run through the VDI cable as well. And you can actually assign the control of any parameter to the volume and tone knobs on the Variax. And you can store alternate tunings, the guitar modeled, amps, cabs and FX in a single user preset and switch the whole thing at once with a single stomp. And with the Helix, there are four (count 'em FOUR) FX loops that can be routed into your rig at any point. Oh, and there are a couple of amp switches built in as well. Oh, and the Helix powers the Variax (it ordinarily uses onboard batteries) as well. And it's MIDI, so you can actually send MIDI signals to change the lights with a stomp as well. Because doesn't everyone?

So you can still have a real guitar sounding through real pedals and a real amp AND you can have instant downtuning. What's not to love?
 

Mockbel

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So you can still have a real guitar sounding through real pedals and a real amp AND you can have instant downtuning. What's not to love?
I just can’t swallow it !

May be when i overcome the Tube Amp vs Modeling thing, i start thinking of Real Guitar vs Variax

For now, I believe I should start digging for a Digitech Drop
 

northernguitarguy

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My main problem with the G Force is it's made of plastic. It's on a Gibson FFS. It should be built like a Seiko, but instead, it's a Casio. I can't see them lasting longer than 10 years during heavy use, if that. Meanwhile, I had a Yamaha SG from 1977, played to death, and the tuners worked like a champ.
 

Jymbopalyse

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My main problem with the G Force is it's made of plastic. It's on a Gibson FFS. It should be built like a Seiko, but instead, it's a Casio. I can't see them lasting longer than 10 years during heavy use, if that. Meanwhile, I had a Yamaha SG from 1977, played to death, and the tuners worked like a champ.
This !!!

And I bet that lasting 5 years will be a stretch.
 

pillbug

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Another vote for the Digitech Drop here. I hate detuning/retuning my guitars so I use the Drop to play Kiss, Sabbath, early '70s Hawkwind etc.
It sounds good enough for home use... if I were gigging and getting paid for it I'd just have extra guitars in different tunings. And a roadie to hand them off to me.
But for $150 or so, the Drop gets the job done.
 

Mockbel

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Another vote for the Digitech Drop here. I hate detuning/retuning my guitars so I use the Drop to play Kiss, Sabbath, early '70s Hawkwind etc.
It sounds good enough for home use... if I were gigging and getting paid for it I'd just have extra guitars in different tunings. And a roadie to hand them off to me.
But for $150 or so, the Drop gets the job done.
Got a couple of recommendations on Morpheus Droptune.. first time to know about it.. it is larger in size, cheaper, shift the tuning up and down.. anyone heard about it??
 

Chadd

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Got a couple of recommendations on Morpheus Droptune.. first time to know about it.. it is larger in size, cheaper, shift the tuning up and down.. anyone heard about it??
I went to an audition with the other guitarist using one. They were obviously used to it, jumping from one tuning to the next with a tap or two and expecting me to be right there with the changes without any notice.
 
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Mockbel

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I went to an audition with the other guitarist using one. They were obviously used to it, jumping from one tuning to the next with a tap or two and expecting me to be right there with the changes without any notice.
That’s a tough audition!
 

Deus Vult

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The only pedal that I found specifically designed for that is the Digitech Drop.. around $180
Other pitch shift pedals should be able to do it by making the volume blend 100% effect volume vs 0% dry volume..
I play in a band that does songs in D, Eb and E tunings. The Drop pedal works perfectly.

Yes it does alter the tone (and not for the better imho) but it’s waaaaaaaay better than bringing multiple guitars or having to tune between songs.

It works so well my bass player bought
One. And my singer bought one for personal use at his house.
 




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