Phaez Amps [merged]

Phaez sub forum? Yes or no?

  • Yes

    Votes: 53 54.6%
  • No

    Votes: 44 45.4%

  • Total voters
    97

V2

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this is my 18w phaze jericho. I have been considering getting it modded for more gain. I like the amp, just not enough gain for me even with the built in boost.
Sweet-looking cab!
Can we hear the amp?
 

rclausen

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this is my 18w phaze jericho. I have been considering getting it modded for more gain. I like the amp, just not enough gain for me even with the built in boost.

Nice that's my old amp. I had the head cab custom made by an old forum member, Alexb. It was inspired by the offset Marshall JTM. Sounds great in you clips
 

stringtheory

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As far as any BS about having the wiring as an art form at 90 degrees tucked away most beautiful and pretty as a picture meaning a better amp is concerned consider the article below as a description from those who know that being neat isn't a tone requisite. Just a good circuit is what you need. That's why Phaez amps can't be called out for unreliably or wiring issues and are in fact some of the best made amps period.



The Makers:
On one hand, an extremely tidy wiring job might imply conscientious work in general, and that in itself is a good thing. But pure neatness in and of itself does not a toneful amp make.


“A lot of people love to see a chassis layout with wires that are real straight, and then a 90-degree bend, and then straight,” says Mark Bartel. “We used to call that ‘Manhattan wiring’ in the old days [in reference to the street grid]. I think that looks beautiful, but in two ways it is not ideal, really. From an engineering perspective, it doesn’t necessarily give you the best layout with the lowest parasitics [where noise from power lines stray into signal lines]. Just practically, it doesn’t always result in the best sounding layout. I got to talking to Bill Krinard from Two-Rock about this a lot, where we agree that sometimes the messy layouts just sound better. Of course, you can’t just make a random messy layout and expect it to sound better. The point is that wiring does have an effect on the sound, and just making it look neat on paper isn’t going to give you the best sound.”

Plenty more can be said on the subject, so maybe some of the other myths will make fodder for another installment. Meanwhile, let’s close on a piece of philosophy from Steven Fryette, which I feel addresses the subject in general very well:

“In every discipline there are hold-outs that have these old wives’ tales that they want to apply to whatever is going on. It’s universal that when you have a comfort level with a particular thing, and then you’re confronted with the new way to do that thing, there’s either just full-bore, dive in, ‘I’m all for it,’ or there’s absolute resistance to technological development. When that resistance occurs, that’s when these unsubstantiated statements about certain things get applied where they don’t apply.”
 
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jojo

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As far as any BS about having the wiring as an art form at 90 degrees tucked away most beautiful and pretty as a picture meaning a better amp is concerned consider the article below as a description from those who know that being neat isn't a tone requisite. Just a good circuit is what you need. That's why Phaez amps are as good as any made.



The Makers:
On one hand, an extremely tidy wiring job might imply conscientious work in general, and that in itself is a good thing. But pure neatness in and of itself does not a toneful amp make.


“A lot of people love to see a chassis layout with wires that are real straight, and then a 90-degree bend, and then straight,” says Mark Bartel. “We used to call that ‘Manhattan wiring’ in the old days [in reference to the street grid]. I think that looks beautiful, but in two ways it is not ideal, really. From an engineering perspective, it doesn’t necessarily give you the best layout with the lowest parasitics [where noise from power lines stray into signal lines]. Just practically, it doesn’t always result in the best sounding layout. I got to talking to Bill Krinard from Two-Rock about this a lot, where we agree that sometimes the messy layouts just sound better. Of course, you can’t just make a random messy layout and expect it to sound better. The point is that wiring does have an effect on the sound, and just making it look neat on paper isn’t going to give you the best sound.”

Plenty more can be said on the subject, so maybe some of the other myths will make fodder for another installment. Meanwhile, let’s close on a piece of philosophy from Steven Fryette, which I feel addresses the subject in general very well:

“In every discipline there are hold-outs that have these old wives’ tales that they want to apply to whatever is going on. It’s universal that when you have a comfort level with a particular thing, and then you’re confronted with the new way to do that thing, there’s either just full-bore, dive in, ‘I’m all for it,’ or there’s absolute resistance to technological development. When that resistance occurs, that’s when these unsubstantiated statements about certain things get applied where they don’t apply.”
Lol
 

jojo

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Glad you agree. Had to challenge all those who don't like pretty wiring that it's a non issue for a great amp.
I agree, that it's possible for an amp that looks like a rat's nest inside to sound good. I've seen too many that sound killer and do not look like that though. I would never buy a custom amp that looked like some blind first time amp builder built it though. To each his own. Sure would make it easier to service down the road if it was done neatly too.
 

stringtheory

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I agree, that it's possible for an amp that looks like a rat's nest inside to sound good. I've seen too many that sound killer and do not look like that though. I would never buy a custom amp that looked like some blind first time amp builder built it though. To each his own. Sure would make it easier to service down the road if it was done neatly too.
Yea his wiring is rather simple to follow now and sound stellar especially if you pay a little more for top shelf parts which is an option it makes it a amp that holds its own against all.
 

freebird2

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Just picked up an older Phaez with a clean and an overdrive channel, with no channel switching. Just one guitar input and separate volumes. Hoping someone can help me understand the functionality of Randy's older effects loop that features a single return jack but two send jacks (one labeled "OD send" and the other labeled "clean send"). Apparently I can use this for channel switching? I need some help understanding how I would do that with an a/b box.
 
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