Pay as you go driving!

Sct13

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That is a LOOOONG way off.
"Connected Vehicle" is a huge buzz-term in the industry.
The problem is, we aren't even at the stage of VHS/Betamax yet.
There are no solid definitions, there are no legislated standards. EVERYTHING is proprietary.
And infrastructure upgrades to support it are not cheap.

A traffic signal controller costs about $3000 for the CPU and local software. That is JUST the processor that controls the lights locally and does not include ancillary hardware.
That has to be connected to the communications hub via fiber or wireless.
The server running at the traffic management center needs to be running software that supports the system deployed in the field.
These systems are generally not compatible from city to city.
The city I work for, neighboring Los Angeles, is one of the more technically advanced cities in the area, and we are still running on a server that was configured in 2013 using software that was ported from a 1990s design.
The majority of our 200 intersections are still running 8-bit processors.
We would be looking at an investment of over 2 million just to upgrade our hardware and software to the current "latest and greatest". Fortunately, we already have gigabit fiber communication to all of our controllers.
An agency as large as Los Angeles with over 4,000 intersections would be looking at billions for a similar upgrade.

Right now, the closest thing to "connected vehicle" that exists... and this is on the newest of central systems... is the driver's app can be given a 4-second countdown to when they will get a green light when they are waiting at a red.
The last 3 times a sales rep came to our TMC to demonstrate the system, none of the systems in operation that he was able to log in to were more than 10% functional, and the intersections that were reporting data were inconsistent.
There is currently nothing in development (for private vehicles) beyond the stage of "it would be nice if we could" beyond that.

Yes they are....GM is building a huge city scape to test this at an airport near me.....the old B-24 plant at willow Run Airport / that was turned into a car production plant and was just recently razed for this this project....they are going to work out the bugs....they are looking into the feasibility of completely changing the infrastructure of a cityscape over time.....It wont / Cant be one big upgrade......It will be in phases
 

TheX

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Sun's Enterprise Servers used to ship fully outfitted with CPU's, memory, etc. You had to pay for the license to enable them. They claimed it was easier than keeping matching CPU's in stock for every server sold.
 

JTM45

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No chance in double dicked hell I’ll pay for a vehicle subscription where I have to pay for high beams or anything else
 

CB91710

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Yes they are....GM is building a huge city scape to test this at an airport near me.....the old B-24 plant at willow Run Airport / that was turned into a car production plant and was just recently razed for this this project....they are going to work out the bugs....they are looking into the feasibility of completely changing the infrastructure of a cityscape over time.....It wont / Cant be one big upgrade......It will be in phases
And it's all proprietary... it belongs to GM.
They (and other companies) have built "fantasy" systems for decades. There was a "test" 10 or so years ago using self-driving cars on the HOT lanes north of San Diego... the cars tracked sensors mounted in the pavement.

Proprietary is a BIG problem for government contracts. Purchasing does not like sole source. Engineers don't like to be forced into a particular company's product.
We have multiple standards for traffic signal equipment, and the new ATC standard *COULD* be used to integrate many of these systems... but then the funding is not available for deployment. Budgets are already limited, and to transition from our 8-bit systems to the ATC platform requires implementation on an arterial-by-arterial basis... minimum 20 locations.
Current systems are the Caltrans/New York spec 332 cabinet using the 170E and 2070 controller, the NEMA spec, which is not used by many state agencies... Then the next generation of the 332 spec in the 2070ATC platform... which is similar to, but not fully compatible with the NEMA TS2 spec that was developed in the 90s.

Like I said... it's a LONG ways off, and there are no national standards directing the development. We have 500 companies all working on their box of magic beans, but all of the boxes do something different.
 
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ehb

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And it's all proprietary... it belongs to GM.
They (and other companies) have built "fantasy" systems for decades. There was a "test" 10 or so years ago using self-driving cars on the HOT lanes north of San Diego... the cars tracked sensors mounted in the pavement.

Proprietary is a BIG problem for government contracts. Purchasing does not like sole source. Engineers don't like to be forced into a particular company's product.
We have multiple standards for traffic signal equipment, and the new ATC standard *COULD* be used to integrate many of these systems... but then the funding is not available for deployment. Budgets are already limited, and to transition from our 8-bit systems to the ATC platform requires implementation on an arterial-by-arterial basis... minimum 20 locations.
Current systems are the Caltrans/New York spec 332 cabinet using the 170E and 2070 controller, the NEMA spec, which is not used by many state agencies... Then the next generation of the 332 spec in the 2070ATC platform... which is similar to, but not fully compatible with the NEMA TS2 spec that was developed in the 90s.

Like I said... it's a LONG ways off, and there are no national standards directing the development. We have 500 companies all working on their box of magic beans, but all of the boxes do something different.
The Gummit can't run a one car parade without half being lost, late as hell, and costing multiples of the worst-case-scenario estimate... and folks expect systems to communicate. Hell, you can't get the same answer twice in a row from Gummit folks working in the same room...
 

Bobby Mahogany

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Are we entering an era where subscription driving will be the norm? I was amazed reading about one chap who was driving his BMW 530e at night & wanted to try the 'High beam assist' when he pressed the button he was presented with a message on screen asking for £179 to activate it via QR code on a mobile phone :wow:



Is there a "Fuck you, no!" reply available?
:shock:
 

Zungle

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So....


Hasn't pay as you go been a thing from pretty much day 1 ......???

Pretty sure most cars use a thing called gas......

Then they developed a few other pay as you go items called license,registration and tabs.....

Then at federal level they added a another pay as you item...... gas tax......

The states hey we need some of that action and added more "gas tax"

We're paying a lot to go now.....
 

CB91710

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The Gummit can't run a one car parade without half being lost, late as hell, and costing multiples of the worst-case-scenario estimate... and folks expect systems to communicate. Hell, you can't get the same answer twice in a row from Gummit folks working in the same room...
No shit.

Metrolink put in a new train station.
All kinds of cool bike lanes and bus turnouts.

While this was being built, a major redevelopment was going on the other side of the street.
A redevelopment that includes an Amazon distribution center.
The main street that feeds the development will need to have the 1-way stop upgraded to a full traffic signal, and an additional crosswalk is needed from the train station to the development.

The dumies ignored the new development and slapped a bus pad directly across from the street, requiring the crosswalk to be at a 45 degree angle... now we have a pedestrian safety issue with drivers turning right across the crosswalk :facepalm:
"Nope... we can't do that without going to exclusive ped and no-right-on-red... that's not going to work and will cause significant delays"
"Oh... well, can we move the crosswalk?"
"So, add a new intersection AND a signalized crosswalk at the midpoint upstream of the next intersection that is only 600ft away? OK, where do you suggest we put that crosswalk, given that there are two minor exits to the complex AND a commercial driveway right in the middle... and even if we DID go between, they're across from two other bus pads so we'd have the same problem!"

"Oh, sorry... we didn't take the new development into account"

After 3 weeks, they drew up revised plans that move the western bus pad 150ft so we can put the crosswalk at 90 degrees to traffic. :facepalm:

I laugh at conspiracy nutjobs... there's not enough intelligence or communication among government employees to pull off half the shit they talk about.
It's always been bad, but it's steadily grown worse as academia without experience has taken over engineering teams.
 

ArchEtech

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I’m
Glad my Nissan GTR has 2009 technology. Fun as holy hell too.
 

Rocco Crocco

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Putting remote start on a subscription service is a dick move.
 

CB91710

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Putting remote start on a subscription service is a dick move.
I think the remote start from the key fob remains functional.
The remote start from your phone app is subscription, and honestly... it's using a cellular device in the car. Than entails a monthly charge to the provider.
OnStar requires a subscription for anything more than the most basic safety functions (airbag goes off, Onstar calls 911)
 


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