Pay as you go driving!

lancpudn

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IF they actually lowered the price of the 'base' vehicle, and thus let the customer customize their added extras and features, a-la-carte, then that would be a good thing. Why pay for a big feature package or trim level, if you don't want all of it.?

BUT

I am willing to bet that is NOT what is happening. Likely paying much more to get the same as you used to. The above a la carte approach would make more sense for budget, mid range priced cars. But, seeing it on luxury cars, points to a money grab.

From 2026 VW will be launching project 'Trinity' whereas the car you buy wouldn’t come in variants: The hardware for all features on offer would be built into every car, but would remain latent until you activate /subscribe to the software that runs it.
All these new VW Trinity BEV's will be networked & connected to one another sharing data and to all street furniture/traffic lights/road junctions etc.

I wonder how long it will be before they run adverts on those big infotainment screens & then ask you if you want to go ad free by paying 'X' amount of money to shut them off. :eek2:
 

cybermgk

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From 2026 VW will be launching project 'Trinity' whereas the car you buy wouldn’t come in variants: The hardware for all features on offer would be built into every car, but would remain latent until you activate /subscribe to the software that runs it.
All these new VW Trinity BEV's will be networked & connected to one another sharing data and to all street furniture/traffic lights/road junctions etc.

I wonder how long it will be before they run adverts on those big infotainment screens & then ask you if you want to go ad free by paying 'X' amount of money to shut them off. :eek2:
Well, on the other hand, I see a whole new area for making money. I.E. people paying less to have hacks for this
 

Olds442

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as long as there is tech, there will be hackers. Electrified Garage hacked the model 3 upgrade codes last year or late 2019?

we used to get "performance chips" back in the 90s for mustangs and whatnot, it's the same thing. then it was a hardware hack for a performance upgrade. now features and everything else are software hack-able.
 

TXOldRedRocker

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Everybody's out to nickel and dime us to death. How many more bills do most people have now? Cell, streaming, toll tags, new forms of government permits, etc., etc., etc.
Never wanted a German car before, and doesn't look like that's changing.
 

lancpudn

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Car manufacturers are even reducing the optional features on ICE vehicles at present because every new car registered in Europe has a unique WLTP value added to it in the smallest detail, i.e. they're now not manufacturing cars with sunroofs because it will add to the carbon footprint of the vehicle & add approximately 2g/km to the cars emission levels :eek2: Likewise reducing the size of the wheels to reduce friction & rolling resistance. :wow:https://www.fleetnews.co.uk/news/manufacturer-news/2021/04/06/car-makers-move-away-from-optional-extras-and-large-wheels-to-simplify-wltp-values
 

CB91710

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It’s a feature option, that would normally be paid for when car was ordered? From what I read into it anyway. It’s not high beam, but high beam assist, it turns it off when oncoming cars appear.
Newer Toyotas have connected features that require an annual subscription.
The cars work just fine without it, but you need the subscription for functions such as the dynamic navigation (if you don't use Waze or Google Maps through Android Auto), and some of the convenience functions, such as remote start and checking lock status.
The cars have a built-in cellular module that connects to whatever provider has the contract which enables your phone app to communicate with the vehicle when you are out of BT range.


The vehicles are sold with the features enabled on a free-trial basis, and you need to subscribe to maintain the feature.
 

CB91710

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The sensors that detect oncoming headlights to control the high beams are already in the car, so you can be sure that you paid for them already. The fee is to enable them.
Yep.
My 2003 Tundra and wife's 2004 Rav4 had all of the electronics and functions for the RS3200 (or RS3000?) security system already in the ECU.
All that was needed to activate everything except glass-breakage was to plug in a jumper that was disconnected and taped up under the dash, and go through the door lock button/ignition switch/brake pedal song and dance to program it.
The only thing I needed to actually buy was the glass breakage sensor microphone.
The 2015 Rav4 I did have to buy an actual add-on module and connect it to the ECU.
 

Uncle Vinnie

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All these new VW Trinity BEV's will be networked & connected to one another sharing data and to all street furniture/traffic lights/road junctions etc.
... real time speed info to the local gendarmes so you can receive your speeding citations by mail ... or have it automatically deducted from your bank account.

What defeats this high-tech crap? Low tech. I'll ride my Black Diamond bike to and fro before yielding to this nonsense.
 

CB91710

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All these new VW Trinity BEV's will be networked & connected to one another sharing data and to all street furniture/traffic lights/road junctions etc.
That is a LOOOONG way off.
"Connected Vehicle" is a huge buzz-term in the industry.
The problem is, we aren't even at the stage of VHS/Betamax yet.
There are no solid definitions, there are no legislated standards. EVERYTHING is proprietary.
And infrastructure upgrades to support it are not cheap.

A traffic signal controller costs about $3000 for the CPU and local software. That is JUST the processor that controls the lights locally and does not include ancillary hardware.
That has to be connected to the communications hub via fiber or wireless.
The server running at the traffic management center needs to be running software that supports the system deployed in the field.
These systems are generally not compatible from city to city.
The city I work for, neighboring Los Angeles, is one of the more technically advanced cities in the area, and we are still running on a server that was configured in 2013 using software that was ported from a 1990s design.
The majority of our 200 intersections are still running 8-bit processors.
We would be looking at an investment of over 2 million just to upgrade our hardware and software to the current "latest and greatest". Fortunately, we already have gigabit fiber communication to all of our controllers.
An agency as large as Los Angeles with over 4,000 intersections would be looking at billions for a similar upgrade.

Right now, the closest thing to "connected vehicle" that exists... and this is on the newest of central systems... is the driver's app can be given a 4-second countdown to when they will get a green light when they are waiting at a red.
The last 3 times a sales rep came to our TMC to demonstrate the system, none of the systems in operation that he was able to log in to were more than 10% functional, and the intersections that were reporting data were inconsistent.
There is currently nothing in development (for private vehicles) beyond the stage of "it would be nice if we could" beyond that.
 

lancpudn

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... real time speed info to the local gendarmes so you can receive your speeding citations by mail ... or have it automatically deducted from your bank account.

What defeats this high-tech crap? Low tech. I'll ride my Black Diamond bike to and fro before yielding to this nonsense.

The car wont let you speed in the new world order :thumb: It wont let you, I can see a time in my life time & I'm an old fart whereas your old car wont be allowed to use certain stretches of tarmac especially congested commute routes like they do in a Manchester city centre just down the road from me, Only certain vehicles with 5g networked connection & the correct software will be able to enter. :eek:Here's a view of things to come. :eek:

 

lancpudn

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That is a LOOOONG way off.
"Connected Vehicle" is a huge buzz-term in the industry.
The problem is, we aren't even at the stage of VHS/Betamax yet.
There are no solid definitions, there are no legislated standards. EVERYTHING is proprietary.
And infrastructure upgrades to support it are not cheap.

A traffic signal controller costs about $3000 for the CPU and local software. That is JUST the processor that controls the lights locally and does not include ancillary hardware.
That has to be connected to the communications hub via fiber or wireless.
The server running at the traffic management center needs to be running software that supports the system deployed in the field.
These systems are generally not compatible from city to city.
The city I work for, neighboring Los Angeles, is one of the more technically advanced cities in the area, and we are still running on a server that was configured in 2013 using software that was ported from a 1990s design.
The majority of our 200 intersections are still running 8-bit processors.
We would be looking at an investment of over 2 million just to upgrade our hardware and software to the current "latest and greatest". Fortunately, we already have gigabit fiber communication to all of our controllers.
An agency as large as Los Angeles with over 4,000 intersections would be looking at billions for a similar upgrade.

Right now, the closest thing to "connected vehicle" that exists... and this is on the newest of central systems... is the driver's app can be given a 4-second countdown to when they will get a green light when they are waiting at a red.
The last 3 times a sales rep came to our TMC to demonstrate the system, none of the systems in operation that he was able to log in to were more than 10% functional, and the intersections that were reporting data were inconsistent.
There is currently nothing in development (for private vehicles) beyond the stage of "it would be nice if we could" beyond that.

They've had V2X & more recently 5G BETA systems running in France, Germany & Spain for around three years now with hundreds of km of roads. https://5gaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/04.European_Roadmap_towards_C-V2X_deployement.pdf
 

CB91710

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They've had V2X & more recently 5G BETA systems running in France, Germany & Spain for around three years now with hundreds of km of roads. https://5gaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/04.European_Roadmap_towards_C-V2X_deployement.pdf
You are talking cross-border communication, we can't even communicate from city to city.
Los Angeles runs their own software. We use software from Manufactrer "A", our neighboring cities use software from Manufacturers "B" and "C"... none of these are compatible with LADOT, and LADOT software is not compatible with Caltrans (California State-owned intersections)
We don't even have a cohesive standard for emergency vehicle or bus priority intersection operation.
3M and Tomar are the big players in the strobe-operated systems, but there are new players that are using 5G connections and cloud-based operation.
But these all require compatible software to be running on the city's hardware.

Like I said... we are not even close to the VHS/Beta point yet.
 

Sct13

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This is to simplify production.....its really a logistical nightmare (but done very well)

when it comes to "Options" or "Option packages"

They can just load it all in at the factory level and be done with it.....Customer pays the dealer....and it will be shoved at you. Because the dealer will have bought it from the factory....

So commercials while you drive .....nice
 


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