Pale streaks on the fretboard

LtDave32

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Raises hand.

Ultimately gave the guitar to my buddy's son... 5 years later it was still pulling fuzz off of the case, and he had tried to sand it off... all it would do is roll up and clog the paper.
Crazy, the fingerboard and headstock were fine, but the back of the neck never cured. He ended up scraping it back down to the wood with a blade.

So many want so badly to "shave a few bucks and simplify it in the process" by using Home D or Lowes or ?? Home Center shit.

There is a reason why good instrument lacquer is expensive. It provides the finish you are looking for.
 

CB91710

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So many want so badly to "shave a few bucks and simplify it in the process" by using Home D or Lowes or ?? Home Center shit.

There is a reason why good instrument lacquer is expensive. It provides the finish you are looking for.
The body honestly came out pretty nice... until I shot the 2nd coat of clear on it and it wrinkled.
Fortunately, after a week it was solid enough to buff out, so I just cut it back down to the color coat and did without the gloss.
I probably had 20 layers of primer under the color coats... it was silky smooth, but didn't have that deep gloss that you get from a good clear.

But it was an experiment on a plywood Squier, an experiment that told me that I'd rather pay someone to paint my bodies.
 

LtDave32

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The body honestly came out pretty nice... until I shot the 2nd coat of clear on it and it wrinkled.
Fortunately, after a week it was solid enough to buff out, so I just cut it back down to the color coat and did without the gloss.
I probably had 20 layers of primer under the color coats... it was silky smooth, but didn't have that deep gloss that you get from a good clear.

But it was an experiment on a plywood Squier, an experiment that told me that I'd rather pay someone to paint my bodies.
Trade tip for you:

the harder lacquer is, the shinier it will buff out. Buffing is nothing more than a super-fine abrasive process. When it's soft, it has a tendency to gum up in the micro-pores of the finish surface and not polish well. When it's hard, It buffs out to a brilliant shine with an almost ethereal glow. nothing beats the warm glow of a proper lacquer finish.

I've tried to buff lacquer in the early days of my building, only to get hazy blotches and an uneven gloss. One time the damn buffer heated up on the surface and created an "ebb" of lacquer like you threw a pebble in a pond.

This I suspect is the reason so many folks here wait a good 3-4 weeks before buffing.

In my climate, lacquer will get hard enough to chip at two weeks drying time.
 

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Many thanks, Dave! Looks like India Ink or Leather Dye are better choices than any stain, including those Minwax pens. Some people swear by them, though, although I am not sure how long the darkening effect lasts, couldn't find comments about it. Seems that ink or dye are permanent as it gets, I'll probably go that route.
If you go the Fiebings route, I'd be very very careful around plastics. I haven't used it for a fretboard but I've used it extensively in pipemaking, and it will stain the faux ivory I've used for extensions deep enough that I've had to either adjust shapes or live with the stain on it. I'd tape everything off and apply it with a small paintbrush and not the applicator they ship it with.
 

the great waldo

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You could try staining the fingerboard with a mix of vinegar and fine (000/000) wire wool. Mix it up in a glass jar leave it for a few days and apply the liquid with a cloth to the fingerboard and leave it on for a while. It should react to the tannin in the wood and darken it. You could also selectively apply it with a cotton bud to the light areas. Give the fb a clean up afterwards with lemon oil or whatever and you should be good to go. This stuff https://www.dictum.com/en/grinders-accessories/sinensis-camellia-oil-100-ml-705280 is very good for the fb and pretty much everything else.
Cheers
Andrew
 

BadMongo

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You could try staining the fingerboard with a mix of vinegar and fine (000/000) wire wool. Mix it up in a glass jar leave it for a few days and apply the liquid with a cloth to the fingerboard and leave it on for a while. It should react to the tannin in the wood and darken it. You could also selectively apply it with a cotton bud to the light areas. Give the fb a clean up afterwards with lemon oil or whatever and you should be good to go. This stuff https://www.dictum.com/en/grinders-accessories/sinensis-camellia-oil-100-ml-705280 is very good for the fb and pretty much everything else.
Cheers
Andrew
Classic vinegaroon stain / ebonizer can look great or it can turn out super grey looking, depending on the tannin concentration and starting color. Plenty of folks use that in pipe making as an under stain with varying degrees of success. There are recipes online to both keep it from being a rusty mess and to not stink as badly. The times I've used it, it was a less deep pure black (fine as an under stain from a color perspective because the top stain will tint it, but not ideal for contrast) but penetrated more deeply than Fiebings. It would probably leave the plastics alone, but will 100% corrode any nickel in the vicinity (vinegar/vinegar fumes are how a lot of faux-aged nickel hardware gets that way).
I'd probably go with @LtDave32's suggestions - tried and true and less likely to ruin the instrument. I imagine if one wanted to use the India ink as a shader rather than full on black stain, thinning it to about 10% concentration in naphtha would work and could be adjusted over multiple passes, but I'd test it first.
 

larryguitar

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As a leather worker, I'll just add that Fiebings is *extremely* colorfast; think about how sweaty your leather pants get, and the fact that the dye doesn't leach. :rofl:

I'll also add that if you get it on your skin, you'd better be prepared to WEAR it off; it was made for dying skin (leather), after all, and it's very durable.

Larry
 

BadMongo

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As a leather worker, I'll just add that Fiebings is *extremely* colorfast; think about how sweaty your leather pants get, and the fact that the dye doesn't leach. :rofl:

I'll also add that if you get it on your skin, you'd better be prepared to WEAR it off; it was made for dying skin (leather), after all, and it's very durable.

Larry
Can confirm, have learned to wear gloves even if it's just to open the bottle to dunk a pipe cleaner in for a tiny touch up :laugh2:
 

the great waldo

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Fiebings is great for blackening fb's I suppose you could get some brown and mix it with black to taste. To be honest I would just play the guitar and get on with it. Some rosewoods lighten up with age. Going over the fb with a buffing mop and some Menzerna polishing stick usually darkens the wood somewhat, and your fingers as well. I think your fingerboard is sonokelling indonesian rosewood (same as indian just faster grown and tends to be a bit more grey in colour)

Cheers
Andrew
 

electric head

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I must be weird but I think the more color streaking and figuring in wood makes it all the better. I mostly work with fender necks and you get some real odd ball looking necks and the stranger the better. I can stare at wood all day long..
 

ivanvir

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Fiebings is great for blackening fb's I suppose you could get some brown and mix it with black to taste. To be honest I would just play the guitar and get on with it. Some rosewoods lighten up with age. Going over the fb with a buffing mop and some Menzerna polishing stick usually darkens the wood somewhat, and your fingers as well. I think your fingerboard is sonokelling indonesian rosewood (same as indian just faster grown and tends to be a bit more grey in colour)

Cheers
Andrew
I think it is actually Indian rosewood, had to pay CITES for the guitar and there is a detailed description of the fretboard in the papers (mass, Latin name, year, etc.). Anyway, I wouldn't mind leaving it as it is but it looks like a chessboard now, with white pale spots and streaks. I think I will definitely clean it with naphtha and colour it with Fiebings as soon as I finish some recordings, the more I play it the paler those spots get. It's a nice guitar, plays and sounds good and I'd like to give it the treatment in the looks department, too.

Btw., there are water, alcohol and oil based leather dyes. Which one is the best?
 
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E.X

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I bought it new from Thomann Germany
Hah..
Mentioned this in a different forum, but Thomann's "new" isn't our version of new, least not necessarily.

Now this may not apply to you, but it's a good opportunity to point it out.
Thomann has a free return policy that many abuse. You can even see signs of this in the various review comments under certain products' listings. Folks get, have fun, send back; because why not, costs them nothing at all to do so, Thomann handles the shipping fees (albeit in some EU countries, not all).
Said returned items? That folks have had their fun with?

They are not listed as used, they are not listed as display or demoed items.
They are sold as brand new.
So when you buy your next PRS, Gibson, good amp, whatever, it may or it may not be your/our version of new.

Now to be fair, am not aware of whether returned items are checked, or if they are to what an extent.
I am however very aware (and again, you can catch instances of this in various reviews on their website) that occasionally you buy something "new" from them, and when it arrives it's obvious it's been opened and played with. Emphasis on occasionally, this isn't an attempt to discredit Thomann, have used them myself multiple times, great service.
Just.. buyer be ware.

(incidentally, am also an EU resident)
 


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