Overarm (i.e., Pin) Router

pinefd

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This discussion first began in another thread about router tables, but I thought rather than continuing to hijack that thread, I’d begin a new thread dedicated to overarm (pin) routers. And as I mentioned in the other thread, my knowledge on the topic is limited to my knowledge of my latest tool acquisition, which is the Shop Fox Overarm Router, that I purchased from Grizzly. Other than going with a homemade version, this is about as low-end as you can get. I’d love to see some of the other machines, jigs and applications that you guys have, so please, feel free to show us what you got!

To start us off, here is my machine showing some of the applications (on my Version 2 Octave Guitar):

The first thing I did with the machine was the chambering. The first two photos show the completed chambering, with the body sitting on the template, while the third photo shows the template itself:

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These next couple of shots shows the angled jig I made for doing things like the neck tenon and pickup cavities. It could also be used for planing the neck plane and pickup plane on the maple cap, but I didn’t use it for that purpose on this guitar. For the neck tenon, I started the route without using this machine, but instead, I did it “free-hand”, using an MDF template, screwed to the maple cap. But I finished the tenon, taking it to its final depth, using this machine, and the angle jig set at a 5 degree tilt (which is the angle I find works best for this shorter scale). On future builds, I hope to do the complete neck tenon on this machine, but not this time. Here’s the angle jig:

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Note in the photos above that most of the binding channel has been cut. I did this using this machine, with the body flat on the base, using a ½” bit, and a 3/8” pin (I believe).

And here’s a close-up showing how the final neck tenon route was done (yes, I know that the maple cap is not seated completely on the mahogany...that's because it's just taped down for now, since I'll be using this guitar as a builder's sample/template that can be completely disassembled):

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And lastly, here’s a photo showing the control cavity and cover routes, both done with the machine and corresponding templates:

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My next project on the machine will be to route the pickup cavities. I’ll hopefully get to that sometime this week, and will report back on my progress.

Until then, please feel free to show us your overarm routers, jigs and applications!


Frank
 

VictorB

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Wow. All I can say is wow...

You do great work Frank!!!
 

Ole'Lefty

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A photo of my Shopsmith OPR. Manual feed but still quite useful and accurate-made my own guide pins(the brass one shown is an initial centering pin).
 

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SG Lou

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Thats it............You got me sold Frank.
Next stop, Grizzly web site...:thumb:
 

pinefd

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Wow. All I can say is wow...

You do great work Frank!!!

x 1000000000000000000000000000000000000:applause:


Thanks guys! I really appreciate the kind words!


I would like to see u make a build thread :)

Gothika, while I'd love to do one, I really don't have the time to. I barely have time to do any building these days, and I've found that trying to document a build in detail is almost as time consuming as the build itself. I usually wait until after my builds are done, and then post a few photos I snapped along the way. Sorry...:thumb:

I've got to say, that I really admire those forum members who do document their builds in detail for us all to see and learn from. And it's many of these same members who have given me a bad case of TAS (tool acquisition syndrome), which has culminated in yet another of my "hey look at my new tool" threads! :lol:


Frank
 

pinefd

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A photo of my Shopsmith OPR. Manual feed but still quite useful and accurate-made my own guide pins(the brass one shown is an initial centering pin).

Thanks for posting Mike! Just out of curiosity, how did you make your pins? I assume on a metal lathe? And did you make them out of brass too?


Frank
 

Ole'Lefty

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Hello Frank-I turned my pins on a Unimat-very small Austrian made lathe; now sought by collectors. I have two-one set up for "wood turning" that I use in my den to turn acrylic and celluloid fountain pens on the "bad" days. I used annealed drill rod-there is just enough flex to it to keep it from being fragile but the OD is more accurate for collet fit. In that setup I use the collet of the lower router to hold my pin. I have the luxury of being able to choose which router will be the pin and which the business end. I found that to be beneficial when I made inlay templates-especially for the logo.(1/16th" pin and bit combo)

Funny story there-totally forgot that I would end up with a reversed template-second try I put the master on top, put a consumable slice of "baloney" between the master(it was a hand cut in 3/32nd ebony) and the Lexan and routed all the way through the lexan to get the "positive."

I, too, sometimes wonder why I have the Marlin-barely even fired up-I wish I had bought the "Shark"(large) CNC from Rockler, though it is too short for a neck-my Marlin is the wider one and I bought longer rods. I have another ShopSmith OPR, used but not set up -I think I'll list it down in "for sale." I do not have a sufficient compressor to run the pneumatic part of the Grizzly-SF in the house. An OPR properly set up can do all but the top carve on the body, though my partially completed "boxtop" would allow for very consistent ledges.

I am just now getting strength back from a two month battle with flu induced pneumomia and I hope to get productive soon. O'L

PS-anyone one hear from OJ?
 

LG2

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Its a router and it over head... Here is what I use to make pickup and control pockets.. :laugh2:

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9smWI8Xz1k"]CW[/ame]
 

'59_Standard

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Frank, how do you cut that difficult Binding area section. With the Machine or by hand? Thanks.


.

DSC03938_1000.jpg
 

eshuffle

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I added 1/4 stop blocks for the depth of cut. Once you adjust your depth were you want it to be you can use these 1/4 slides to only allow a 1/4 deep cuts on your passes. It helps so you dont have to keep adjusting the 2 screw nuts.

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bfcg

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I added 1/4 stop blocks for the depth of cut. Once you adjust your depth were you want it to be you can use these 1/4 slides to only allow a 1/4 deep cuts on your passes. It helps so you dont have to keep adjusting the 2 screw nuts.

excellent tip:thumb:
 

pinefd

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I added 1/4 stop blocks for the depth of cut. Once you adjust your depth were you want it to be you can use these 1/4 slides to only allow a 1/4 deep cuts on your passes. It helps so you dont have to keep adjusting the 2 screw nuts.

Awesome tip, eshuffle! :applause: Thanks! I'll definitely have to try that.


Frank
 

pinefd

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Frank, how do you cut that difficult Binding area section. With the Machine or by hand? Thanks.

DSC03938_1000.jpg

Sorry, I missed this post earlier. I do this cut pretty much by machine these days, similar to how we've seen others around here do it...with one or two little twists. In fact, my technique has changed since getting this new machine. I'll try and post pics tomorrow showing how I do it now.


Frank
 

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I don't have access to a tool budget right now. I do have my wood stocked up and a list of nephews/nieces friends that were promised 21" scale guitars.

I've got to go tune o-matic because I found small span hardware. (made first one like a wrap-around out of Aluminum but didn't get intonation right)

Anyway.. on topic...
I'm stuck with a hand router. I use a dremel router attachment for more detailed work.
Any suggestions on routing my neck pockets a with a set-back angle?

My last attempt, a little Les Paul (shrunk PRS Single I worked up) worked reasonably well. I taped plasticized shims on the body. They've got uniform thickness.
The angle isn't bad. It is a bit clumsy (particularly because I put off the pocket until too far into the body work).

I've got a small Single-Cut, a small Double-Cut, and a couple Flying Vs in my future and I'm looking for tips.

Thanks,m
Steven.
 

sbandyk

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I might as well post a pic of my first 21" scale 'les paul' while I'm here. It's actually done already (round rear cover isn't in yet).. but this is what I've got access to now.

It's for a 5 year old. People have been telling me I'm crazy for making a Mohagony/Spalted Maple guitar for a 5YO. :-/

It's my 2nd guitar. The first was a free-hand draw vaguely similar to an up-side down Explorer done in Pine and Popular w/ maple fret board. That was the trial run.
 

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pinefd

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Frank, how do you cut that difficult Binding area section. With the Machine or by hand? Thanks.

As promised, here's a brief explanation of how I do the binding channel in the cutaway section. And as I mentioned previously, the methods I use are very similar to what others are doing around here as well...with a few minor differences. Most of these methods are new for me, since I just got the overarm router. Here goes:

For my first cut, I used a 1/2" diameter router bit, with a 3/8" guide pin, which yielded a 1/16" wide channel. I could have used the same binding cutter bit that I used in the next step instead, but chose to do it this way. I set the height so that the channel would be at a depth of 1/4" at the highest point in the cutaway (just to the left of where the router bit is in this pic), and this is how that cut looked:

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Next, with the body attached to my angle jig, I set the angle at 5 degrees, to correspond with my neck angle and neck plane:

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And with the binding cutter bit installed that I got from StewMac, I was prepared to make the next cut:

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The photo below shows this cut along the neck line on the right side of the photo. On the left, you can see that I also finished off the cut on the other slope, but this step I'll show in the next post.

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To be continued...
 

pinefd

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The more difficult part of the channel is the left hand slope in the above photo. This, many people do by hand. I took a different approach this time. I've had one of these binding router guides from StewMac hanging around the shop for years:

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I only used it once, and I found it very difficult to use, very scary to use, and not too effective for the narrow cutaway part of a Les Paul style guitar. So I decided to take it apart and make my own adaptation of it, that seemed to work much better. In my version, albeit a bit crude looking, it is much more effective, and is almost idiot proof to work. It's almost impossible to cut away too much by accident. Here are some photos showing it mounted to my Dremel, including some closeups:

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And here's a shot of the completed route from the top...nice and clean (after some minimal cleanup):

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I hope that explains it!


Frank
 

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