Opinions on this Les Paul Custom 1972

NorlinBlackBeauty

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Full headstock, clear images of the pots in the control cavity. I'm curious if it has a volute.

The serial number is meaningless to date the guitar during these Norlin years.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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All of this info below is largely meaningless and still some incorrect. Chances seem fairly good it is a '72, but for that kind of cash, I'd insist on full disclosure. Fully original in its original case might be worth $3500, but not as shown.

He may very well just not know the guitar history well. I always err on the side of over-cautious.


This is a VERY RARE opportunity to purchase a 1972 Gibson Les Paul Custom 'Black Beauty'..... The Gibson Les Paul first appeared in 1952 with a mahogany body, mahogany neck, rosewood fretboard and two P90 single coil pickups. In late 1953, a more luxurious version was introduced, most likely at the specific request of Les Paul himself, as he wanted a more luxurious and classy looking guitar. He asked for a black guitar as he wanted it to "look like a tuxedo". The iconic Les Paul Custom was born..

Nicknamed the "Black Beauty", the guitar had gold-plated hardware, a mahogany body and neck, ebony fret board, and mother of pearl block markers inlays in the fretboard. The "Split Diamond" inlay on the headstock was taken from the carved archtop Super 400, which was the top of the Gibson line. The frets were low and flat for maximum speed, as opposed to the usual medium jumbo frets found on other Les Pauls. As a result, the guitar soon was given the nickname "The Fretless Wonder". In mid-1957, Gibson began to equip the Les Paul Custom with the new PAF (Patent Applied For) pickup designed by Seth Lover.

Anyway, enough of the history lesson...! I bought this guitar a few years ago because I wanted one to sound just like the guitar in the intro to one of my favourite songs, Radar Love, which was also apparently played on a '72 Custom. Unfortunately however..... (maybe it was the amp... or me...!). It still sounds fabulous though...!

The serial number is 125272 which I believe dates it to around 1972, as does the Made in USA stamp on the back of the headstock (which was introduced in 1970) and the omission of a dot on the 'i' of Gibson, which occurred between 1968 and 1972.

It's in very good condition for it's age and has recently been restrung (with Rotosound 9-46) and professionally set-up so it plays beautifully. As far as I am aware, the guitar is totally original.

Although I was expecting it to have ''witch-hat" volume and tone controls, I've been assured by collectors that the "speed knobs" on the guitar are authentic.

Comes with a Gibson heavy duty plastic flightcase and is very heavy so cash-on-collection preferred please. Alternatively could deliver or meet in Essex/M25 area for petrol money.

Any questions please message me.
Cheers
Ian
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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Control cavity. There are numbers stamped on the pots. On the pot I cleaned up the string reads: 1377325

73 indicates the year and 25 indicates the week of the pot production.

379395




I'm fairly certain a '72 should have that protrusion at the bottom of the headstock, known as a volute.

I digitally "erased" a portion of the serial number to prevent it from being used to deceive.

379398
 
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NorlinBlackBeauty

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Thanks for the advice:thumb:
Best of luck. :wave:

I just think anyone deserves to know what they are getting. It is also a negotiating tool, pointing out the non original parts. The chainsaw case is far from an actual purpose designed "flight case". You will probably never know if the speed knobs are truly Gibson authentic.

Most images I have seen of LPCs from that narrow band of years have tulip shaped tuning knobs. The one I have an that one are the half round.

These are actual Witch hats. Fugly, imwo.

379405
 
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dayguitar

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Best of luck. :wave:

I just think anyone deserves to know what they are getting. It is also a negotiating tool, pointing the non original parts. The chainsaw case is far from an actual purpose designed "flight case". You will probably never know if the speed knobs are truly Gibson authentic.

Most images I have seen of LPCs from that narrow band of years have tulip shaped tuning knobs. The one I have an that one are the half round.

These are actual with hats. Fugly, imwo.

View attachment 379405

Thanks for that info my friend. Appreciate it.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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Thanks for that info my friend. Appreciate it.
You are quite welcome. Most of what I told you was learned here.

Full original may be best for the collectible, but not necessarily for sound or playability.

Two points:

The "Fretless wonder" frets suck for Rock playing. Narrow and short, they are not good for bending. I had them on my Lester. Between the previous owner and me I wore them down quickly. A refret was in order. I'd ask for detailed images on the lower frets with some strings pulled back to see the wear.

The pots Gibson used back then were 300K, not allowing to guitar to reach it's full tone potential. 500K pots with "50's" wiring remedies that.

 
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ICR

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As mentioned, check the pot date codes. I owned my 1972 Les Paul Custom for many years before removing the solder to see 1974 date codes on the pots. I removed and saved the pots for dating and replaced them with 500k.

My experience with Norlin Era Les Pauls is that the 300K pots make them sound not as good. I'll bet the 1970s guitars in this video had 300k pots.

My other theory is Dimarzio sold so many "Super Distortion" pickups because the sound better than the stock pickups with the 300K pots.

 

Progrocker111

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Typical mid to late 1973 LP Custom (according to serial number, cavity routing etc.), Grovers were not so rare during late 73/74.

Sure, knobs arent original.
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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As mentioned, check the pot date codes. I owned my 1972 Les Paul Custom for many years before removing the solder to see 1974 date codes on the pots. I removed and saved the pots for dating and replaced them with 500k.

My other theory is Dimarzio sold so many "Super Distortion" pickups because the sound better than the stock pickups with the 300K pots.
So it may have been the pots and not the T-tops ... I can get onboard with that. The 500k Pots transformed my Lester.

I fell for the DiMarzio marketing back then and added two PAFs in 1978. The 500K pots, upgraded caps made the T-top sound noticeably better than the DiMarzio, especially in the neck.
 




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