On the topic of quality.

moreles

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So I just got off the phone with Gibson. I was told “this is normal for some guitars”
He went on to confirm the theory of the nitro finish and how it is applied electrostaticlly. (Is that a word?)
He said sometimes it goes away on its own but sometimes it will need the old copper shielding trick on the plastic plates.????
It is discouraging to read this. Making electric guitars in a way that yields an electrical problem -- and the Gibson rep admits to this -- is stupid and wrong. Hope it goes away? Add shielding? Why don't they add shielding to fix the problem they built into the guitar? Hope it goes away? Why hope for that, when you can make the guitar go away instantly by returning it. I often speak out against unreasonable Gibson bashing, but then I encounter something like this where it seems they really just ought to get clobbered.
If their chose paint process leaves a residual charge, why don't they implement a method of neutralizing that charge before selling the guitar?
 

pillbug

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That’s the new true historically correct unpotted truss rod. For those who don’t like the sheathed OR non sheathed version.
 

Red Planet

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This is a very semi common problem when the humidity dips down as it comes up the problem goes away. Some finishes are more susceptible to it than others. I usually use a dryer sheet with good results but my Luthier buddy says get some spray on static remover such as Static Guard. For those that are appalled by static electricity, it is something nature gave us, exists in our universe, and we occasionally deal with it/part of life.

I have an old Lacquered Tele that gets static on the Pickguard and I just use a dryer sheet. It temporarily goes away but as the humidity comes up it goes away anyway. For quite a while when I got this guitar I spent a considerable amout of time investigating what was wrong with the electronics only to finally figure out (after I rewired the whole guitar) that it was static electricity. I was earlier convinced it was a wiring problem.
 
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Six6String6

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Got it back from the shop. Their tech said “dryer sheets until it goes away…if it does”
I kinda figured that was going to be the result.
Oh well!
 

Big Monk

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So I just got off the phone with Gibson. I was told “this is normal for some guitars”
He went on to confirm the theory of the nitro finish and how it is applied electrostaticlly. (Is that a word?)
He said sometimes it goes away on its own but sometimes it will need the old copper shielding trick on the plastic plates.????
Wow. They know about it and can’t just add that in at the factory. You would think you pay $3600 plus tax for a guitar and they would do that for you.
He told me to go back to Long & McQuade if it continues and they would do that for me.
I’m gonna go home after work and kiss my Epiphone!

Definitely kiss that Epiphone but maybe not because it doesn’t need shielding!

I’m in a pickle right now because despite extensive troubleshooting, I have a pretty gnarly buzz in my Epiphone 50s Standard. I’m about to shield the cavities and plates before rewiring it.

I know it’s guitar specific because my humbucker equipped Squier Standard Strat does not have it and that guitar has a shielded pickguard and shielding paint in the cavity. Also, I’ve ruled out a bad harness or electrical component because even with pickups connected directly to the jack, the buzz there and pronounced.
 

Dogbreath

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This situation is rare. My 2016 SG had the same problem, and the dealer told me the same thing as was explained by Gibson. I packed the control cavity with dryer sheets and that helped greatly. After a while the static noise went away and I removed the drier sheets. I never experienced the problem again. I don’t remember how long it took, but it wasn’t long.
 

Six6String6

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I might pack the cavities but I don’t have the stones to drag a dryer sheet across that beautiful finish on my guitar. That just freaks me out.
 

dasherf17

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My feeling exactly, LocoTex. I popped the plates off the back to have a quick look but did not see anything obvious. I’m not digging deeper as long as it’s under warranty. Also my local store is very local so I can always play my Epi or Fender for a few days.

And I know it’s the Gibson as nothing else does it with either amp I have.

I just find it ironic as my previous post touched on the topic of Gibson quality issues. I should have kept my mouth shut

My experience...get one thing fixed, gotta fix another...
Good looking 'Paul, S6S6...
 

dasherf17

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I might pack the cavities but I don’t have the stones to drag a dryer sheet across that beautiful finish on my guitar. That just freaks me out.

That happened to me too years ago, I don't remember which guitar, but it was a kind of dry day where I got zapped all over the place, in the home, any metal object. Just a freak atmospheric thing.
 

blouie

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Whatever you do, avoid playing outside during a storm!!! :)

Seriously though, let us know how it turns out with the dryer sheets, etc. It's good to know this can happen.
 

Brazilnut

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With me, it's sticky necks, not noisy ones!

Make sure the stiff-feeling ground wire is soldered properly to the neck volume pot.

But it's probably static-y paint, and you'll have to shield the control cavity and switch route....might even have to pull the switch wires and insulate them with heat shrink.
 

Six6String6

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My Lutherie claims it could lessen as the finish ages and wears. I’m hoping for that.
Thing is, as long as it’s being played it’s fine. If my fingers are touching the strings there is no static sound. It’s only if I run my hand along the neck without actually playing where I notice it. I can live with that for now.
The dryer sheet worked on the static on the pick guard on my Squire, but I tried in the other day on the LP with absolutely no effect. Mind you I didn’t rub to hard but I think as much as I did on the Squire. Something in my brain stopped my from dragging that gritty feeling dryer sheet across my beautiful AAA top. And then it leaves this grimy residue on the guitar. I’m shuddering just thinking about it.
 

Six6String6

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There would be a possibility that if your Epi was nitro you would get the same thing.

When you tried the dryer sheet did you try it with the guitar plugged in. Just wondering if it dissipate any of the static or remained the same.

I wonder if took a jumper and hooked it up to your tuner to the ground pole of your house :) if would do anything.

You might be the culprit :) Have someone else rub the guitar and see if does the same thing. Also try grounding yourself before grabbing your guitar.

It’s a thought but my Epiphone LP and Fender Strat don’t do it. The Squier does but only on the pick guard.
After all I have seen and read on line in the last few days I’m very sure it’s the nitro finish.
 

Cjsinla

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After all this, if you can’t hear it while you play, forget about it. And I doubt that copper shielding will help. My problem with static was only the pickguard on an es330 and I could hear it through the amp. I wouldn’t use the sheets on the face of your guitar anyway, just wipe down the neck and don’t worry that the dryer sheet is too rough. Taking some of the glaze off the back of the neck isn’t bad and may even help.
 

Brazilnut

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I think what will cure it is a coat of your natural crud. Nothing like a nasty coat of body oils and sweat to insulate a paint job. So PlayThe Hell Out Of It! That'll fix it. :)
 

zdoggie

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where in hell has pride in workmanship gone too!I seems like that today a real craftsman Is hard to come by.my
advise is learn to do as much of the set up as you can I believe you'll be happier!

zdog
 

dasherf17

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I've gotten a few guitars over the years and I'm glad I learned how to straighten necks, swap out parts, etc. Their being used, I look at them, thinking "I can do that", then try haggling a lower price...
 

fretout

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Like I said earlier, all of my nitro guitars do this, so it is very common, but I live in a very dry climate. If you can humidify the guitar it should help...if you get a replacement, it will probably do it too.

I live in AZ as well, and I have never heard experienced this. I feel sort of left out! I want to be a guitar “Zeus” and shoot static lighting bolts from my fingers while playing D chords at 120db!

Others above have recommended some solutions that should fix the issue, but out of curiosity, what happens if you flip your ground switch on your amp?
 

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