Ok..who is buyin the real 59's?

Rezamatix

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More like people in finance and CEOs. Most lawyers and doctors I know (and I am a doctor, PS) are more than comfortable, but $200k is not exactly chump change for them.
those 40k 63/64 strats are in striking range for you!
 

Patek

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People who have their own businesses and have done really well.

Top people working in finance and on big annual bonuses.

Property / development tycoons.

The occasional musician / person in the music industry who is at the top of their game.

People who have received an inheritance (like parents property) and cash out and decide to treat themselves
 

Mickey B

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Only speaking for myself, the last 4 burst purchases I have direct knowledge of, serial number, price and buyer, were all successful professional rock/country musicians. As a former small time pro who became a lawyer I have amassed a large collection, 350+, and been repeatedly told to downsize 40 guitars and buy a burst. I can't do it. Having played about 20 real ones, some are magic and some are nothing special. Is a '58 really worth 10 to 15x price of a '68? Or 10x a '54? My two cents, they're good and will appreciate, like a Monet or a Rembrandt, but 999 of 1000 "collectors" will never have the wherewithal and many who have them paid 15k about 25 years ago, who knew. Such an outlier high end piece also has crazy volatility and maybe worth a fraction when the greatest/richest generation dies and unfortunately noone knows or cares who (my heros) Bloomfield and Clapton are?
 

2Muchgear

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I love how there always seem to be 2-3000 ‘59’s for sale if you add up auctions/eBay/reverb/Craigslist, etc. there were what, 465 or so made?

The Reverend claims he was offered $5million by a Japanese collector. Screw lawyers and doctors, theit pockets aren’t deep enough (or alligator arms prevent otherwise).
 

Yamaha R1

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More like people in finance and CEOs. Most lawyers and doctors I know (and I am a doctor, PS) are more than comfortable, but $200k is not exactly chump change for them.
It is for the Wall Street guys that are into collecting or just want to own a holy grail guitar.
 

landguitar

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People who have their own businesses and have done really well.

Top people working in finance and on big annual bonuses.

Property / development tycoons.

The occasional musician / person in the music industry who is at the top of their game.

People who have received an inheritance (like parents property) and cash out and decide to treat themselves
I know, it’s the obvious, but clearly Joe B…
I don’t think an auction is his “style” so I don’t see him active in this…this clearly will be a “premium” price event, which is what Neal wants and should get!
That buyers fee thing is a real turnoff unless the value is unimportant and it’s all about provenance.
 

landguitar

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It is for the Wall Street guys that are into collecting or just want to own a holy grail guitar.
I think the Wall Street thing is a misnomer. These days, it’s real estate and Tech folks and investors. I don’t consider that Wall Street - it’s business folks, as someone else mentioned. These prices left doctors and lawyers (and other professionals) behind - no offense to them - a while ago. Reissues/Murphy aged purchases, all day long, but not bursts or other high-value vintage guitars.
 

jwalker99

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The real question is why are there so many bursts for sale now? Clearly there are many collectors, not successful pro musicians, that believe we are at the market top.

when the stock market is finally down for a few weeks, guitar prices soften.
 

pmonk

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The real question is will the value of a 1957-1960 Les Paul increase in value within the next 10-20 years?

There are very few professional musician today purchasing vintage gear so the market is predominately older males (aka Baby Boomers) with money to burn.

The current buyers IMO are dudes who like to show off toys that won't lose value.

Will Gen X and Y continue the trend?

I'm 55 and I just don't see me buying a $150,000 guitar no matter how much money I have.
 

greens

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The real question is will the value of a 1957-1960 Les Paul increase in value within the next 10-20 years?

There are very few professional musician today purchasing vintage gear so the market is predominately older males (aka Baby Boomers) with money to burn.

The current buyers IMO are dudes who like to show off toys that won't lose value.

Will Gen X and Y continue the trend?

I'm 55 and I just don't see me buying a $150,000 guitar no matter how much money I have.
Good question. I think the generational decline in interest in the US (& West more broadly) might be offset by global demand. By that I mean, there are just so many Chinese, they have more and more wealth, and they are getting more and more of a taste for high end iconic collectible stuff. You don't necessarily have to be a Bloomfield fan to want the top of the market electric guitar.
 

gridbias

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I love how there always seem to be 2-3000 ‘59’s for sale if you add up auctions/eBay/reverb/Craigslist, etc. there were what, 465 or so made?

The Reverend claims he was offered $5million by a Japanese collector. Screw lawyers and doctors, theit pockets aren’t deep enough (or alligator arms prevent otherwise).
 


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