Ok seriously... why the Grateful Dead?

EasyAce

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Their music wasn't "that" good... was it?
@BACzero
It was once . . .




. . . and I sit as evidence that you could like some of the Grateful Dead's music (I've always liked improvisational music,
anyway) without becoming one of their touring camp followers whacked out of his nut on whatever it was was floating
freely around their concerts.
 

VerbalPuke

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Your joke may be a little too subtle.

:laugh2:

I don’t know, I was grateful for it.

I have some hippie friends that dig these guys and Phish. I never really got into it much. I always liked the album covers and shirts, all colorful and tie dye, skulls, skeletons, roses, bears and insanity. I wish the Grateful Dead were scarier.
 

Tone deaf

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If this doesn't get your feet tapping:


Another off that album:


Some snarling guitar on Dead Set.

I love the cover art, too! I love sketching and drawing stuff like that. Unfortunately, mine aren't that good.

And the live version of one of my favorites (off of Blues for Allah):

 

redjunior

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Saw them here August 69.
greenlakeaquasanpak.jpg


But saw Zep in the same venue couple of months earlier..
greenlakezeppie.jpeg


I love Seattle...
 

mtgguitar

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Q. How many dead heads does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A. None, they screw in sleeping bags.


Garcia and Clapton were on a safari and got sidetracked and captured by some natives who were going to kill them. "Any last requests?" they were asked and Garcia speaks up and says, "Yes, get me a guitar and just one last time, I want to play the long version of Truckin."
They look at Clapton and he says: "Kill me first!"


Why do Deadheads dance with their hands up in front of their faces? So the music doesn't get in their eyes!
 

rockstar232007

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To me, Jerry was the Grateful Dead. His playing and singing have influenced me hugely. Bob can step in front of a train. I don’t know why, just something about him seems dooshy.
As for the music, they’ve got some good stuff. I like “Friend of the Devil” a LOT more than “Touch of Gray”.
Jerry has a lot of solo work and has worked with quite a few other artists. The album “Shady Grove” was done with David Grisman and it’s amasong. Mostly an acoustic and a mandolin, with Jerry singing.
Bob gives off a lot of "Glenn Frey" vibes.

Also find it funny that Don Henley mentions a "Deadhead sticker" in 'The Boys of Summer".

Coincidence? Yeah, probably? But, still...:hmm:
 

timgman

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THIS is the quintessential post on my opinion on "The Dead"...

I once bought a 2005 Les Paul standard in beautiful Flamed cherry-burst.. I was signed by Bob Weir and some other Jam band guys.................
It was won at the 2005 Boneroo festival... by a hippie.... I paid a total of 700$ for it. It was NEW and UNPLAYED

I was born to rock! so I proceeded to wet-sand the signatures off to remove the DIRTY HIPPIE stamp from my ROCK guitar!~
 

Roberteaux

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I started listening to the Dead in 1972.

I found that some albums were much better than others, but that all releases had at least one true gem on it-- and often, several.

I think that Weir and Garcia were great players. Both were highly innovative players, and neither stuck to the sort of hackneyed licks I noticed being somewhat common to other players and groups.

I thought that the lyrics of Robert Hunter were really marvelous-- a very long cry from the typical "I wanna get laid" crap I was hearing out of so many of the rockers, or the "Oh no, the world sucks! We're dooooomed!" lyrics common to metal.

In the beginning, I was confused by the Dead's penchant for dabbling in diversified Americana, in both the lyrical and musical senses. From the Dead I heard everything: rock, Latin, Southern folk, balladic songs... most every song on every album featured a slightly different approach to music. The only time they fell flat on their face with me was with their disco attempt, "Shakedown Street"... but that was just a single song, and not all there was to be found on the album by the same name. In fact, I think that this was the only song on that album I didn't like.

I didn't get into the Deadhead "scene" all that much. I also didn't think that one could only get loaded at a Grateful Dead concert. I noticed plenty of wasted fans at *every* concert I ever attended and think it's kinda stupid to carry on about the Grateful Dead and dope as if this is the only group who ever had a doper audience.

I don't know about the social ramifications I saw others sneering at in the beginning of the thread. I was never one of those clods who identified so strongly with some group I listened to that I bought into whatever trope others assigned to them, or which the group crafted for others to believe they represented. I'm well aware of the Dead's early history, and their personal influences... but think that the group itself moved on beyond a lot of its earlier social luggage as time went by. One of the reasons they're so hard to "understand" is that they were by no means formulaic.

I never allowed any group to provide me with an identity to begin with. Learned how stupid that was when John Lennon went to socio-political proselytizing while continuing to live like the wealthy piggies he supposedly deplored. Lots of schtick there... the Ballad of John and Yoko left me gasping for air. Can you spell hypocrisy?

They were what they were, and they didn't have millions of fans worldwide for just no reason at all.

--R

 

Soul Tramp

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I met Owsley serendipitously in the early/mid 70's. Saw a guy with a dead t-shirt and start up a conversation. Turned out to be Owsley. It's a small world after all!
 

NewDayHappy

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I like them. Wouldn't consider myself a deadhead, but if they came on over the radio, I wouldn't change the channel.
 

G Man

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Didn't bother reading the whole thread, as I'm sure its full of trashing the GD and deadheads in general, meh.

I spent ten years, from 85-95, catching Jerry and the boys whenever they came within a couple of hundred miles from me, caught a NYE show, Greek Theater shows, yadda yadda yadda. It was a definite had to be there kinda thing. And it wasn't dope and dopers in the audience, it was more the LSD that really set apart the Dead. They basically built the show around the timing on a good clean hit of acid. Drop just before going in and you were guaranteed a good time. Now, obviously everyone was not dosing at every show, but I'd be willing to bet that the majority of touring dead heads dosed at least once during their first few shows and that basically is all it takes to get on the bus.
 

Travis19

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I wish the Grateful Dead were scarier.

Ironically, Garcia's relationships with The Hells Angels and Heroin fit perfectly into the scary category as far as I'm concerned. The characterization of him as a huggable Santa-clause figure was all his fans doing. He couldn't escape it no matter what he did. Hell, he probably could've shot the pope and have still been considered the grandfather of flower-power.
 

Roberteaux

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Ironically, Garcia's relationships with The Hells Angels and Heroin fit perfectly into the scary category as far as I'm concerned. The characterization of him as a huggable Santa-clause figure was all his fans doing. He couldn't escape it no matter what he did. Hell, he probably could've shot the pope and have still been considered the grandfather of flower-power.

All true.

But really, it was Owsley Stanley who had the strongest connection with the Hells, mainly because he once used Baby Huey and Terry the Tramp as his premier agents for distribution of LSD in Northern California. Ed Sanders wrote about that relationship, as did Baby Huey in that whiny autobiography he released several years ago...

Garcia himself was leery of the Hells Angels, and said as much in a self-promoting flick the Angels did about themselves. It appears as though he'd hang out with them if they happened to be on hand-- which they often were, especially in the earlier days of the band's history-- and he had no qualms about playing events staged by the Hells. Jerry's once-girlfriend, the semi-famous Mountain Girl, was closer to Sonny Barger and Sharon than Jerry himself was. But at one point in history, the Hells were a nearly ubiquitous sight at performances by various 60's groups from Cali-- many of whom also used Owsley Stanley as a sound man, especially at live performances.

But your comment was interesting in that it shows how we might be affected by some assignment given to a celebrity or famous musical group-- with said assignment being something far less than an accurate portrayal of the member(s) as he, she, or they really are.

Garcia wasn't a noted ass-kicker by any means, and interviews with him tend to reveal a more centrist, laid back type of personality who was more dedicated towards hedonism than the pursuit of some lofty philosophy or other cerebral crap. He wasn't a bad guy-- but he was a heroin addict and he died of complications that rose from his decades-long indulgence of opiates.

And yet: the Grateful Dead didn't come to be noted as some sort of "heroin band" and instead stuck in everybody's mind as being somehow related totally to LSD as a drug of choice. And that's even though Pigpen and Tom Constanten didn't even like acid to begin with and refused to drop it altogether. Ultimately, Pigpen drank himself to death while eschewing acid-- not that the Dead picked up some cachet of alkie-rock or something... but then, Pigpen wasn't really a front man-- and though he was a popular character among the group's intimates, he wasn't sufficiently prominent to craft a major part of the public "face" of the Grateful Dead.

They were a musical group, period, with the rest of the stuff being either the result of public perception, promotion by the music industry... or even tangential to the basic reality that the Grateful Dead was mainly a bunch of professional musical entertainers first and foremost.

So, some will like their music and some won't. The rest of it is just... fluff.

--R
 
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Cozmik Cowboy

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Garcia...was a heroin addict and he died of complications that rose from his decades-long indulgence of opiates.

Garcia died of a heart attack; no doubt the smack (which he only used for about a decade and a half, and with clean spells interspersed) had a negative effect on his overall health - and definitely hurt his playing -, but he died of Camels, junk food, and a lack of exercise.

Pigpen wasn't really a front man-- and though he was a popular character among the group's intimates, he wasn't sufficiently prominent to craft a major part of the public "face" of the Grateful Dead.
At the start, Pigpen was the frontman; Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions (or at least their core of Jerry, Bob & Pig) morphed into the electric blues band the Warlocks at his insistence, and back then they were very much Pig's band - and I know old-time Deadheads who still maintain that the true GD experience was a Pigpen rave-up. Granted, though, the non-Pig stuff did wander quickly far afield from, and eventually overshadowed, his forte.
 

LPMarshall Hack

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The Dead, lol.


Amy band you need to be baked outta your mind to listen to has gotta suck.
 

Soul Tramp

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Garcia died of a heart attack; no doubt the smack (which he only used for about a decade and a half, and with clean spells interspersed) had a negative effect on his overall health - and definitely hurt his playing -, but he died of Camels, junk food, and a lack of exercise.


Technically speaking, yes, he died of a heart attack. However, drugs, alcohol, and lifestyle all contributed to the heart attack. He'd already had a liver transplant. No doubt a lifetime of drug abuse was a major contributor.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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Technically speaking, yes, he died of a heart attack. However, drugs, alcohol, and lifestyle all contributed to the heart attack. He'd already had a liver transplant. No doubt a lifetime of drug abuse was a major contributor.
Jerry drank very little, and no, he never had a liver transplant (that was Phil, who did drink heavily for a period).
 

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