Odie's Oil for a finish?

solteroblues

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Guys, I know we get a new topic about finishing all of the time, so what's a new one, right? :naughty:

Has anyone has ever used Odie's oil, butter, or wax on anything? Not just guitars, either, but anything? I can only find about 2 guys online that have used it, but it sounds awesome. I've seen youtube videos of it. I have a cheap ebay kit that I plan on finishing in this stuff, and just wanted to see if anyone else had ever tried it. BTW, this stuff is expensive, $30 a jar (9 oz) each, and from what I understand to get a high gloss, you need all 3, so the finish is almost as expensive as the whole guitar kit cost me!!!:lol:

The plan is to try it out on this cheap kit, and if it works well, I'll use it on my Precision kit in a few weeks. Supposedly you can be about done with the whole finishing process in about a week, and it's supposed to be durable - enough so that it was originally designed for wood floors...

I'll post my results, hope to start next week!
 

solteroblues

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Yeah he's like the only one that I've found other than one other builder. It looks great, but it's almost too good to be true kind of thing. But I'm willing to try it out. If it's as good as advertised, then it will become my go to finish.
 

KnightroExpress

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I've used Odie's for a few little sculptures as well as my first guitar. It's nothing short of great, easily my favorite finishing product. Grab a can and give it a shot!
 

KnightroExpress

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Sure thing! Odie's oil is extremely easy to apply and rubs out to a lovely satin by hand. I haven't tried the butter or wax yet, but I intend to soon.





You can't really tell from photos, but the Odie's brings an incredible amount of depth to any wood I've tried it with.
 

Brian I

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Kevin Aram, one of the greatest classical builders on the planet uses Liberon finishing oil exclusively. Check it out:



 

dspelman

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Guys, I know we get a new topic about finishing all of the time, so what's a new one, right? :naughty:

Has anyone has ever used Odie's oil, butter, or wax on anything? Not just guitars, either, but anything? I can only find about 2 guys online that have used it, but it sounds awesome. I've seen youtube videos of it. I have a cheap ebay kit that I plan on finishing in this stuff, and just wanted to see if anyone else had ever tried it. BTW, this stuff is expensive, $30 a jar (9 oz) each, and from what I understand to get a high gloss, you need all 3, so the finish is almost as expensive as the whole guitar kit cost me!!!:lol:

The plan is to try it out on this cheap kit, and if it works well, I'll use it on my Precision kit in a few weeks. Supposedly you can be about done with the whole finishing process in about a week, and it's supposed to be durable - enough so that it was originally designed for wood floors...
I've seen it just once. The application (a salad bowl) was well done, but it's not durable, sorry. The Material Safety Data Sheet won't list anything in it, the manufacturer won't come clean about what's in it, and it's expensive. I want to KNOW what's in something before I use it.

Most oil finishes (including tung oil finish, boiled linseed oil finishes like Tru-Oil, etc.) are less than durable (depending on your definition). I have two guitars with oil finishes, and the one that's been gigged is a filthy mess. it's going to take some serious sanding to get far enough down to get rid of that. Oil finished guitars are gorgeous, fine as home players if they get taken care of -- a lot. They're closet queens, not designed to be taken out.

By refusing to reveal what's in it, Odie's can sell for a very high price and make all kinds of claims, but there's an extensive disclaimer on the site that states that it will not be responsible for the accuracy of any claims. Check it's "Policies" section, which includes:

2. Disclaimer

Products on Odie's Oil web site are provided "as is". Odie's Oil makes no warranties, expressed or implied, and hereby disclaims and negates all other warranties, including without limitation, implied warranties or conditions of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or non-infringement of intellectual property or other violation of rights. Further, Odie's Oil does not warrant or make any representations concerning the accuracy, likely results, or reliability of the use of the products on its internet web site or otherwise relating to such materials or on any sites linked to this site.

3. Limitations

In no event shall Odie's Oil or its suppliers be liable for any damages (including, without limitation, damages for loss of data or profit, or due to business interruption,) arising out of the use or inability to use the materials on Odie's Oil's Internet site, even if Odie's Oil or an Odie's Oil authorized representative has been notified orally or in writing of the possibility of such damage. Because some jurisdictions do not allow limitations on implied warranties, or limitations of liability for consequential or incidental damages, these limitations may not apply to you.

4. Revisions and Errata

The materials appearing on Odie's Oil web site could include technical, typographical, or photographic errors. Odie's Oil does not warrant that any of the materials on its web site are accurate, complete, or current. Odie's Oil may make changes to the materials contained on its web site at any time without notice. Odie's Oil does not, however, make any commitment to update the materials.

Now read that once again. That simply says, "We can hand you a line of BS and will take no responsibility for it."

Buy at your own risk.
 

solteroblues

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Thanks for the info. I play my guitars, but I also baby them. I don't gig, either. So I don't need something super durable, but I don't want fragile, either. I'll find out later this week.
 

j.six

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I ordered some a few weeks ago and it's still sitting in its box. I plan on giving it a go this week, if I can get to it.

Sully
 

solteroblues

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Ok so I have a question. Is the oil supposed to be like honey? And the butter is like a grainy sugary paste? It went on really thick and now after a day do drying after buffing it off, it looks fine and feels really smooth, if not a little soft - like skin almost. Is this normal?
 

straightblues

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Most oil finishes (including tung oil finish, boiled linseed oil finishes like Tru-Oil, etc.) are less than durable (depending on your definition). I have two guitars with oil finishes, and the one that's been gigged is a filthy mess. it's going to take some serious sanding to get far enough down to get rid of that. Oil finished guitars are gorgeous, fine as home players if they get taken care of -- a lot. They're closet queens, not designed to be taken out.
I have two guitars, and soon to be a third, that Roman Rist has built for me with Tru-Oil Finish. I have gigged them regularly for 3 and 4 years. The finish on them looks better today then when I received them. I am not sure what Roman does, but these finishes are very durable and they are aging very nicely.


 

solteroblues

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I have two guitars, and soon to be a third, that Roman Rist has built for me with Tru-Oil Finish. I have gigged them regularly for 3 and 4 years. The finish on them looks better today then when I received them. I am not sure what Roman does, but these finishes are very durable and they are aging very nicely.



Those are beautiful!
 

dspelman

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I have two guitars, and soon to be a third, that Roman Rist has built for me with Tru-Oil Finish. I have gigged them regularly for 3 and 4 years. The finish on them looks better today then when I received them. I am not sure what Roman does, but these finishes are very durable and they are aging very nicely.
Very pretty guitars.
For years I built and finished very high end walnut stocks for long guns (generally costing four to five figures). I used boiled linseed oil (that's what Tru-Oil is) as a finish, followed by several coats of carnauba wax. The finishes are absolutely gorgeous, with great wood depth and figure. The issue with the stuff is that it's not durable and it's not resistant to moisture.

As a result, I often ended up redoing a lot of very high end walnut stocks whose finish was ruined on Alaskan hunts where it rained every day. The guides on those hunts rely on stainless steel guns and plastic stocks. Nowhere near as pretty as the blued guns with walnut stocks, but far more durable.

I have no idea what you classify as "regular" gigging or "aging nicely", but I suggest that you occasionally remove the knobs and check protected areas of the finish and compare to the wear areas.

Tru Oil will not "age" like nitrocellulose lacquer. It won't naturally "amber." It will, however, pull dirt and detritus from sweat and dust into itself over time.

Mahogany is a softer, grainier wood than walnut, and will get dirtier faster. My "oiled finish" guitars are koa, and the darkening on the one that was regularly gigged (by the previous owner) wasn't even noticed until he pulled a pickup.

At some point, I'll shake everything off the guitar and redo the finish. But trust me, oil finishes are neither durable nor particular protective.
 

Brian I

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IMHO, oil finishes are very attractive; here's a classical guitar that was built for me that was finished in Liberon finishing oil (the maker is a peer of Aram). I really love how it's a really nice cross between satin and gloss and really brings out the beauty of the birdseye maple. I know nothing of Odie's, but I plan to give Liberon a try when I get back to my shop.



 

solteroblues

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that is gorgeous Brian!

Dspelman, I respect your opinion of oil finishes, however, tru-oil is not boiled linseed oil. It may be similar, but all of the research I have done on it says that it is not. Some research even suggests that it has plasticizers added. I don't know what it is, but on my test samples with it, it does create buildup and turns very hard. I have a difficult time believing that Tru-oil will go bad like you're describing. I've read countless articles of gun finishers using Tru-oil on their stocks, but no mention of the nasty mess you are describing.

That said, so far I am not impressed with the Odie's Oil. Easy to apply? Yes. Rub it on, wait 45 minutes and rub off, wait 24 hours. Nice sheen? Yes, not bad, not high gloss, but it does shine. I even did the tricks recommended to achieve a "high gloss, wet look" per the instruction manual I found on their website. But, so far, it is very soft, feels more like skin than a wood finish to me, very velvety. I can lightly drag my finger nail across it and leave marks. Now, I can re-buff it out with my finger tip, but I was expecting it to completely dry and harden. I can rub my fingers across it and it doesn't leave any marks or fingerprints, as if it were still "wet". Granted, I've only waited 36 hours, but I read that it would be completely dried or "hard" in 24, and ready to be used in 72. Knight, have you had this experience? When was yours "hardened"? If it does get hard and scratch resistant, then it may be the perfect finish for me, as I love how smooth it is, but it does not appear to be much protection at all...

I'm going to wait until after the long weekend before I touch it again, and by that time it will have had about 5 full days of dry time, and then I'll pass judgement. Until then, I'm thinking Tru-oil for my real build...
 

dspelman

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that is gorgeous Brian!

Dspelman, I respect your opinion of oil finishes, however, tru-oil is not boiled linseed oil. It may be similar, but all of the research I have done on it says that it is not. Some research even suggests that it has plasticizers added. I don't know what it is, but on my test samples with it, it does create buildup and turns very hard. I have a difficult time believing that Tru-oil will go bad like you're describing. I've read countless articles of gun finishers using Tru-oil on their stocks, but no mention of the nasty mess you are describing.
To be clear, boiled linseed oil was, at one time, actually boiled. The heating changed the character of ordinary flax seed (linseed) oil enough that it dried/polymerized faster.

These days, the term boiled means combined with chemistry (usually metal-based dryers (some containing arsenic, beryllium, chromium, cadmium and nickel)) and solvents that produce essentially the same results. Tru Oil is 56% Mineral Spirits (Stoddard Solvent), 11% ordinary (not "boiled") linseed oil and 33% "Proprietary Oil" (that's the boiled, chemistry-enhanced part). As you say, it creates buildup and turns hard. It doesn't really "dry" as much as it gels. In fact, you can layer it enough that it gets very glossy indeed. And it's good stuff. Every instance of boiled linseed oil has about the same Materials Safety Data Sheet.

It's not a "nasty mess." It doesn't "go bad." It makes for very pretty gunstocks, nice axe handles, nice guitar necks. But even glossy and hard, it simply does not protect all that well, nor does it resist moisture in liquid form all that well, nor does it keep your guitar/axe handle/gun stock from getting dirty and dinged over time. You will NOT hear this a lot from woodworkers who sell products enhanced with the finish. You will hear this from gunshops and gun magazines and hunting guides and from folks like me who've done a couple of thousand gunstocks and from folks like me who have oil-finished guitars that have actually been gigged over a longish period of time. You don't have to believe me and I won't feel bad if you don't.

Nothing at all wrong with it, though one of the modern UV catalyzed finishes will protect and likely outlast it through a nuclear winter and past the End of Days like cockroaches and coyotes <G>.
 

KnightroExpress

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Being an oil finish, I didn't really expect it to be very protective. After I get some build and buff it up a bit I don't think it feels quite so soft, but it's not what I'd consider 'tough'.
 

purelojik

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Hey guys,

I got some pingbacks to my blog from here and figured i'd jump on board to answer any questions about some of the finishes i've been using.

With regards to odies oil and pretty much any other oil, it isnt supposed to be super protective, just supposed to enhance the beauty and offer whatever minor protection wax is supposed to ensure.

the oil, butter and wax work as a system where you are first oilinging with a little wax added, then oiling and waxing equal parts, then just hard waxing with the final product. depending on your humidity and temperature in your area it might take longer for things to dry. Im in los angeles and i give a day and a half or so between coats just because.

The roasted maple build i used this on is the first full build using odies oil.

that build is this one. Up close you can see the shine/sheen and its only been sanded up to about 400 or something. you get a might higher shine the further up you go. This is using the 3 coats oil, 2 coats butter and two coats of wax. then buffing with a cloth till my arm looked like popeye.






The owners super happy with it as well.

The other oil i used before this was watco's teak oil. works well but was way too thin for my likes. i never got the build i wanted even with a lot of coats. I know these types of oils arent supposed to build, but whatever result i got with the odies is exactly what i wanted so im just gonna stick with that.

here's the walnut with teak oil and Trewax



If there are any questions please ask away. if its build related i encourage asking on the corresponding blog page so other users can benefit if they have the same question. thanks guys!

-alex
 




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