Normal truss rod cavity?

PierM

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Take the bottom truss rod cover screw hole as reference, and see the space between that hole and the bottom of the nut. In the first picture, that space is huge, not normal. You just need to find what that blob in the middle is.

For sure a top/planar picture, instead angled, would be much better.
 

vagabond09

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You are correct in that threads showing are not an automatic indicator of issues.

A better thing to look for is the position of the crescent washer behind the nut.

It is clearly visible in all of your examples, regardless of the amount of threads showing.

That is the important part.

We cannot confirm from that one pic where the crescent washer is, or if there are spacers added behind the nut, because of that wood strip...

I have seen it posted in here where for whatever reason, the crescent washer starts to sink into the neck wood.

I think it was on an Explorer, and the guy had to return it.

It is very rare AFAIK, but it can happen. That's all we are trying to find out for ya!

There may be nothing wrong with it at all.... the jury is still out awaiting further evidence! :laugh2:
Yeah, I don't know why but case sure is interesting :D
I think I've seen what you mentioned. Where the crescent washer was sunken deep into the wood, but the one I saw was due to truss issues. So the luthier I believe had to drill some grooves within the cavity and placed the washers deeper into the wood.
 

vagabond09

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Take the bottom truss rod cover screw hole as reference, and see the space between that hole and the bottom of the nut. In the first picture, that space is huge, not normal. You just need to find what that blob in the middle is.

For sure a top/planar picture, instead angled, would be much better.
Thanks for your words again, PierM.
WIll surely ask my friend to do that. :)
 

mudface

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I'm trying to compare it with my 2004 Gibson les paul by picture since it isn't too far off from 2005. Do you mean that the truss rod is deeper inside? Or is out more than it should be?

If you remove the nut i think we can find some answers. There should be no harm removing the nut.

Like with most of the examples of the other instruments shown,.... the nut should seat closer to the Fretboard "nut". If it was where it should be,... way more thread would be exposed. Removing the nut will clarify the issue.
 
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vagabond09

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1572621416049.jpg

Was able to get another picture from my friend. He's been busy... He said there seems to be one washer visible. I asked him if it looks like it's been sunken into the wood, he says he has no clue... He's only a player and knows nothing about the tech stuff on guitars :p
 

timgman

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Should have a half moon washer behind the nut. If that's there, Id say it's fine. some nitro cracking but hey it's a flawed finish we love...
 

timgman

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Whoa, wait. that's not correct. is that a square block of... something?
 

vagabond09

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Whoa, wait. that's not correct. is that a square block of... something?
Yeah... This is why I opened up the thread. A strange shim seems to be in the cavity, but as one of the members pointed out here, it is indeed under the veneer. So maybe it was a factory defect of some sort? :p
 

MooCheng

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the odd looking piece of wood sticking out next to the t/r nut might be the end of the filler strip that runs the length of the neck closing off the truss rod route ?

the finish looks in keeping with the rest of the headstock sort of suggesting it left Gibson that way.

Gibson lets all sorts of whacky stuff out the gate. If the truss rod works then its probably nothing to worry about
 

vagabond09

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the odd looking piece of wood sticking out next to the t/r nut might be the end of the filler strip that runs the length of the neck closing off the truss rod route ?

the finish looks in keeping with the rest of the headstock sort of suggesting it left Gibson that way.

Gibson lets all sorts of whacky stuff out the gate. If the truss rod works then its probably nothing to worry about
I agree. The cavity does seem to not have any work done. According to my friend, the guitar has gotten a few setups throughout the years, and the luthiers have never said anything odd about it and the truss rod seems to be funcitioning without any problem.
 

PierM

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:shock: wtf

The nut seems going underneath, and that blob sticking out of the wood seems shaped as the nut?

At this point Im curious to know if that truss rod is working....
 

mudface

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:shock: wtf

The nut seems going underneath, and that blob sticking out of the wood seems shaped as the nut?

At this point Im curious to know if that truss rod is working....

It kinda looks like a stick that goes under the plastic veneer and rests on the TR nut....... as if to help with securing the TR cover screw..... Looks to have nitro gooped on it and took on the shape of the nut,.... as if the nut has never been adjusted since leaving the factory.... :dunno:???
 

PierM

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It kinda looks like a stick that goes under the plastic veneer and rests on the TR nut....... as if to help with securing the TR cover screw..... Looks to have nitro gooped on it and took on the shape of the nut,.... as if the nut has never been adjusted since leaving the factory.... :dunno:???

That’s exactly my impression too. Must be a Friday job at the factory, :thumb:
 

DaveSG

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I agree. The cavity does seem to not have any work done. According to my friend, the guitar has gotten a few setups throughout the years, and the luthiers have never said anything odd about it and the truss rod seems to be funcitioning without any problem.


Going to agree with this. I know quite a few others proposed the theory that it is a shim piece to allow the truss rod cover screw to have something more to bite into, but what stops that from being viable to me is that an end-grain glue-on shim isn't really going to strengthen much, and I think that theory is giving Gibson way too much credit :laugh2:. I'm MUCH more inclined to think that Gibson didn't spend the time caring about a tiny bit of filler strip sticking over the edge instead of taking the time to care enough about a non-visible part of the guitar to splice a repair patch in there.

I had two separate Gibson SGs, one from 2003 and one from 2006, where the 2006 had a control cavity screw that was screwed in poorly enough to crack the body wood, and on the '03 a control cavity screw that missed the body wood completely and just gouged the edge of it. I really miss that guitar and if I ever find it again, I'll be able to confirm it was my old guitar by the hack job that is the control cavity :rofl:

The real question here, is how does the guitar perform? How is the truss rod? Is it adjustable? Within a certain adjustment range? Can the neck go flat and then to full relief with adjustment? If so, then probably no problem.
 

DaveSG

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I have never seen anything like that block behind the truss rod adjustment nut before on any of the Gibsons I have had over the years including Flying V, Explorer, LP, SG.

I had a 2006 Explorer that I purchased new and over a time span of 6 years, the truss rod adjustment nut burrowed its way into the wood and the neck could no longer be straightened. I tried the spacers behind the nut and nothing would stop it from burrowing into the wood. I shipped the guitar to the factory in 2012 under lifetime warranty and they scrapped it and sent me a new guitar.

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Wow, that is something else. Thank you for sharing those pictures. You learn something every day. I wonder if that was just punky wood or what. That is fascinating. People complain about binding scraping and ugly fretboard wood, but here is a truly validated return issue!
 

vagabond09

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I have never seen anything like that block behind the truss rod adjustment nut before on any of the Gibsons I have had over the years including Flying V, Explorer, LP, SG.

I had a 2006 Explorer that I purchased new and over a time span of 6 years, the truss rod adjustment nut burrowed its way into the wood and the neck could no longer be straightened. I tried the spacers behind the nut and nothing would stop it from burrowing into the wood. I shipped the guitar to the factory in 2012 under lifetime warranty and they scrapped it and sent me a new guitar.

The infamous story of the washer burrowing its way in. Now that’s scary... I’m curious as to what Gibson replied and said about the situation :D
 

vagabond09

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Going to agree with this. I know quite a few others proposed the theory that it is a shim piece to allow the truss rod cover screw to have something more to bite into, but what stops that from being viable to me is that an end-grain glue-on shim isn't really going to strengthen much, and I think that theory is giving Gibson way too much credit :laugh2:. I'm MUCH more inclined to think that Gibson didn't spend the time caring about a tiny bit of filler strip sticking over the edge instead of taking the time to care enough about a non-visible part of the guitar to splice a repair patch in there.

I had two separate Gibson SGs, one from 2003 and one from 2006, where the 2006 had a control cavity screw that was screwed in poorly enough to crack the body wood, and on the '03 a control cavity screw that missed the body wood completely and just gouged the edge of it. I really miss that guitar and if I ever find it again, I'll be able to confirm it was my old guitar by the hack job that is the control cavity :rofl:

The real question here, is how does the guitar perform? How is the truss rod? Is it adjustable? Within a certain adjustment range? Can the neck go flat and then to full relief with adjustment? If so, then probably no problem.

This is the theory I’m most leaning towards, too. Just a job lazy job done from the Gibson factory :D
 

DarrellV

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I have never seen anything like that block behind the truss rod adjustment nut before on any of the Gibsons I have had over the years including Flying V, Explorer, LP, SG.

I had a 2006 Explorer that I purchased new and over a time span of 6 years, the truss rod adjustment nut burrowed its way into the wood and the neck could no longer be straightened. I tried the spacers behind the nut and nothing would stop it from burrowing into the wood. I shipped the guitar to the factory in 2012 under lifetime warranty and they scrapped it and sent me a new guitar.

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Thanks CB!!! I didn't know it was you back then! :cheers:
 

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